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So let's say that I'm trying to accomplish a task that will require some form of abstraction.

And this task could be accomplished either by subclassing or by implementing an Interface.

Is there any reason to lean towards either of them?

What about Efficiency wise or Convention wise?

An Example

Subclassing

public abstract class Main {

    public abstract void doSomething();

}
public class SubMain extends Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new SubMain().doSomething();

    }

    @Override
    public void doSomething() {
        System.out.println("Example Method.");

    }

}

And Implementing an Interface

public interface TestInterface {
    public abstract void doSomething();

}
public class MainWithInterface implements TestInterface {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new MainWithInterface().doSomething();

    }

    @Override
    public void doSomething() {
        System.out.println("Example Method.");

    }
}
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3 Answers 3

If interface will work for you, then lean towards it. It gives more freedom to the client of such API since he can implement multiple interfaces with the same class.

There are no performance aspects to consider here. Method dispatch can be considered free for almost any use case.

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You have only methods there, so an interface is more appropriate. If you are concerned only with the behaviour use an interface.

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I tend to lean towards interfaces if I want inherited behaviour, and subclassing if I want inherited structure. If in doubt, between those two, I'd probably look to interfaces as they allow for multiple interface inheritance

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