Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a doubt on HTTPS. One of my seniors told me that Https does not actually use SSL/TLS, but only their the encryption algorithms. He says that the handshaking process with certificates are done in the transport layer, but the security key encryption for actual payload is done in the Application layer. And he also said that Https can actually be considered as a presentation layer protocol.

Is he correct?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

HTTPS is specified in RFC 2818: "HTTP Over TLS".

Although the specification is about TLS (because it's an IETF specification, and IETF only uses "TLS"), it's in fact about SSL or TLS, depending on the version of SSL/TLS used (see difference between SSL and TLS).

So yes, HTTPS does use SSL/TLS. As the RFC says:

Conceptually, HTTP/TLS is very simple. Simply use HTTP over TLS precisely as you would use HTTP over TCP.

Essentially, the encryption keys are negotiated during the SSL/TLS handshake, and the HTTP exchange isn't aware of those keys.

If you're not convinced, look at some browser traffic using Wireshark. All you'll see is some SSL/TLS traffic (the HTTP exchanged being encrypted by it).

If you want to analyse some traffic, you can set up your own server and use its private key to look at the normal HTTP exchange on top of SSL/TLS using Wireshark too, as described in the Wireshark SSL page. (You'll need to disable EDH cipher suites, because they provide perfect forward secrecy, which prevent you from deciphering sniffed traffic even if you have the server private key.) This page also has some example HTTPS data you can download and look at with Wireshark, without having to install your own server.

From the browser point of view, you can also look at the traffic as reported by the developer tools (Firebug and so on) when using HTTPS, you'll just see plain HTTP traffic, since the SSL/TLS layer is taken care of by the SSL/TLS library underneath.

I wouldn't stress too much about the OSI layers in general. They look good in theoretical networking classes, but are in fact difficult to apply to the TCP/IP stack (see comparison and "layering considered harmful"), especially when you throw SSL/TLS into it, which is precisely designed to be an invisible layer as far as the application layer is concerned (SSL/TLS usually sits on top of TCP, like any other application protocol on top of TCP, but it sits under any application protocol it protects).

share|improve this answer
add comment

From Wikipedia:

HTTP operates at the highest layer of the OSI Model, the Application layer; but the security protocol operates at a lower sublayer, encrypting an HTTP message prior to transmission and decrypting a message upon arrival.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Https#Network_layers

share|improve this answer
1  
Wikipedia is (a) wrong [I've fixed it] and (b) not a normative reference. The normative reference in this case is RFC 2818. –  EJP Oct 25 '12 at 0:25
add comment

Your senior should be your junior. He doesn't know what he is talking about. Avoid him in future. HTTPS is simply HTTP over SSL, with the minor addition of hostname checking to ensure that the hostname in the certificate agrees with the site you connected to.

Specifically:

One of my seniors told me that Https does not actually use SSL/TLS, but only their the encryption algorithms

Wrong.

He says that the handshaking process with certificates are done in the transport layer

Wrong for both SSL and HTTPS. It is done by the application, typically in a library such as OpenSSL or JSSE. The transport layer only does the TCP part, none of the SSL part.

but the security key encryption for actual payload is done in the Application layer.

Wrong again: payload encryption is done in the application layer for both SSL and HTTPS.

And he also said that Https can actually be considered as a presentation layer protocol.

It is an application layer protocol. There are very few examples of presentation layer protocols (XDR and TN3270 comes to mind). This isn't one of them. But I agree with Bruno. The OSI layers are not applicable to TCP/IP, which has its own layer model, and, since the unlamented demise of the OSI protocol effort, they aren't applicable to anything else either.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.