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I have an array. The elements in the array are containing semi colon in between them.

Array looks something like this:

@Array = { "AUT;E;1",
           "AUT;E;2",
           "CHE;A;1",
           "CHE;C;4"
         };

I want to split the array elements using ';' (semicolon) as delimiter.

By using hash of hashes I want to store 'AUT' as key and under that want to store E => 1 and E => 2.

i.e I needed the hash as

%HashOfElem = (
         'AUT' => {
                     'E' => 1,
                     'E' => 2
                  },

         'CHE' => {
                     'A' => 1,
                     'C' => 4
                  }
              )

For that purpose I wrote the following code which is not behaving as expected :(

foreach(@Array)
{
    my @TmpArray = split(/;/,$_);

    %HashOfElem = (
              $TmpArray[0] => {
                                  $TmpArray[1] => $TmpArray[2]
                              }
                  );

}

If my approach is wrong then which data structure in perl can be used to achieve above purpose?

Please help..

share|improve this question
7  
Keys are unique in a hash. –  M42 Oct 24 '12 at 11:35
1  
E => 1 and E => 2, both can't be in the same hash. –  Anirudh Ramanathan Oct 24 '12 at 11:37
    
Okay. Then which data structure in perl can be used to achieve above purpose? –  SS Hegde Oct 24 '12 at 11:38
1  
And you don't check if a key $TmpArray[0] exists so you'll clobber existing values. –  dgw Oct 24 '12 at 11:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Note that you're doing wrong assignement to @Array, it should be (parenthesis instead of braces):

updated according to comment:

my @array = (
    "AUT;E;1",
    "AUT;E;2",
    "CHE;A;1",
    "CHE;C;4"
);

so your script becomes:

my @array = (
    "AUT;E;1",
    "AUT;E;2",
    "AUT;E;2",
    "CHE;A;1",
    "CHE;C;4"
);
my %hash;
my %dups;
foreach (@array) {
    next if exists $dups{$_};  # skip this line if already stored
    $dups{$_} = 1;
    my @tmp = split/;/;
    push @{$hash{$tmp[0]}{$tmp[1]}}, $tmp[2];
}
say Dumper\%hash;

output:

$VAR1 = {
          'CHE' => {
                     'A' => [
                              '1'
                            ],
                     'C' => [
                              '4'
                            ]
                   },
          'AUT' => {
                     'E' => [
                              '1',
                              '2'
                            ]
                   }
        };
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I didn't know about push for hashes. Thanks again. –  SS Hegde Oct 24 '12 at 12:08
    
@SSHegde: You're welcome. –  M42 Oct 24 '12 at 12:14
2  
@SSHegde, note that push is working on an array. @{...} is making each element of the hash reference an array. –  dan1111 Oct 24 '12 at 12:30
    
@dan1111: Of course, you're right. –  M42 Oct 24 '12 at 12:37
    
Sorry.. :) Forgot to accept the answer. One more doubt, how can I add the 1s or 2s if they are not a duplicate ? –  SS Hegde Nov 9 '12 at 8:12

As noted, hash keys must be unique. One way arround this is to make each inner hash key point to an array of values for that key:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @Array = ( 
    "AUT;E;1",
    "AUT;E;2",
    "CHE;A;1",
    "CHE;C;4"
);
my %HashOfElem;

foreach(@Array)
{
    my @TmpArray = split(';',$_);
    print "@TmpArray\n";

    push @{$HashOfElem{$TmpArray[0]}{$TmpArray[1]}}, $TmpArray[2];
}

#show variable.
use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper %HashOfElem;
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the answer. :) –  SS Hegde Oct 24 '12 at 12:09
    
I'm glad to help...even if I was a few minutes too slow in this case :) –  dan1111 Oct 24 '12 at 12:42

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