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Why this code doesn't output anything(exept info word)? File is exist.

hReadFile = CreateFile(L"indexing.xml",GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE, FILE_SHARE_READ |FILE_SHARE_WRITE, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL, NULL);
    wchar_t *wchr = new wchar_t[20];
    DWORD dw;
    ReadFile(hReadFile, wchr, sizeof(wchar_t) * 5, &dw, NULL);
    CloseHandle(hReadFile);
    wchr[dw/sizeof(wchar_t)] = L'\0';
    std::wcout << L"info " << wchr << L"     " << dw << std::endl;
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1  
To start with, you don't terminate the string you read. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 24 '12 at 9:16
    
@Joachim Pileborg Doesn't ReadFile terminate reading data automaticaly? –  Vsevywniy Oct 24 '12 at 9:18
    
@JoachimPileborg: the output would be the string followed by a garbage –  Andrey Oct 24 '12 at 9:20
2  
Many possible reasons but by far the most likely is that you don't open the file successfully. Always test whether you open a file, there are many reasons why this might not work. –  john Oct 24 '12 at 9:26
1  
Would std::wcout << L"info " << (wchr+1) << L" " << dw << std::endl; print what you expect? –  alk Oct 24 '12 at 12:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A Unicode file might start with an optional Byte Order Mark (BOM).

For UTF-16 the BOM tells which endianess is used in the the file.

Also the BOM can be used to destinguish between different Unicode encodings.

The example file from the OP obviously carries such a BOM as its first two bytes, as increasing the pointer (to the 2-byte sized wchar_t typed array) skips it and lets the data be printed.

std::wcout << L"info " << (wchr+1) << L" " << dw << std::endl;
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