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I have a struct, which is composed of multiple 32 bits elements. I applied a #pragma pack (4), the following struct is therefore linear and aligned.

struct
{
  int a; // 4 bytes
  int b; // 4 bytes
  int c; // 4 bytes
} mystruct; // total 16 bytes

How can I swap each of these elements (little -> big endian) ?

The method is void swap(void* a, int b);, with a pointer to the structure, and b integer giving the size of the structure.

For example :

void swap(void* a, int b)
{
  //FIXME !
  for (int i = 0; i < b; i+= 32)
  {
    a = (a & 0x0000FFFF) << 16 | (a & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16;
    a = (a & 0x00FF00FF) << 8 | (a & 0xFF00FF00) >> 8;
    a += 32;
  }
}
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3  
Your element d is not four bytes it's one byte. By using #pragma pack(4) you have forced the compiler to add three padding bytes after element d, but it is still an error for your code to access those bytes. If you really want four bytes what's wrong with char d[4];? –  john Oct 24 '12 at 9:15
    
@john post edited, this is not what I am looking for. Now let's say the struct is only composed of 3 int. –  Patouf Oct 24 '12 at 9:18
    
By the way, your current pragma is probably obsolete, since a struct full of ints is aligned at least to the alignment of int, which is most likely at least 4 bytes. On the other hand I cannot see why you assume the struct to be aligned to 16 bytes (except maybe if you think that #pragma pack considers elements instead of bytes, which it of course doesn't). –  Christian Rau Oct 24 '12 at 9:28
    
Do you mean byte-swapping rather than bit-swapping. endian changing is byte-swapping, not bit. –  CashCow Oct 24 '12 at 9:31
    
@ChristianRau the struct is not full of int, I cleaned the example to make it easier to understand. When by "aligned", I meant that elements of the struct follow each other in the memory –  Patouf Oct 24 '12 at 9:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can swap two bytes without using a temporary:

void byteswap( unsigned char & a, unsigned char & b )
{
   a ^= b;
   b ^= a;
   a ^= b;
}

Now let's apply it to numbers of variable length

template< typename T >
void endianSwap( T & t )
{
    unsigned char * first = reinterpret_cast< unsigned char * >( &t );
    unsigned char * last = first + sizeof(T) - 1;
    while( first < last )
    {
       byteswap( *first, *last );
       ++first;
       --last;
    }
}

For your struct you can:

void endianSwap( mystruct & s )
{
     endianSwap( s.a );
     endianSwap( s.b );
     endianSwap( s.c );
}

Of course, as an alternative to endianSwap using byteswap, we could just use std::reverse.

template<typename T> endianSwap( T& t )
{
    unsigned char * begin = reinterpret_cast<unsigned char *>(&t);
    unsigned char * end = begin + sizeof( T );
    std::reverse( begin, end );
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a possible fix for your routine

void swap(void* a, int b)
{
  for (int i = 0; i < b; i += 4)
  {
    int* p = (char*)a + i;
    *p = (*p & 0x0000FFFF) << 16 | (*p & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16;
    *p = (*p & 0x00FF00FF) << 8 | (*p & 0xFF00FF00) >> 8;
  }
}

Untested, but a bit closer to correct I hope.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's closer, but doesn't work because of signed shift. –  Aki Suihkonen Oct 24 '12 at 9:34

If you are on a *nix based machine. There is a useful functions can do that:

#include <arpa/inet.h>
uint32_t htonl(uint32_t hostint32);   // from host to network
                                      // means little to big if your machine is x86
share|improve this answer
    
if you want to swap to big endian. However if you want to swap from big to little that function won't work. –  CashCow Oct 24 '12 at 9:30
    
So what? There is also ntohl. –  halfelf Oct 24 '12 at 9:32
    
Does this swap only int ? –  Patouf Oct 24 '12 at 9:45
    
@Patouf Basically yes. There is another version for short. –  halfelf Oct 24 '12 at 9:51
    
yes but if you are on a big endian platform it won't work to swap to little endian. Of course, you could use this as implementation for little endian systems. –  CashCow Oct 24 '12 at 10:12

I assume that by little->big endian you mean reversing the order of the bytes in each 4-byte element. I also assume that by "a null pointer on the structure" you mean "a pointer on the structure". There are a few errors in your code. Try this:

void swap(void* a, int b)
{
  for (int *pInt = (int *)a; pInt < ((char *)a + b); pInt++)
  {
    *pInt = (*pInt & 0x0000FFFF) << 16 | (*pInt  & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16;
    *pInt = (*pInt & 0x00FF00FF) << 8 | (*pInt & 0xFF00FF00) >> 8;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
void swap(void* A, int b)
{
   //FIXME !
   int *c = (int*)A; // have to cast to an existing type. 'void' doesnt exist
   for (int i = 0; i < b; i+=4)  // we are flipping 4 bytes at a time
   {
        unsigned int a=*c;  // read the content, not the address
         // have to have unsigned, otherwise (a&0xff00ff00)>>8 extends the sign bit
        a = (a & 0x0000FFFF) << 16 | (a & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16;
        a = (a & 0x00FF00FF) << 8 | (a & 0xFF00FF00) >> 8;
        *c++= a;  // write back the content
   }
 }

Anyway: my favourite way to do byte swapping in c or c-like languages is through a copy: The concept is easier to remember than the name of a builtin function.

void swap(char *d, char *s, int N) { for (i=0;i<N;i++) d[i^3]=*s++;}

share|improve this answer
1  
This code assumes the size b is the size in ints. Might be right, but I think it's more likely to be the size in bytes. –  john Oct 24 '12 at 9:23

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