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While I was trying to remove duplicate items from List using .NET 2.0, I could not get the expected result.

    List<Student> list1 = new List<Student>();

    Student s = new Student();
    s.Age = "35";
    s.Name = "Nazmul";
    list1.Add(s);

    s = new Student();
    s.Age = "35";
    s.Name = "Nazmul";
    list1.Add(s);

    s = new Student();
    s.Age = "35";
    s.Name = "Nazmul";
    list1.Add(s);

    s = new Student();
    s.Age = "35";
    s.Name = "Nazmul";
    list1.Add(s);

    IComparer<Student> compare = new MyOrderingClass();

    list1.Sort(compare);
    Int32 index = 0;

    while (index < list1.Count - 1)
    {

        if (list1[index].Equals(list1[index + 1]))
        {
            list1.RemoveAt(index);
        }
        else
        {
            index++;
        }
    }

    foreach (Student st in list1)
    {

        Response.Write("Name:" + st.Name);
        Response.Write("Age:" + st.Age + "<br/>");
    }

The class and method used above are listed below:

public class Student
{
    private String name;
    private String age;
    public String Name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set { name = value; }
    }
    public String Age { 
        get { return age; } 
        set { age = value; } 
    }
}

public class MyOrderingClass : IComparer<Student>
{
    public int Compare(Student x, Student y)
    {
        int compareName = x.Name.CompareTo(y.Name);
        if (compareName == 0)
        {
            return x.Age.CompareTo(y.Age);
        }
        return compareName;
    }
}

I am getting all the list item as output. Wondering where I am doing wrong.

share|improve this question
    
@LukeMcGregor, does .Net 2.0 support Distinct? –  Hoque Oct 24 '12 at 4:19
2  
First of all NEVER change a List (IEnumerable) when you are iterating through it. –  Ganesh R. Oct 24 '12 at 4:20
    
@LukeMcGregor I think Distinct is a Linq feature introduced in .NET 3.0 –  Ganesh R. Oct 24 '12 at 4:20
    
if (list1[index].Equals(list1[index + 1])) never return true, you need override Student.Equals with your values –  Mate Oct 24 '12 at 4:22
1  
Default equals only supports reference equality.this may be useful msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/library/bsc2ak47(v=vs.80).aspx –  pmtamal Oct 24 '12 at 4:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In .NET 2.0 you can use Dictionary<> class to get distinct values. Probably it will be most efficient approach using out of box functionality. Obviously in .NET 3.5 and higher use Distinct extension method. Here I added .NET 2.0 implementation.

public class Student : IEquatable<Student>
{
    private String name;
    private String age;
    public String Name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set { name = value; }
    }
    public String Age
    {
        get { return age; }
        set { age = value; }
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int hash = 17;

            hash = hash * 23 + ((Age == null) ? 0 : Age.GetHashCode());
            hash = hash * 23 + ((Name == null) ? 0 : Name.GetHashCode());

            return hash;
        }
    }

    public bool Equals(Student other)
    {
        if (other == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return Age == other.Age && Name == other.Name;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
         if (obj == null) return false;
         if (obj.GetType() != typeof(Student)) return false;

         return Equals((Student)obj);
    }
}

Dictionary<Student, bool> dict = new Dictionary<Student, bool>();

foreach (Student student in list1)
{
    if (!dict.ContainsKey(student))
    {
        dict.Add(student, false);
    }
}

ICollection<Student> distinctList = dict.Keys;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much. What is the purpose of GetHashCode()? –  Hoque Oct 24 '12 at 5:11
    
    
@KirillPolishchuk - you didn't override Object.Equals in this example. –  codekaizen Oct 24 '12 at 5:45
    
@codekaizen, In this particular case object.Equals won't be called. –  Kirill Polishchuk Oct 24 '12 at 6:36
    
@Hoque - while true in this case, it would be defensive to put it in. Leaving 2 different implementations of equality in a single class is very poor design. –  codekaizen Oct 24 '12 at 6:42

The core idea you are looking at can be described with an operation - equality - and a data structure - the set.

First, the operation.

Your class MyOrderingClass is close to being what you want here. Instead of IComparer<Student>, you could use IEqualityComparer<Student> which provides a way to determine if two instances are equal. There are two methods which are needed to determine this: Equals, of course, and GetHashCode which is a sort of "shortcut" method used by some data structures to see if instances are possibly equal. The important thing to note here is that the implementation of GetHashCode involves the same values which are used in determining equality.

public class MyOrderingClass : IEqualityComparer<Student>, IComparer<Student>
{   
    public int Compare(Student x, Student y)   
    {   
        if (ReferenceEquals(x, y))
        {
            return 0;
        }

        if (ReferenceEquals(x, null))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("x");
        }

        if (ReferenceEquals(y, null))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("y");
        }

        // Optional: use StringComparer.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase.CompareTo or maybe others 
        // from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.stringcomparer.aspx
        int compareName = x.Name.CompareTo(y.Name);

        if (compareName == 0)   
        {   
            return x.Age.CompareTo(y.Age);   
        }   

        return compareName;   
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Student student)
    {
        if(student == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("student");
        }

        unchecked
        {
            return (student.Name ?? String.Empty).GetHashCode() ^ student.Age;
        }
    }

    public bool Equals(Student x, Student y)
    {
        return Compare(x, y) == 0;
    }
}   

Second, the data structure.

The idea of having a collection of distinct objects can be accomplished by using the Distinct extension method, but it could be helpful to look at an implementation of ISet<T> - HashSet<T>. The reason for this is that the concept of "distinct elements" is really a definition of the concept of a set - unique elements which belong together. The HashSet<T> uses an instance of an IEqualityComparer<T> - by default it uses EqualityComparer<T>.Default which does referential equality. Of course you can supply your own, like your newly enhanced MyOrderingClass. It turns out that the Distinct method uses a hash-based set to keep track of elements it's already seen and yielded, and to that end it can take an instance of IEqualityComparer<T> which it passes to this internal set.

So now that we have examined the fundamental concepts, let's see the code:

List<Student> list1 = new List<Student>();

// ... add instances with the same name and age

// option 1: use HashSet<T>
var set = new HashSet<Student>(list1, new MyOrderingClass());
Assert.Equal(1, set.Count);

// option 2: use Distinct
var distinct = list1.Distinct(new MyOrderingClass());
Assert.Equal(1, distinct.Count());

// option 3: when you don't have a proper set (e.g. .Net 2.0)
Dictionary<Student, Object> d = new Dictionary<Student, Object>(new MyOrderingClass());
list1.ForEach(delegate(Student e) { d[e] = null; });
Assert.Equal(1, d.Count);
share|improve this answer
    
Are "HashSet" and "Distinct" available in .NET 2.0? –  Hoque Oct 24 '12 at 5:15
    
No. You need to use some other implementation like Iesi HashedSet (nuget.org/packages/Iesi.Collections) or a Dictionary<K, V> where you only use the keys and not the values. The remainder is the same. –  codekaizen Oct 24 '12 at 5:16
    
But honestly, and I know you probably don't have a choice, you guys need to get off 2.0! –  codekaizen Oct 24 '12 at 5:16
    
I added "option 3" to cover using a Dictionary. –  codekaizen Oct 24 '12 at 5:20

pmtamal mentioned : Default equals only supports reference equality.this may be useful http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/library/bsc2ak47(v=vs.80).aspx

       public class Student
            {
                private String name;
                private String age;
                public String Name
                {
                    get { return name; }
                    set { name = value; }
                }
                public String Age
                {
                    get { return age; }
                    set { age = value; }
                }

                public override bool Equals(object obj)
                {
                    Student st = obj as Student;
                    if(st != null ){
                        return (this.name.Trim().ToLower().Equals(st.name.Trim().ToLower()) && this.age == st.age);
                    }
                    return base.Equals(obj);
                }

                public override int GetHashCode()
                {
                   return base.GetHashCode();
                }


            }
share|improve this answer
    
your equal does not take into consideration the age of the student, –  Ganesh R. Oct 24 '12 at 4:28
    
Yes, i said before... "with your values". I guess @Hoque will add the conditions you need to say that they are equal. Thank for the observation Ganesh R. :) –  Mate Oct 24 '12 at 4:32
    
@Mate, trying your code. Thank you so much. –  Hoque Oct 24 '12 at 4:54
    
@Mate, is there any requirement to override GetHashCode() –  Hoque Oct 24 '12 at 5:03
    
No really for this code... but has mentioned codekaizen, GetHashCode which is a sort of "shortcut" method used by some data structures to see if instances are possibly equal. With another object structure is useful –  Mate Oct 24 '12 at 5:06

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