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Let's say that a query result is supposed to return a list of string pairs (x, y). I am trying to eliminate the reverse duplicates. What I mean is, if (x, y) was one of the results, (y, x) should not appear later.

example:

column 1 (foreign key)    column 2 (int)     column 3 (string)
4                         50                 Bob
2                         70                 Steve 
3                         50                 Joe

The people represented in this table can appear multiple times with a different column 2 value.

My query needs to print every pair of names that have the same column 2 value :

select e.column3, f.column3 from example as e, example as f where e.column2 = f.column2 

(Bob, Bob)
(Bob, Joe)
(Joe, Bob)
(Joe, Joe)

I upgraded the query so that it removes the doubles:

select e.column3, f.column3 from example as e, example as f where e.column2 = f.column2
       and e.column3 <> f.column3

(Bob, Joe)
(Joe, Bob)

Now I want it to only return:

(Bob, Joe). 

(Joe, Bob) is a reverse duplicate, so I don't want it in the result. Is there anyway to handle that in one query?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First of all, welcome to 2012. We have migrated away from relating tables using commas. It was introdued in ANSI 89 but is severely lacking. Nowaways, the correct way is to write queries using the ANSI 92/99/2003 JOIN syntax.

The solution to your problem is to turn your bidirectional inequality <> into a unidirectional inequality, either < or > whichever you prefer.

select e.column3, f.column3
from example as e
join example as f on e.column2 = f.column2 and e.column3 < f.column3
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Can you explain why that worked? The <> was meant to stop the two names from being equal. Why does < or > do the trick? –  Gregory-Turtle Oct 24 '12 at 1:54
1  
<> means that given two items X and Y, X can sit on either side and Y the other, so you get both (X,Y) and (Y,X). When you restrict the gate in a single direction, e.g. X < Y, then given any two items, only the "lesser" item can sit on the left side thereby removing the other half of the pair. –  RichardTheKiwi Oct 24 '12 at 1:56
select e.column3, f.column3 from example as e, example as f where e.column2 = f.column2
       and e.column3 <> f.column3 where e.id < f.id

adding a simple where clause should do it.

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My apologies. In my actual case, there is no primary key. It is actually a foreign key that can appear more than once in that table column. The same person can be in the table multiple times with different column 2 values. I will edit. –  Gregory-Turtle Oct 24 '12 at 1:46
1  
THen RichardTheKiwi's response is probably what your after. –  xQbert Oct 24 '12 at 1:51

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