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I built a simple TCP server and a simple TCP client in Node.js

Now, when the client sends "exit" to the server, the connection is successfully closed. The server deletes the socket from its sockets list and sends "Bye bye!" to the client.

The connection on the client is closed as well but the app is still waiting for other inputs, so it doesn't die and I'm forced to type CTRL+C.

I tried adding process.exit() after connection closes but it doesn't work:

CLIENT CODE:

var net = require('net'),
    config = require(__dirname + '/config.json'),
    connection = net.createConnection(config.port, config.host);

connection.setEncoding('utf8');

connection.on('connect', function () {
    console.log('Connected');
});

connection.on('error', function (err) {
    console.error(err);
});

connection.on('data', function (data) {
    console.log('» ' + data);
});

connection.on('close', function() {
    console.log('Connection closed');
});

process.stdin.on('data', function (data) {

    if ((new String(data)).toLowerCase() === 'exit') {
        connection.end();
        process.exit();
    }
    else {
        connection.write(data);
    }

});

process.stdin.resume();

SERVER CODE:

var server = require('net').createServer(),
    config = require(__dirname + '/config.json'),
    sockets = [];

server.on('connection', function (socket) {
    socket.setEncoding('UTF-8');

    socket.on('data', function (data) {

        console.log('Received data: ' + data);

        if (data.trim().toLowerCase() === 'exit') {
            socket.write("Bye bye!\n");
            socket.end();
        }
        else {
            sockets.forEach(function (client) {
                if (client && client != socket) {
                    client.write(data);
                }
            });
        }

    });

    socket.on('close', function () {
        console.log('Connection closed');
        sockets.splice(sockets.indexOf(socket), 1);

        console.info('Sockets connected: ' + sockets.length);
    });

    sockets.push(socket);
});

server.on('listening', function () {
    console.log('Server listening');
});

server.on('close', function () {
    console.log('Server is now closed');
});

server.on('error', function (err) {
    console.log('error:', err);
});

server.listen(config.port);

EDIT:

I added a client connection "on close" event handler. So, the string "Connection closed" is now printed by the server and by the client too.

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4 Answers

I doubt that if ((new String(data)).toLowerCase() === 'exit') is succeeding because data most likely has a trailing newline (in your server, you trim() before doing the comparison, but not in the client).

If that's fixed, you've got a logic problem: when getting "exit" you close the connection without sending "exit" to the server, so the server code that looks for "exit" will never execute.

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(new String(data)).toLowerCase() works perfectly, because the connection will closed successfully, infact the server send "Bye bye!" to the client and print "Connection closed\nSockets connected: 0"... so the client is disconnected, server is in listening for future connections but the client process (not connection) is still active –  Francesco Casula Oct 25 '12 at 7:17
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Some time ago when improving the tests suite for node-cubrid module, I had encountered the same problem. After all tests have passed, nodeunit process didn't quit because node-cubrid was using connection.end() to close the client socket when timeout occurs, just like you did.

Then I replaced connection.end() with connection.destroy(), a cleaner way to ensure the socket is really closed without actually terminating the running process, which, I think, is a better solution than the above suggested process.exit(). So, in your client code context, I would do:

process.stdin.on('data', function (data) {
    if ((new String(data)).toLowerCase() === 'exit') {
       connection.destroy();
    }
    else {
       connection.write(data);
    }
});

According to Node.js documentation:

socket.destroy()

Ensures that no more I/O activity happens on this socket. Only necessary in case of errors (parse error or so).

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I tried with connection.destroy() method, but in my application the result is the same. It closes the connection such as connection.end() does. The point is that after connection closes the process is still running, and only the process.exit() called after connection.end() or connection.destroy() gives me the desired behavior. Please, read my answer. You have to put the process.exit() only in the connection.on('close') event handler, so after the connection was closed (or destroyed). Try my code on command line. –  Francesco Casula Jul 16 '13 at 8:38
    
close event isn't fired immediately when you call end(). It's called when the socket gets actually closed, eg. after end() the server says bye (which is +1 packet from the server), or right after destroy() which forces disconnection. Once the socket is closed, i.e. in close event handler, there is no point to process.exit() as that's the last thing the process will do anyway in your example. –  Eye Jul 17 '13 at 5:20
    
no man, you have to call the process.exit() instruction, or the client doesn't die and you have to press the CTRL+C shortcut to be able to type on your shell. this is the QUESTION, and only the process.exit() instruction fix this behavior on the code that I posted for. If you've found another way that fix this specific behavior on my application please post this. the connection.destroy() didn't fix my hanging behavior. I've just tried. –  Francesco Casula Jul 17 '13 at 9:45
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have to put the process.exit() instruction only on the last event handler. So, in this case you have to put it inside the client connection "on close" event handler:

CLIENT:

connection.on('close', function() {
    console.log('Connection closed');
    process.exit();
});
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Try with Event: 'close' in the server http://nodejs.org/api/net.html#net_event_close

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this is a meaningless answer... the server must be online to accept future connections –  Francesco Casula Oct 25 '12 at 7:29
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