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Sometimes, data migrations are required. As time passes, code changes and migrations using your domain model are no longer valid and migrations fail. What are the best practices for migrating data?

I tried make an example to clarify the problem:

Consider this. You have a migration

class ChangeFromPartnerAppliedToAppliedAt < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    User.all.each do |user|
      user.applied_at = user.partner_application_at
      user.save
   end
 end

this runs perfectly fine, of course. Later, you need a schema change

class AddAcceptanceConfirmedAt < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_column :users, :acceptance_confirmed_at, :datetime
  end
end

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  before_save :do_something_with_acceptance_confirmed_at
end

For you, no problem. It runs perfectly. But if your coworker pulls both these today, not having run the first migration yet, he'll get this error on running the first migration:

rake aborted!
An error has occurred, this and all later migrations canceled:
undefined method `acceptance_confirmed_at=' for #<User:0x007f85902346d8>

That's not being a team player, he'll be fixing the bug you introduced. What should you have done?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Best practice is: don't use models in migrations. Migrations change the way AR maps, so do not use them at all. Do it all with SQL. This way it will always work.

This:

User.all.each do |user|
  user.applied_at = user.partner_application_at
  user.save
end

I would do like this

update "UPDATE users SET applied_at=partner_application_at"
share|improve this answer
    
Seems cleaner than what I was going to suggest, where you get really careful after added/changed columns, and any hooks involving them are wrapped in begin-rescue-end blocks. –  bdares Oct 24 '12 at 8:36
2  
Why is it best practice not to use models in migrations? Any sources to back that up? Salil's answer seems to contradict your statement. –  Mischa Oct 24 '12 at 8:49
2  
It is best practice because inherent changes to schema change the way AR maps attributes. That is, you may be using certain getters/setters/methods in you model implementation which will eventually be updated/removed. That means, if you run migrations from start to finish, they will break. You'll always be dependent of having a stable schema. And of course, my main argument: migrations work on the database, so they should speak in a language understood there. even rails DSL for migrations (create_table, and all that) in the end is translated into raw SQL. Allowing AR models to be instantiated –  ChuckE Oct 24 '12 at 8:55
    
in the migrations is just one more Rails/AR contradiction. –  ChuckE Oct 24 '12 at 8:56
2  
Fine, that's your opinion. No problems with that. But if it's a best practice, as you claim, there must be some sources to back it up. Preferably by Rails-core members. –  Mischa Oct 24 '12 at 9:07

This is a perfect example of the Using Models in Your Migrations

class ChangeFromPartnerAppliedToAppliedAt < ActiveRecord::Migration
  class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  end

  def up
    User.all.each do |user|
      user.applied_at = user.partner_application_at
      user.save
   end
 end

Edited after Mischa's comment

class ChangeFromPartnerAppliedToAppliedAt < ActiveRecord::Migration
  class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  end

  def up
    User.update_all('applied_at = partner_application_at')
  end
 end
share|improve this answer
    
Why there is -ve marking, will some one bother to comment why it's not correct before marked answer to negative? –  Salil Oct 24 '12 at 8:36
    
fabulous answer Salil. Only ignorants would downvote this. I'm just annoyed I didn't think of this solution myself. Brilliant! :) –  oma Oct 24 '12 at 8:41
2  
Whoever downvoted cancelled it already. No worries! And obviously this is the correct answer. Only one remark @oma: I would recommend using User.update_all('applied_at = partner_application_at') instead of User.all.each etc. –  Mischa Oct 24 '12 at 8:42
    
Thanks oma, @Mischa :) –  Salil Oct 24 '12 at 8:46
    
If you do it the way Misha described then you don't need to declare the User class. But if you're doing the way Misha said then you can also do it directly in SQL. or you can use the #reset_column_information method from ActiveRecord::Base and do the first example without declaring the model. guides.rubyonrails.org/… –  ChuckE Oct 24 '12 at 13:56

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