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Study question is to find the digit root of a already provided number. The teacher provides us with the number 2638. In order to find the digit root you have to add each digit separately 2 + 6 + 3 + 8 = 19. Then you take the result 19 and add those two digits together 1 + 9 = 10. Do the same thing again 1 + 0 = 1. The digit root is 1.

My first step was to use the variable total to add up the number 2638 to find the total of 19. Then I tried to use the second while loop to separate the two digits by using the %

I have to try and solve the problem by using basic integer arithmetic (+, -, *, /).
1.Is it necessary and or possible to solve the problem using nested while loops?
2.Is my math correct?
3. As I wrote it here it does not run in Eclipse. Am I using the while loops correctly?

import acm.program.*;


public class Ch4Q7 extends ConsoleProgram {
   public void run(){
      println("This program attempts to find the digit root of your number: ");

      int n = readInt("Please enter your number: "); 

      int total = 0;

      int root = total;


      while (n > 0 ){
        total = total + (n %10);
    n = (n / 10);

    }   

   while ( total > 0 ){
     root = total; 
     total = ((total % 10) + total / 10); 
    }


     println("your root should be " + root);
}

}

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2  
The algorithm is recursive in nature, so think about modelling it that way in your program as well. –  pap Oct 24 '12 at 6:30
    
thanks. I don't know if i can combine both while loops and still make it work correctly. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 6:39
    
Are you getting the answer correct? –  Bhavik Shah Oct 24 '12 at 6:40
    
You can move that while loop in a method, and make that method call recursive with new numbers. –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 6:41
    
is % a basic arithmetic? –  Oleg Mikheev Oct 24 '12 at 6:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think it does run, but just a bit too much :-)

total = ((total % 10) + total / 10); 

can't converge to 0. Also, your program as it is will only handle very specific cases. As others pointed out, this can be solved recursively, but also with just a double loop. A succession of loops like you tried won't work.

Try this (on input vars are the same as in your program, it's really a plugin replacement for your two loops):

    do {
        while (n > 0) {
            total = total + (n % 10);
            n = (n / 10);
        }
        n = total;
        total = 0;
    } while (n > 9);  // need at least 1 more loop

After this loop n will contain the root number.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I'll be studying your suggestion. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 7:13
    
root is never updated in your code. –  user93353 Oct 24 '12 at 7:31
    
@user93353 indeed, as stated at the end of the solution the root will be available in variable n. –  fvu Oct 24 '12 at 8:10
    
@user93353 i did not get a chance to run the code so far. After i wrote my code it did not work properly in Eclipse and I was doing other homework assignments. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 9:57
    
@JessicaM. My question was directed at jvu, not you :-) –  user93353 Oct 24 '12 at 10:08

A recursive solution:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    System.out.println(getDigitRoot(1));
    System.out.println(getDigitRoot(11));
    System.out.println(getDigitRoot(1924));
    System.out.println(getDigitRoot(2638));
}

public static int getDigitRoot(int n)
{
    if (n < 10)
    {
        return n;
    }
    int sum = 0;
    while (n > 0)
    {
        sum += n % 10;
        n = n / 10;
    }
    return getDigitRoot(sum);
}

Outputs:

1
2
7
1

I'm of two minds about recursion in this one. It more closely follows what you're doing when manually solving it and as such makes sense, however it's not too hard to implement iteratively and as usual that's more scalable. I think in most cases it won't matter since performance is unlikely to be critical and you're unlikely to deal with numbers large enough to cause a problem for recursion.

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Thanks for the example. Other people have suggested this problem could be solved though recursion but I was not sure what they were referring to. Our class has not covered recursion so far but thanks for the example. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 11:22
    
This is a bad recursion example as it has a while loop that calculates the final answer before the first recursion call. I've added an example in my post. –  Ofir Luzon Oct 31 '12 at 12:14
    
If by that you mean it's not purely recursive, then yes, you're right. But it performs better than a purely recursive method so I'd disagree it's "bad", and you can't argue it's not a recursive method. The reason I did it this way is because it's really easy to read as it performs the calculation in exactly the way you'd do it with a pen and paper, which also makes it easier to debug if you need to. –  Thor84no Oct 31 '12 at 13:12

You can sum only last digit until you get a one digit number:

public static int getRoot(int n) {
    int root=n;
    while ( (root=((root%10) + root/10))>9  );
    return root;
}  

Or with recursion:

public static int recursionGetRoot(int n) {
    if(n<10)
        return n;
    return n%10 + recursionGetRoot(n/10);
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for trying to help my solve the problem. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 7:24

Make a loop to check if your number is more than or equal to 10, i.e. it has more than one digit. Do your digit addition in an inner loop. Print the your intermediate results to check whether your math is correct, i.e. print the digits you extract and the sums. You can remove this later if you like. When your number is less than 10, you have your root.

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I'll definitely do that. Thanks. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 7:10

Why don't you test it yourself? Here's a very simple way to write some test (e.g. comparisions between actual results and expected results) and the math is correct if all those tests pass.

First we need to extract the math in a separate method, because we need something that takes input and provides output:

public void run(){
  println("This program attempts to find the digit root of your number: ");

  int n = readInt("Please enter your number: "); 

  int root = calculateRoot(n);    

  println("your total should be " + root);
}

public static int calculateRoot(int n) {
  int total = 0;
  int root = total;
  while (n > 0 ){
    total = total + (n %10);
    n = (n / 10);
  }   

  while ( total > 0 ){
    root = total; 
    total = ((total % 10) + total / 10); 
  }

  return root;
}

And with that at hand, we can create a main method to execute some tests:

public static void main(String[] args) {

  if (0 == calculateRoot(0)) {
    System.out.println("0: OK");
  }

  if (1234 == calculateRoot(10)) {
    System.out.println("1234: OK");
  }

  // and so on

}

So just implement your algorithm and execute the class and verify by the output, that all tests are OK. This is VERY simplified and later you'll use special test tools but the general approach will be the same: define some test cases and code until all the implementation passes all tests.

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Thanks our class has not learned how to create tests out for our problems so far. I tried to do the math on paper and it seems to work. I'm just not sure if i correctly translated the correct answer into Java. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 6:56
    
Did you actually run your program? It hangs for any input. It goes into an infinite loop in while ( total > 0 ) because total is never going to be >0 –  user93353 Oct 24 '12 at 7:23
    
Meant to write 'because total is always going to be >0' –  user93353 Oct 24 '12 at 7:32
    
@JessicaM., that's why I kept it really simple. The only additional things you have to know is how to create a method. The rest is more or less conceptual –  Andreas_D Oct 24 '12 at 7:35
1  
@user93353 - me? no. I just refactored the code from above. The idea was not to correct the code but show a way that helps to spot the problems (= testing) –  Andreas_D Oct 24 '12 at 7:36

2.Is my math correct? Yes 3. As I wrote it here it does not run in Eclipse. Am I using the while loops correctly? No 1.Is it necessary and or possible to solve the problem using nested while loops?

Yes it is possible using nested loops as the answers given by fvu above

do {
    while (n > 0) {
        total = total + (n % 10);
        n = (n / 10);
    }
    n = total;
    total = 0;
} while (n > 9); 

Is it necessary using nested loop. No you can use recursion

public static void run(){
      System.out.println("This program attempts to find the digit root of your number: ");

      //int n = 234567; 

      int total = 23456;

    //  int root = total;


          total=Test.calctotal(total);

      System.out.println("Root:"+total);
}
public static int calctotal(int n)
{
    int total=0;
    System.out.println(n);
    if(n>9)
    {
        while (n > 0 ){
            total = total + (n %10);
            n = (n / 10);
        }  
        total=Test.calctotal(total);
    }
            else
                total=n;
    return total;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'll take some time to study your suggestion. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 7:14
    
Did you actually run your program? It always returns 0 - because for any n <= 9, calctotal always returns 0. So the final recursive call will always return 0. if n <= 9, you need to return n –  user93353 Oct 24 '12 at 7:29
    
@user93353 done man..I actually did slight changes while posting here. –  Bhavik Shah Oct 24 '12 at 10:55
    
@JessicaM. note the addition of else in calctotal() –  Bhavik Shah Oct 24 '12 at 10:55
    
Yes i do. Thanks I'll take some time and look more closely at it. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 11:52
  int root = 0;
  int t = 0;

  while (true)
  {
    root = root + (n %10);
    t = n/10;
    n = t;

    if(t == 0)
    {
        if(root < 10)
            break;

        n = root;
        root = 0;
    }
}   

or even simpler

int root = 0;

while (n > 0)
{
    root = root + n%10;
    n = n/10;
}

if((root == 0) || (root%9 != 0))
    root = root%9;
else
    root = 9;        
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for trying to help me figure it out. –  Jessica M. Oct 24 '12 at 7:19
    
@user93353 the second variant doesn't solve the problem correctly, try it with 9999 (correct result = 9+9+9+9 = 36 = 3+6 = 9) –  fvu Oct 24 '12 at 12:21
    
@fvu fixed. Thank you. –  user93353 Oct 24 '12 at 12:34

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