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The C++11 spec is clear that implicitly-generated special functions (i.e., default constructor, destructor, copy/move constructors, and copy/move assignment operators) have exception specifications. But the spec seems be written only in terms of the now-deprecated dynamic exception specifications (i.e., "throw (T1, T2, T3)"). This is backed up by the example in 15.4/14:

struct A {
  A();
  A(const A&) throw();
  A(A&&) throw();
  ~A() throw(X);
};
struct B {
  B() throw();
  B(const B&) throw();
  B(B&&) throw(Y);
  ~B() throw(Y);
};
struct D : public A, public B {
  // Implicit declaration of D::D();
  // Implicit declaration of D::D(const D&) throw();
  // Implicit declaration of D::D(D&&) throw(Y);
  // Implicit declaration of D::D() throw(X, Y);
};

Notes are not normative, I know, but it's noteworthy that D's copy constructor is declared throw() instead of noexcept. It makes a difference, because the behavior of the program is different if a throw() is violated versus if a noexcept is violated.

The text in 15.4/14 above the example is normative, and it says:

An implicitly declared special member function (Clause 12) shall have an exception-specification. If f is an implicitly declared default constructor, copy constructor, move constructor, destructor, copy assignment operator, or move assignment operator, its implicit exception-specification specifies the type-id T if and only if T is allowed by the exception-specification of a function directly invoked by f’s implicit definition; f shall allow all exceptions if any function it directly invokes allows all exceptions, and f shall allow no exceptions if every function it directly invokes allows no exceptions.

Given that only dynamic exception specifications are referred to here, I fear that implicitly-generated special member functions are never declared noexcept. Is that really the case?

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How could they ever be declared noexcept? Did you want the compiler to go through your code and check if you never throw exceptions? –  Seth Carnegie Oct 24 '12 at 1:23
3  
@SethCarnegie: I'd expect the compiler to use noexcept if it deduced that the dynamic exception specification would be throw(). –  KnowItAllWannabe Oct 24 '12 at 1:28
    
That paragraph seems stupid. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 24 '12 at 1:32
    
Since "12 [...] A function with a non-throwing exception-specification does not allow any exceptions.", indifferently either of noexcept or throw() is a valid exception-specification that allows no exceptions. That seems about enough for paragraph 14, which doesn't requiree a dynamic-exception-specification in particular. I'm not sure I grasp the whole picture well enough to make that an answer. –  Luc Danton Oct 24 '12 at 1:35
1  
"It makes a difference, because the behavior of the program is different if a throw() is violated versus if a noexcept is violated." Really? How so? –  Nemo Oct 24 '12 at 1:57

1 Answer 1

I do not believe that's the case. The actual requirement is only that "...f shall allow no exceptions if every function it directly invokes allows no exceptions."

As noted just above (§15.4/12):

An exception-specification is non-throwing if it is of the form throw(), noexcept, or noexcept(constant-expression) where the constant-expression yields true. A function with a non-throwing exception-specification does not allow any exceptions.

It's not exactly a revelation that a non-throwing exception specification does not allow any exceptions, but I think it's telling that the wording in the description of a non-throwing exception specification is echoed nearly verbatim in the requirement on the implicitly declared special member function. As such, it appears to me that any form of non-throwing exception specification (throw() or noexcept or noexcept(<anything that converts to true>)) is allowed -- and that this was specifically intended, not just an accident of wording.

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I can see how you can read it this way, but given the difference in semantics between noexcept and throw(), it would be nice if the standard were more precise about which is used to express the notion that the function doesn't throw. –  KnowItAllWannabe Oct 24 '12 at 16:13

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