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I'm new to Perl, and I've hit a mental roadblock. I need to extract information from a tab delimited file as shown below.

#name  years risk total
 adam  5     100  200
 adam  5     50   100
 adam  10    20   300
 bill  20    5    100
 bill  30    10   800

In this example, the tab delimited file shows length of investment, amount of money risked, and total at the end of investment.

I want to parse through this file, and for each name (e.g. adam), calculate sum of years invested 5+5, and calculate sum of earnings (200-100) + (100-50) + (300-20). I also would like to save the totals for each name (200, 100, 300).

Here's what I have tried so far:

my $filename;
my $seq_fh;

open $seq_fh, $frhitoutput 
    or die "failed to read input file: $!";

while (my $line = <$seq_fh>) {

    chomp $line;
    ## skip comments and blank lines and optional repeat of title line

    next if $line =~ /^\#/ || $line =~ /^\s*$/ || $line =~ /^\+/;

    #split each line into array
    my @line = split(/\s+/, $line);
    my $yeartotal = 0;
    my $earning   = 0;

    #$line[0] = name
    #$line[1] = years
    #$line[2] = start
    #$line[3] = end

    while (@line[0]){

        $yeartotal += $line[1];
        $earning   += ($line[3]-$line[2]);
    }
}

Any ideas of where I went wrong?

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2  
If it's truly tab-delimited, you should be splitting on /\t/ instead of /\s+/. Otherwise, you can't handle empty fields or fields with spaces in them. –  cjm Oct 24 '12 at 8:32
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5 Answers

You're wrong here : while(@line[0]){

I'd do:

my $seq_fh;
my %result;
open($seq_fh, $frhitoutput) || die "failed to read input file: $!";
while (my $line = <$seq_fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    ## skip comments and blank lines and optional repeat of title line
    next if $line =~ /^\#/ || $line =~ /^\s*$/ || $line =~ /^\+/;
    #split each line into array
    my @line = split(/\s+/, $line);
    $result{$line[0]}{yeartotal} += $line[1];
    $result{$line[0]}{earning} += $line[3] - $line[2];
}
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Great! Works perfectly. If I were to save the totals (200, 100, 300), how would I go about doing that? Can hashes have another dimension? –  Steve Hwang Oct 24 '12 at 8:35
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The Text::CSV module can be used to read tab-delimited data. Often much nicer than trying to manually hack yourself something up with split and so on when it comes to things like quoting, escaping, etc..

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You should use hash, something like this:

my %hash;
while (my $line = <>) {

    next if $line =~ /^#/;

    my ($name, $years, $risk, $total) = split /\s+/, $line;

    next unless defined $name and defined $years
            and defined $risk and defined $total;

    $hash{$name}{years}    += $years;
    $hash{$name}{risk}     += $risk;
    $hash{$name}{total}    += $total;
    $hash{$name}{earnings} += $total - $risk;
}

foreach my $name (sort keys %hash) {

    print "$name earned $hash{$name}{earnings} in $hash{$name}{years}\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great! Works perfectly. If I were to save the individual totals (200, 100, 300), how would I go about doing that? Can hashes have another dimension? –  Steve Hwang Oct 24 '12 at 9:04
    
Hash can be as deep as you make it to be. In this case I made it 2 levels deep: name, and then some data like years, totals, etc. But, if you want to save individual records, you need to have something that makes that record unique - that's what hashes are about. –  mvp Oct 24 '12 at 9:10
    
Would I have to create a hash within the hash? –  Steve Hwang Oct 24 '12 at 9:21
    
Actually, you're dealing implicitely with hash references here. It's a hash which contains hash references as values. –  memowe Oct 24 '12 at 9:28
    
I'm stumped. Apparently you can't store unique values in hash references. –  Steve Hwang Oct 24 '12 at 9:57
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Nice opportunity to explore Perl's powerful command line options! :)

Code

Note: this code should be a command line oneliner, but it's a little bit easier to read this way. When writing it in a proper script file, you really should enable strict and warnings and use a little bit better names. This version won't compile under strict, you have to declare our $d.

#!/usr/bin/perl -nal

# collect data
$d{$F[0]}{y} += $F[1];
$d{$F[0]}{e} += $F[3] - $F[2];

# print summary
END { print "$_:\tyears: $d{$_}{y},\tearnings: $d{$_}{e}" for sort keys %d }

Output

adam:   years: 20,  earnings: 430
bill:   years: 50,  earnings: 885

Explanation

I make use of the -n switch here which basically lets your code iterate over the input records (-l tells it to use lines). The -a switch lets perl split the lines into the array @F. Simplified version:

while (defined($_ = <STDIN>)) {
    chomp $_;
    our(@F) = split(' ', $_, 0);

    # collect data
    $d{$F[0]}{y} += $F[1];
    $d{$F[0]}{e} += $F[3] - $F[2];
}

%d is a hash with the names as keys and hashrefs as values, which contain years (y) and earnings (e).

The END block is executed after finishing the input line processing and outputs %d.

Use O's Deparse to view the code which is actually executed:

book:/tmp memowe$ perl -MO=Deparse tsv.pl
BEGIN { $/ = "\n"; $\ = "\n"; }
LINE: while (defined($_ = <ARGV>)) {
    chomp $_;
    our(@F) = split(' ', $_, 0);
    $d{$F[0]}{'y'} += $F[1];
    $d{$F[0]}{'e'} += $F[3] - $F[2];
    sub END {
        print "${_}:\tyears: $d{$_}{'y'},\tearnings: $d{$_}{'e'}" foreach (sort keys %d);
    }
    ;
}
tsv.pl syntax OK
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It seems like a fixed-width file, I would use unpack for that

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