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I have the following part of C code:

char c;
int n = 0;
while ( (c = getchar()) != EOF ){
    if (c == "\n"){
        n++;
    }
}

during compilation, compiler tells me

warning: comparison between pointer and integer [enabled by default]

The thing is that if to substitute "\n" with '\n' there are no warnings at all Can anyone explain me the reason. Another strange thing that I am not using pointers at all.

I am aware of the following questions

but in my opinion they are unrelated to my question

PS. If instead of char c; there will be int c; there will be still warning

share|improve this question
    
To detect EOF c needs to be defined a sint. – alk Feb 15 '15 at 13:51
up vote 7 down vote accepted

\n' is called a character literal and is a scalar integer type.

"\n" is called a string literal and is an array type. Note that arrays decay to pointers and so that's why you're getting that error.

This may help you understand:

 // analogous to using '\n'
char c;
int n = 0;
while ( (c = getchar()) != EOF ){
    int comparison_value = 10; // 10 is \n in ascii encoding
    if (c == comparison_value){
        n++;
    }
}

// analogous to using "\n"
char c;
int n = 0;
while ( (c = getchar()) != EOF ){
    int comparison_value[1] = {10}; // 10 is \n in ascii encoding
    if (c == comparison_value){ // error
        n++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
'\n' does not have type char, it has type int. – Dietrich Epp Oct 24 '12 at 1:22
    
I think char gets promoted to int. – imreal Oct 24 '12 at 1:22
2  
I'm not going to go standard diving, I'll just refer to it as scalar. – Pubby Oct 24 '12 at 1:23
3  
It's one of the slight differences between C and C++. Since this is C, it is indeed an int. – Mysticial Oct 24 '12 at 1:24
1  
The difference between it being char or int is irrelevant to his error. – Pubby Oct 24 '12 at 1:32

Basically '\n' is a literal expression that evaluates to a char. "\n" is a literal expression that evaluates to a pointer. So by using this expression, you are effectively using a pointer.

The pointer in question is pointing to a region of memory that contains an array of characters (\n in this case) followed by a termination character that tells code where the array ends.

Hope that helps?

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