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public abstract class IEnvelopeFactory {

    public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue<IEnvelopeFactory>;

    public IEnvelopeFactory() { }

    ~IEnvelopeFactory() { }

    public virtual void Dispose() { }

    /// <summary>
    /// Parsing
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="input"></param>
    /// <param name="envelope"></param>
    public abstract bool Parse(string input, out Envelope envelope);

    /// <summary>
    /// Formatting
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="env"></param>
    /// <param name="envStr"></param>
    public abstract bool Format(Envelope env, out string envStr);
}

I am getting an error as Syntax Error '(' expected in the Line public Queue m_Queue;

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7 Answers

This has nothing to do with it being an abstract class. It's just an invalid variable declaration:

public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue<IEnvelopeFactory>;

What did you expect the second <IEnvelopeFactory> to do? It's specifying the generic type argument for Queue<T>. It should just be:

public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue;

... although ideally you wouldn't have a public field in the first place.

(I'd also recommend against adding a finalizer just for the sake of it. Finalizers are very rarely needed. Also, if you're going to have a Dispose method, why aren't you implementing IDisposable?)

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That is an answer that adds value –  Ngm Oct 24 '12 at 10:39
    
Thanks a lot........it works fine.......... –  DineshKumar BalaSubramanian Oct 24 '12 at 10:48
    
Hi i am getting some error in other classe files like - does not implement inherited abstract member 'CCN.MSG.ENV.IEnvelopeFactory.Format –  DineshKumar BalaSubramanian Oct 24 '12 at 10:58
    
@DineshKumarBalaSubramanian: Well then you should implement it... that's a completely different error. Look at it more closely yourself, and you really can't fix it, ask a new question. –  Jon Skeet Oct 24 '12 at 11:00
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You have already specified the type strongly, no need to add the generic part to the variable name:

public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue;
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Try changing to:

public abstract class IEnvelopeFactory {    
    public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue;
}
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make m_Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> => m_Queue

In other words:

public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue;

if you don't want, for some reason, initialize it immediately.

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Maybe because it should be:

public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue = new Queue<IEnvelopeFactory>();
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Change your code to -

public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue;

Syntax of Queue class -

[SerializableAttribute]
[ComVisibleAttribute(false)]
public class Queue<T> : IEnumerable<T>, ICollection, 
    IEnumerable

You can define a reference variable in class as -

public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue;

You can initialize Queue variable in class -

public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue = new Queue<IEnvelopeFactory>();
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public Queue<IEnvelopeFactory> m_Queue;

That's enough: you've already specified the exact type of the m_Queue variable.

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