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I'd like to change the implementation depending on a constructor argument. Below is an example showing what I mean:

class Device(object):
    def __init__(self, simulate):
        self.simulate = simulate

    def foo(self):
        if simulate:
            self._simulate_foo()
        else:
            self._do_foo()

    def _do_foo(self):
        # do foo

    def _simulate_foo(self):
        # simulate foo

Now every call to foo() invokes an if clause. To avoid that I could bind the correct method dynamically to foo.

class Device(object):
    def __init__(self, simulate):
        if simulate:
            self.foo = self._simulate_foo
        else:
            self.foo = self._do_foo()

    def _do_foo(self):
        # do foo

    def _simulate_foo(self):
        # simulate foo

Are there any drawbacks why this should not be done or other drawbacks I'm not aware? Is this really faster?(I'm aware that inheritance is another option)

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How often is foo getting called? Unless you've profiled and found the overhead of the if is a real problem, this looks like a case of premature optimization. –  Wooble Oct 24 '12 at 12:37
1  
"Is this really faster?" Well, you've probably spent more time working on optimizing it than you'd ever save in practice. :^) Don't guess, though: use timeit and find out. –  DSM Oct 24 '12 at 12:38

2 Answers 2

I'd like to suggest the Replace Conditional with Polymorphism refactoring instead, as it solves your problem in a more elegant way than both the current code and the suggested alternative:

class Device(object):
    def foo(self):
        # do foo

class SimulatedDevice(object):
    def foo(self):
        # simulate foo
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What you are doing is perfectly fine, and you'll find the technique used in plenty of Python frameworks. However, you may want to use timeit to check if this is really faster.

When you access instance.foo, Python will first look for it in the class definition to make sure it's not a data descriptor (such as a property), then look it up in the instance namespace, but this is a very fast lookup since foo is not defined in the class (setting self.foo stores it in the instance __dict__ namespace).

The if statement is almost certainly slower than that double lookup, since the if statement itself needs to look up self.simulate in the same manner, but the difference will be negligible.

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