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I have a combobox in my wpf app where I need to add 256 items inside from 0 to 255. This looks simple but I am concerned about the codelength.

XAML:

<ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding ChannelBitLengthList}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedChannelBitLengthList, Mode=TwoWay}" SelectedIndex="0" />

ViewModel:

public ObservableCollection<string> ChannelBitLengthList
    {
        get { return _ChannelBitLengthList; }
        set
        {
            _ChannelBitLengthList = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("ChannelBitLengthList");
        }
    }

    private string _SelectedChannelBitLengthList;
    public string SelectedChannelBitLengthList
    {
        get { return _SelectedChannelBitLengthList; }
        set
        {
            _SelectedChannelBitLengthList = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("SelectedChannelBitLengthList");
        }
    }

Constructor:

//List of Channels
_ChannelBitLengthList.Add("0");
_ChannelBitLengthList.Add("1");
_ChannelBitLengthList.Add("2");
_ChannelBitLengthList.Add("3");
.......... till .Add("255");                    

I dont want to have so many .Add() statements in order to enter the items. Is there an alternative and more efficient way where I can add all these 255 items without much code length?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

One problem with this approach is that the observable collection will notify the UI each time you update it.. thus it will unnecessarily re-render the interface each time. If you want to stop this from happen (similar to the old Suspend&ResumeLayout methods in winforms) you can do this:

using (Dispatcher.DisableProcessing())
{
  for(int i=0;i<=255;i++)
    _ChannelBitLengthList.Add(i.ToString());
}

Disable processing will stop the UI updates. When the DispatcherProcessingDisabled is disposed at the end of the Using scope it will re-enable the UI layout processing again.

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Since you want to insert up to 255 items (not 254), you'd use:

for(int i=0;i<=255;i++)
{
  _ChannelBitLengthList.Add(i.ToString());
}

Or if you want to use LINQ:

ChannelBitLengthList = new ObservableCollection<string>(Enumerable.Range(0, 256).Select(str=>str.ToString()));
share|improve this answer
    
Code length: check. Code efficiency: totally not check. –  Baboon Oct 24 '12 at 12:37
    
@Baboon What'd you want to change in terms of efficiency? –  SeToY Oct 24 '12 at 12:39
    
You'd probably have to subclass ObservableCollection and implement something similar to List.AddRange, raising CollectionChanged only once every item has been added. –  Baboon Oct 24 '12 at 12:49
    
@Baboon But that would be a fail at code length ;-) –  SeToY Oct 24 '12 at 13:35
    
Indeed, however it would be reusable. –  Baboon Oct 24 '12 at 13:44

you can write for loop like this if the items are 1...255

for(int i=0;i<=255;i++)
  _ChannelBitLengthList.Add(i.ToString());
share|improve this answer

Is this not working -

for (int i =0 ;i <256;i++)
{
   _ChannelBitLengthList.Add(i.ToString());
}

How about this -

ObservableCollection<string> ChannelBitLengthList =
       new ObservableCollection<string>(Enumerable.Range(0, 256)
               .Select(t => t.ToString()));
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How about:

ChannelBitLengthList = new ObservableCollection<string>(Enumerable.Range(0, 256).Select(x=>x.ToString()));
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