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I have a Movie model with around 15,000 items and a Dvd model with 3500.

The following queries are simple Rails associations using a Crane Postgres db running on Heroku. I'm wondering why the following queries are taking so long, and how could I eventually reduce the time of it.

2012-10-24T05:42:19+00:00 app[postgres]: [30-1] [BLACK] LOG:  duration: 57.914 ms  statement: SELECT  "movies".* FROM "movies"  WHERE "movies"."dvd_id" = 37 ORDER BY scene LIMIT 1
2012-10-24T05:42:20+00:00 app[postgres]: [31-1] [BLACK] LOG:  duration: 77.086 ms  statement: SELECT  "movies".* FROM "movies"  WHERE "movies"."dvd_id" = 915 ORDER BY scene LIMIT 1
2012-10-24T05:42:20+00:00 app[postgres]: [32-1] [BLACK] LOG:  duration: 85.602 ms  statement: SELECT  "movies".* FROM "movies"  WHERE "movies"."dvd_id" = 108 ORDER BY scene LIMIT 1
2012-10-24T05:42:21+00:00 app[postgres]: [33-1] [BLACK] LOG:  duration: 70.147 ms  statement: SELECT  "movies".* FROM "movies"  WHERE "movies"."dvd_id" = 11 ORDER BY scene LIMIT 1
2012-10-24T05:42:21+00:00 app[postgres]: [34-1] [BLACK] LOG:  duration: 144.204 ms  statement: SELECT  "movies".* FROM "movies"  WHERE "movies"."dvd_id" = 6 ORDER BY scene LIMIT 1
2012-10-24T05:42:22+00:00 app[postgres]: [35-1] [BLACK] LOG:  duration: 56.623 ms  statement: SELECT  "movies".* FROM "movies"  WHERE "movies"."dvd_id" = 1956 ORDER BY scene LIMIT 1
2012-10-24T05:42:23+00:00 app[postgres]: [36-1] [BLACK] LOG:  duration: 64.860 ms  statement: SELECT  "movies".* FROM "movies"  WHERE "movies"."dvd_id" = 747 ORDER BY scene LIMIT 1
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Please show EXPLAIN (BUFFERS, ANALYZE) and other info as requested here: stackoverflow.com/tags/postgresql-performance/info –  Craig Ringer Oct 24 '12 at 6:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can connect directly to your database CLI and then use the PostgresQL EXPLAIN command to get information on how it's running your query. This can show places where you can add indices to your tables to speed things up. The Postgres docs explain (see what I did there?) EXPLAIN in more detail.

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What is your code that is responsible for these queries? Are you using eager loading? Your query should be something like:

DVD.includes(:moves).where(whatever) #assuming DVD has many movies

This should reduce the number of queries/requests. to your database. Your queries suggest that you may have a N+1 problem.

You should also have a database index on the movies table for dvd_id as it is a foreign key.

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Make sure you at least have index on dvd_id. If you can create compound index on (dvd_id, scene), your query will be fully optimal and cannot be optimized any further.

In other words, just execute

CREATE INDEX movies_dvd_id_scene_idx ON movies (dvd_id, scene);

and you should be all set

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You say "fully optimal" as if such a thing could be determined in the abstract instead of by rigorous testing with actual data, production query corpse, and the constraints of the hardware the system runs on. For example: adding a second field to the index makes the key size bigger, reducing key density in the index blocks. This can make it harder to fully cache the index or cause the index tree depth to increase sooner requiring extra seeks to satisfy the queries. If the average cardinality of scenes/dvd_id is close to one, the extra field will almost never be a benefit. –  dbenhur Oct 24 '12 at 6:38
    
I agree in general. But, in this case, considering amount of data (just 15k rows), using this recipe cannot possibly hurt, and will not need any revising and re-asking for more information from OP. In this sense, it is fully optimal. –  mvp Oct 24 '12 at 6:43

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