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Hope somebody can help me :)

I'm trying to scale a point from a map (Latitude, Longitude) to an image (x, y). For that i need to find the scale factor between the 2 NON-SIMILAR rectangles (i think).

I'll clarify, let's say:

Rectangle 1: A(40.0, 50.0) B(40.0, 56.0) C(43.0, 56.0) D(43.0, 50.0)

(Latitude Delta = 3, Longitude Delta = 6).

Rectangle 2: E(0, 0) F(500, 0) G(500, 300) H(0, 300)

(X Delta = 500, Y Delta = 300).

How can i scale a point P(41.5, 52.5) from rectangle 1 to point (x, y) on rectangle 2?

UPDATE:

General idea:

I'm trying to display the user current location (Lat, Lon) on a custom image (not a map image, a drawing of my own) therefor i can't use maps (MKMapKit, Google, Tom-Tom).

I have the user current location (via CoreLocation) and an image (800x460).

The area that i'm mapping is small so i don't need to worry about the earth's curve.

I'm trying to find a formula that'll help me scale my user (Lat, Lon) location into my image (on my iPhone screen)

Thanks!!!

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Well, you need to find the scale from rect1 to rect2 and then multiply your point with that scale. Since the rectangles are not similar , I think you will have to find the largest rectangle similar with rect1 that will fit in rect2. Hope this helps. Cheers! –  George Oct 24 '12 at 13:03
    
Thanks George! Still, I know such a formula exists, I just can't find/remember it. –  GTP_Tech Oct 24 '12 at 13:18
    
See my answer to get the formula. –  George Oct 24 '12 at 13:32
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well , getting the rectangle that is similar with the first one but fits in the second one is not hard. Here's how:

CGRect rect1, rect2; //your rectangles.
float scale = MIN(rect1.size.width / rect2.size.width , rect1.size.height / rect2.size.height);
CGRect resultedRect;
resultedRect.origin = rect2.origin;
resultedRect.size = CGSizeMake(rect2.size.width * scale, rect2.size.height * scale); 
//resultedRect is similar with rect1 but fits in rect2. You can now multiply your point with "scale" and get the new position.

I'm not sure this is what you are trying to achieve.

Regards,

George

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Hey George! Thanks for the code! I've tried it. Unfortunately as i suspected, my image gets deformed and the scaled point is off :( I'm trying to display the user current location (Lat, Lon) on a custom image (not a map image, a drawing of my own) therefor can't use maps (MKMapKit, Google, Tom-Tom). I've have the user current location (via CoreLocation) and an image (800x460). the area that i'm mapping is small so i don't need to worry about the earth's curve. For days now i'm trying to find a formula that'll help me scale my user (Lat, Lon) location into my image (on my iPhone screen). –  GTP_Tech Oct 24 '12 at 14:42
    
Ooooh , ok , then you should get the map coordinates of the image area's corners in the first place. Then it will be simple to get the location inside that rectangle. Sorry , I didn't understand the goal at first –  George Oct 24 '12 at 15:09
    
Cool :) BTW, i have the map coordinates (4 corners) of the area (Lat, Lon) in decimal values (not degrees). I'm just having truble "translating" (or displaying) a random (Lat, Lon) point (x, y) to (or in) my image. Any thoughts? Thanks! –  GTP_Tech Oct 24 '12 at 15:36
    
I think the same idea as the one in my answer applies. rect1 should be the rectangle of coordinates (lat , lon of your image and also the appropriate width & height meaning the width in lat points and height in lon points ) and rect2 should so something like CGRectMake(0,0,yourImageWidth , yourImageHeight). Also , the point should mean the location of the user in rect1. So do something like point.x -= rect1.origin.x; and point.y -= rect1.origin.y; first , and then do the things I wrote in the answer. I think there was just a problem of good initial values. –  George Oct 24 '12 at 15:52
    
Got it, I'll try :) Thank you very much!!! –  GTP_Tech Oct 24 '12 at 20:06
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If you're happy with the distortions it introduces you can just treat x(latitude) and y(longitude) coordinates separately.

If you think you're not going to be happy with such distortions, what do you propose to do about the incommensurate scales in latitude and longitude ? 1°lat != 1°long in the latitudes in your question.

If you need help scaling from a line of one length to a line of another, update your question.

EDIT following comment by OP.

OK, so you want to map an interval of 3° in latitude to an interval of 300 pixels (I guess) in Y, and an interval of 6° in longitude to an interval of 500 pixels in X.

I'm still not entirely sure if you are concerned about introducing further distortions; if you're not it's very easy. I'll suppose that the bottom left of your screen area is pixel (1,1) and that that is where you want to map (40°,56°) to. For every minute of longitude east of that point, move (500/360) pixels to the right. For every minute of latitude north of the corner, move (300/180) pixels up.

This rough-and-ready projection will not preserve the appearance of 2D shapes (for example a square will project to a rectangle) but there are many map projections in widespread use which do not preserve shapes.

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Thanks for your answer! I've updated my question as you requested :) Am i thinking right? Is this the right way? –  GTP_Tech Oct 24 '12 at 14:55
    
oh...sorry but i meant Latitude and Longitude in decimal values and not degrees. I am very concerned about distortions, can't allow any. For some reason i thought it's a matter of a single formula...guess i was wrong :) Thanks for your time! –  GTP_Tech Oct 24 '12 at 20:57
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