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The normal way for a class to allow a client to obtain an instance is to provide a public contructor. Another way to do that is providing a public static factory method, which is simply a static method that returns an instance of the class. What are pros and cons by using static factory method?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Everything you need you can get it at one place: -

Effective Java - Item#1 - Consider Static Factory instead of Constructors

It explains all the pros and cons for both of them in the best way you can understand.

Just to quote the advantages and disadvantages from the book: -

Advantages: -

  • One advantage of static factory methods is that, unlike constructors, they have names.
  • A second advantage of static factory methods is that, unlike constructors, they are not required to create a new object each time they’re invoked.
  • A third advantage of static factory methods is that, unlike constructors, they can return an object of any subtype of their return type.
  • A fourth advantage of static factory methods is that they reduce the verbosity of creating parameterized type instances (This one can be ignored in Java 7)

Disadvantages: -

  • The main disadvantage of providing only static factory methods is that classes without public or protected constructors cannot be subclassed

  • A second disadvantage of static factory methods is that they are not readily distinguishable from other static methods.

You can study them in more detail in the link I gave.

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A second advantage of static factory methods is that, unlike constructors, they are not required to create a new object each time they’re invoked. This is NOT always an advantage actually, if may prevent the compiler to properly optimize (since the code path is unknown) and it may be worse if the cpu cannot properly predict the branch. –  bestsss Oct 28 '12 at 11:16
    
The disadvantages don't seem very big if you are against subclassing and have a convention for the naming of factory methods, like newClassName(). –  Thomas Ahle Jul 30 '14 at 10:21

The only con is more code to write, but it's still there, so you need at least some benefit for having a factory.

Factory is not required to always return a new object, that's one advantage.

Factory can instantiate any subclass it wants, that's another.

In my projects I often add factories just to make my client code look nicer. If you use a static import for the factory method, the call looks nicer than a new expression, especially if the name of class is not particularly concise, which is often the case.

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You still need a protected ctor to allow inheritance. Also I kind of disagree about nicer code and ability to return an already existing object - I pretty much prefer to know if an object is newly created or actually cached. If I want to preclude new XXX() just provide interfaces w/o any instances to the client. –  bestsss Oct 28 '12 at 11:24
    
@bestsss Providing a constructor precludes the option of caching: this is a quite blunt tool if the purpose is "letting you know whether the instance is cached". A great many aspects of code remain exactly the same regardless of the caching policy and a factory allows that decoupling to be achieved. If you provide interfaces to the client, then at least one method in those interfaces is a factory method. I don't get your point in this respect. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 28 '12 at 11:32
    
I mean to know if the instance is a cached one while looking at the code. The extra bit of knowledge helps tracing bugs - that's the main reason. As for interfaces - yes, exactly you have a single entry factory point and then it works on interfaces alone, point is from client point of view there are no static methods to use as factories. Stuff like InitialContext don't even use static methods to create the 1st instance, though. –  bestsss Oct 28 '12 at 11:54
    
@bestsss So, how does the code look like that lets you know a cached instance is being returned? BTW I don't see any advantage in new InitialContext vs. ContextFactory.getInstance, except that I know a disadvantage: the latter's return type can be an interface. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 28 '12 at 12:05

Advantage: -One advantages of static factory methods is that, unlike constructors, they have names. -A second advantages of static factory methods is that, unlike constructors, they are not equired to create a new object each time they're invoked. -They can return an object of any subtype of their return type. Disavantage: -The main disadvatage of static factory methods is that classes without public or protected constructors cannot be subclassed. -They are not readily distinguishable from other static methods.

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I would say to the original author of the question that static factory methods are a tool. Like all tools, they have uses for which they are best suited, other uses for which they are passable, and other things for which they are poorly adaptable. To cite a real world example, a hammer is great at driving nails, adequate for jacking open a sealed crate with the nail-removing end (a crowbar would still be much better), but useless for planing down a rough surface.

Factory methods refer to one of a set of creational design patterns, i.e. paradigms for creating objects. In some creational design patterns such as "Builder" and "Prototype", the use of the new operator for object creation isn't merely discouraged, it's considered harmful to the overall design goal. The creational design patterns that people talk about are...

  1. Factory methods
  2. Abstract factory methods
  3. Singleton pattern
  4. Builder
  5. Prototype

Generally speaking, a factory method is used to create an object from a group of related subclasses based on data that the user or designer supplies to the method. More concretely, though, a static factory method gives you control over object creation even when the object that is returned is the same every time. This can be very important when, for example, the process of creating an object is very expensive in terms of time and resources. In a situation like this, using a new operator to create objects might incur a terrible performance penalty.

One solution might be to maintain a reusable pool of objects. By using a static factory method, the application designer can provide logic to return a free, existing object if one is available. This would then save the potentially high cost of building a new object. This is exactly what is done with network database connections by connection managers that provide "connection pooling." Rather than build a new database connection every single time a client makes a request, connection objects are assigned from a pool of existing objects if one is available. This is an example of a circumstance in which using the new operator would actually be harmful to application performance and would undermine the software engineer's design goals.

A good time to consider using a factory method for creating objects rather than the new operator would be:

  • The object that would be created is belongs to one of a few possible subclasses of objects that could be created depending on supplied data.
  • There is a good reason to have more control over the object creation process than would be possible in a constructor, eg. the Singleton design pattern requires a static factory method.

A bad time to consider using a factory method would be:

  • Simple, lightweight objects

It's all about enumerating the software design problems, and then deciding which tools are best for solving it. Static factory methods are good for some things and not so good for others ... just like any tool.

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