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Is there a way to make a method to always return the type of the same class that called it ?

Let me explain:

class Shape {
  var mName: String = null
  def named(name: String): Shape = {
    mName = name
    this
  }
}

class Rectangle extends Shape {
  override def named(name: String): Rectangle = {
    super.named(name)
    this
  }
}

This works, but is there a way to do this without having to override the named function in all of my subclasses? I'm looking for something like this (which does not work):

class Shape {
  var mName: String = null
  def named(name: String): classOf[this] = { // Does not work but would be great
    mName = name
    this
  }
}

class Rectangle extends Shape {
}

Any idea ? Or is it not possible ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You need to use this.type instead of classOf[this].

class Shape {
  var mName: String = null
  def named(name: String): this.type = {
    mName = name
    this
  }
}

class Rectangle extends Shape {
}

Now to demonstrate that it works (in Scala 2.8)

scala> new Rectangle().named("foo")
res0: Rectangle = Rectangle@33f979cb

scala> res0.mName
res1: String = foo

this.type is a compile-type type name, while classOf is an operator that gets called at runtime to obtain a java.lang.Class object. You can't use classOf[this] ever, because the parameter needs to be a type name. Your two options when trying to obtain a java.lang.Class object are to call classOf[TypeName] or this.getClass().

share|improve this answer
    
It's worth mentioning that the singleton type can't be used for instances that are not this. –  pedrofurla Oct 24 '12 at 14:39
    
@pderofurla: It would seem like it should be possible with path-dependent types, but I know very little about path-dependent types in Scala, and I'm not even sure whether they're still experimental. –  Ken Bloom Oct 24 '12 at 14:45
    
I don't think it's related to path-dependent types at all. And no, path-dependent types are not experimental. –  pedrofurla Oct 25 '12 at 4:57

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