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I've seen this example:

hello=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day
echo ${hello//[0-9]/}

Which follows this syntax: ${variable//pattern/replacement}

Unfortunately the pattern field doesn't seem to support full regex syntax (if I use . or \s, for example, it tries to match the literal characters).

How can I search/replace a string using full regex syntax?

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Found a related question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5658085/… –  jheddings Oct 24 '12 at 5:37
    
FYI, \s isn't part of standard POSIX-defined regular expression syntax (neither BRE or ERE); it's a PCRE extension, and mostly not available from shell. [[:space:]] is the more universal equivalent. –  Charles Duffy Jul 8 at 16:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Use sed:

MYVAR=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day
echo $MYVAR | sed -e 's/[a-zA-Z]/X/g' -e 's/[0-9]/N/g'
# prints XXNNNNNXXXXNNNNNXXXNNNXNNXNNNNXXXXXXNNNNNXXX

Note that the subsequent -e's are processed in order. Also, the g flag for the expression will match all occurrences in the input.

You can also pick your favorite tool using this method, i.e. perl, awk, e.g.:

echo $MYVAR | perl -pe 's/[a-zA-Z]/X/g and s/[0-9]/N/g'

This may allow you to do more creative matches... For example, in the snip above, the numeric replacement would not be used unless there was a match on the first expression (due to lazy and evaluation). And of course, you have the full language support of Perl to do your bidding...

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This only does a single replace as far as I can tell. Is there a way to have it replace all occurances of the pattern like what the code I posted does? –  Lanaru Oct 24 '12 at 5:21
    
I've updated my answer to demonstrate multiple replacements as well as global pattern matching. Let me know if that helps. –  jheddings Oct 24 '12 at 5:28
    
Thanks so much! Out of curiosity, why did you switch from a one line version (in your original answer) to a two-liner? –  Lanaru Oct 24 '12 at 5:30
    
Just trying to match your original question more closely... –  jheddings Oct 24 '12 at 5:43
    
Is there a reason you're using an all-caps MYVAR? Best practice is to save all-caps for environment variables and shell built-ins, thereby avoiding namespace conflicts. –  Charles Duffy Mar 9 at 15:34

This actually can be done in pure bash:

hello=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day
re='(.*)[0-9]+(.*)'
while [[ $hello =~ $re ]]; do
  hello=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
done
echo "$hello"

...yields...

howareyoudoingtodday
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Something tells me you will love these: stackoverflow.com/questions/5624969/… =) –  nickl- Mar 10 at 10:03
1  
That is just completely insane, and awesome at the same time... –  wich Apr 9 at 7:59

These examples also work in bash no need to use sed:

#!/bin/bash
MYVAR=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day
MYVAR=${MYVAR//[a-zA-Z]/X} 
echo ${MYVAR//[0-9]/N}

you can also use the character class bracket expressions

#!/bin/bash
MYVAR=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day
MYVAR=${MYVAR//[[:alpha:]]/X} 
echo ${MYVAR//[[:digit:]]/N}

output

XXNNNNNXXXXNNNNNXXXNNNXNNXNNNNXXXXXXNNNNNXXX

What @Lanaru wanted to know however, if I understand the question correctly, is why the "full" or PCRE extensions \s\S\w\W\d\D etc don't work as supported in php ruby python etc. These extensions are from Perl-compatible regular expressions (PCRE) and may not be compatible with other forms of shell based regular expressions.

These don't work:

#!/bin/bash
hello=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day
echo ${hello//\d/}


#!/bin/bash
hello=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day
echo $hello | sed 's/\d//g'

output with all literal "d" characters removed

ho02123ware38384you44334o3434ingto38384ay

but the following does work as expected

#!/bin/bash
hello=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day
echo $hello | perl -pe 's/\d//g'

output

howareyoudoingtodday

Hope that clarifies things a bit more but if you are not confused yet why don't you try this on Mac OS X which has the REG_ENHANCED flag enabled:

#!/bin/bash
MYVAR=ho02123ware38384you443d34o3434ingtod38384day;
echo $MYVAR | grep -o -E '\d'

On most flavours of *nix you will only see the following output:

d
d
d

nJoy!

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1  
Pardon? ${foo//$bar/$baz} is not POSIX.2 BRE or ERE syntax -- it's fnmatch()-style pattern matching. –  Charles Duffy Mar 7 at 21:52
1  
...so, whereas ${hello//[[:digit:]]/} works, if we wanted to filter out only digits preceded by the letter o, ${hello//o[[:digit:]]*} would have an entirely different behavior than the one expected (since in fnmatch patterns, * matches all characters, rather than modifying the immediately prior item to be 0-or-more). –  Charles Duffy Mar 7 at 22:01
1  
See pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/… (and all that it incorporates by reference) for the full spec on fnmatch. –  Charles Duffy Mar 7 at 22:02
    
The point it was trying to get across is that it is not PCRE, thank you for the info will investigate. –  nickl- Mar 10 at 4:22
    
man bash: An additional binary operator, =~, is available, with the same precedence as == and !=. When it is used, the string to the right of the operator is considered an extended regular expression and matched accordingly (as in regex(3)). –  nickl- Mar 10 at 4:22

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