Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Out of curiosity, I change the line to set_array(&array1[0]) in the following from set_array[array1], the parameter is not the same type, but it works, any idea?

#include <stdio.h>
void set_array(int array[][9]);
int main(void) {
    int array1[4][9];
    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        for(int j = 0; j < 9; j++) {
            array1[i][j] = j + 1;
        }
    }
    set_array(&array1[0]);
    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        for(int j = 0; j < 9; j++) {
            printf("%d ", *(*(array1 + i) + j));
            //printf("%d ", array1[i][j]);
        }
        puts("\n");
    }
    return 0;

}
void set_array(int array[][9]) {
    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        for(int j = 0; j < 9; j++) {
            array[i][j] = 1;
        }
    }   
};
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

here array1 is having the address of whole array of 1st row(or column)depending upon implementation. (&array1[0])is same as (array1) of type ()[n] sice array name itself contains the address of the ist element .But when you pass (&array) which of type ()[m][n] and compiler will throw an error because mismatch of argument type.

I think you haven't read my comments in the last question you asked

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man, and sorry about missing your comments in my last question – mko Oct 25 '12 at 0:09

In C the plain name of an array is the same as a pointer to its first element. This is called decaying of the array. See the C faq for further explanation.

share|improve this answer
2  
In this context, the name of the array evaluates to a pointer to its first element. In other contexts in C, the two are not the same. – Steve Jessop Oct 24 '12 at 8:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.