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does anybody know what this vi command means?

am very new with Linux and i was asked to explain what it does but am getting an error message

any idea what it means or why am i getting this error?

:s/1,$/ABC/CBS

error message

E488: Trailing characters
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The command :s/1,$/ABC/CBS means, replace the 1, at the end of line by ABC with unknown modifier CBS. Due to this unknown modifier its a wrong command

If it would have been like :1,$ s/ABC/CBS/, It would mean, replace the first ABC with CBS for each line starting from line 1 to the last line ($) of the file

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thank you, yeah, it seems like my professor has a typo with this assignment, thanks a lot! you just make my day! –  elizabeth Oct 24 '12 at 7:07

It should probably be:

:1,$s/ABC/CBS

i.e. replace the first occurrence of ABC by CBS on every line in the file.

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everywhere is not quite true; in every line, but only the first occurrence. else, the /g modifier would be necessary. and the trailing slash is missing. –  Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 24 '12 at 6:10
    
Nope. it wont replace every ABCs with CBS. It'll replace only the first one. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Oct 24 '12 at 6:10
    
Indeed, my point was more about the typo than the precise meaning but answer corrected. Thanks for pointing that. –  jlliagre Oct 24 '12 at 6:23

this is a command to replace 'aa' with 'bb':

:s/aa/bb/

your code actually tries to replace '1,' at the end of the line with 'ABC'

the error you get means that 'CBS' is not a valid trailing flag. Flags I use are:

g for global
c for ask confirmation
I for ignore case 

for more info, please check this link

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