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My object is a dictionary with about 1 milion objects inside({} with {}, sometimes {{},{{}},{}...}

While running over the items using FOR loops, I get an error with the following lines:

lines = fp.readlines()
MemoryError: Fatal Python error: PyEval_RestoreThread: NULL tstate

I have about 5 to 6 actions to do on this object. Trying to do all in one for iteration loop - triggers this error. Running on separated loops (each loop does one action) - the first two loops are working great, but, always at the third time I'm running the loop (about after 80,000 iterations) Python crashes (memory error as above).

I changed the actions order - means changed the loops-order, it always fails at the third 'for' loop...

I tried using a stronger & faster machine and still gets these errors.

Please advise.

P.S

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It looks like a threading bug. What packages are you using? –  Sheena Oct 24 '12 at 6:58
    
@Dolphinet: Please consider marking an answer as accepted if one of them solved your problem, –  Niklas R Jan 22 '13 at 0:06

3 Answers 3

I guess its just too much for your RAM. You should really make the actions in one for-loop if possible and optimize your iteration for memory efficiency.

fp.readlines()

Uh, that reads in all lines of the file at once and therefore all its content lies in memory. I don't know about the details, the way you convert the files' content to a dictionary. But if it relies on the lines in the file, you can simply iterate over the file which yields a new line each iteration-step.

for line in fp:
    # ...

However, if you again store all the information from the file in a dictionary, you're facing the same problem once again.

Optimizing the data you stored in memory by checking for (if possible) duplicates is CPU intensive but it may be necessary to lower memory usage.


The difference between consistent storage and generators should be obvious after these two snippets doing the same operation, but the former more memory intensive than the latter. Note that the iterate_to is an exactly duplicate of the range/xrange function and just serves a demonstrative purpose.

def iterate_to(num):
    list_ = []
    for i in xrange(num):
        list_.append(i)
    return list_

def operate_on(num):
    list_ = []
    for i in iterate_to(num):
        x = (i ** i + 5) / (i * 2)
        list_.append(x)
    return list_

print sum(operate_on(1000000))

While the sum function sums up each element in the list returned by operate_on, two lists with each 1000000 entries (!!) are consistent in memory. You might already think that it could be done a little more memory efficient.

def iterate_to(num):
    for i in xrange(num):
        yield i

def operate_on(num):
    for i in iterate_to(num):
        x = (i ** i + 5) / (i * 2)
        yield x

print sum(operate_on(1000000))

In this example, the expression yield is used to make both, the iterate_to and the operate_on function a generator function. While iterating, each iteration-step, the next element of the iteration is calculated directly instead of relying on a previously constructed collection of items.
More on generators here.

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Hi, thank you for your answer. At the beginning of script, I do read a text fie into a dictionary. This is working OK and from that moment I do not use the file anymore. Later on, I start running on my dictionary, and the error with the fp.readlines() appears - but there is no file involved at this time. Doing all actions in one FOR loop is not working (Same crash). Separating it to different loops - works for the first two loops. Is there a way to "clean memory" after each loop is done? Thanks again –  Dolphinet Oct 24 '12 at 7:04
1  
I think that if your algorithm allows you to process 1 line at a tine, without building monstrous dictionary - that what you should do. –  volcano Oct 24 '12 at 7:11
1  
@Dolphinet It may be possible that at the first iteration, you're allocating new memory blocks that are not yet freed when the next iteration starts. Computation usually ends with a result. The result must be stored somewhere (usually in memory). Try to minimize memory usage by using generators instead of consistent storage if possible for your operations. –  Niklas R Oct 24 '12 at 7:15
    
Niklas R - can you please explain what you mean by using generators instead of consistent storage? Thank you. Volcano - I cannot do it. My project is huge (about two years work). Until today we worked with files up to 500K lines and had no problems. Today we need to support 1M lines... Is there any other way? Why the first two iterations are working? What can I do in order to make it work at the 3ed,4th and 5th time? Thank you –  Dolphinet Oct 24 '12 at 7:16
    
The way you can optimite an algorithm depends 99% on the algorithm itself. Its hard to give a general answer for optimizing an algorithm without knowing details of it, besides the usual tips. I'll edit my answer to show you the difference between generators and consistent storage. –  Niklas R Oct 24 '12 at 7:23

This is most likely memory problem - python 2.* can not use more than 2Gb of RAM. This may happen due to late garbage collection. Install gc library and try to manually invoke garbage collection after intensive processing bocks, e.g. after each of your FOR loops. Clear memory from your file object after you populated your dictionary with file contents. Anyway, start with looking at memory consumption with top command or task manager.

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I do use python 2.* (2.7). The mem usage after 2 loops is about 0.9GB. At the point pyhton crashes (The third time) - the usage is 1.95GB. I'm about to try your suggestion and learn about the gc library. Thank you. –  Dolphinet Oct 24 '12 at 8:15
    
Runing gc.collect() does not helping :( –  Dolphinet Oct 24 '12 at 9:07
    
I have an update: Apparently,when stop using the dictionary for some of my parameters, means, taking few parameters out into lists [] , instead of dictionary {} , was a good move that saves memory. –  Dolphinet Oct 25 '12 at 11:59

The gc.colletc() did not solve my problem. The change that triggered less memory usage was going over my 1M objects in the one huge {Dictionary} and "move" some of them them into special [Lists] objects. The Mem. Usage is still very high (about 1.7 GB) but currently the script is working and not crashing anymore. Thank you all for your answers, I learned from these replies and it was very helping.

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