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how can i map a list of integers in Hibernate?? tanx!

like this:

@Entity 
class A{
 List<Integer> p;
 @OneToMany
 getP(...){..};
 setP(...){..};
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use @ElementCollection mapping. See documentation

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You can use element collection instead of creating separate entity, this will have true composition. refer to doc

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Create a new entity that contains the integer as a field value, then map to a List of that entity rather than Integer.

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That's just too much overhead for such simple thing. @ElementCollection will do the job –  Adam Dyga Oct 24 '12 at 14:00
    
The overhead on this is overwhelmingly in doing a join in the database, which isn't overly different from using ElementCollection. Sure, ElementCollection has advantages like being slightly less verbose, but I think it's unfair to down-vote every viable answer just because there's a potentially better answer available. –  Thor84no Oct 24 '12 at 14:49
    
Sorry, but your advice is basically not good. You start polluting the DB just because you can't map your object model properly. Maybe adding a column here or there is acceptable in small or personal projects, but in big enterprise-level DBs every new column has to be justified well and can't be added by any developer just like that. The same applies to Java side. Your implementation issues affect public class interface. Normally you would never, if you didn't have JPA, create a list of some weird objects List<MyIntRef> just to store Integers . –  Adam Dyga Oct 25 '12 at 7:21
    
@AdamDyga Well I've never used it or needed to as usually when I have a list of something it's more than just an integer, but reading the documentation that Piotr linked to it reads as though ElementCollection does do a join to a separate table (it talks of the CollectionTable annotation which tells it which table to join to and it clearly states that it will use a default value for if it's not present). If that's the case, the overhead here is the same as it is in creating a new entity and map that. If that isn't the case, can you point it out in the documentation? –  Thor84no Oct 25 '12 at 9:56

You will have to invent a new table that stores those IDs and link that table as a regular @OneToMany relation.

@Entity 
class A{
 List<MyRefTable> p;
 @OneToMany
 getP(...){..};
 setP(...){..};
}

@Entity MyRefTable {
  long myRefTableId;
  int p;
}

Just like any other table that has a OneToMany relation to the A Entity. There is no "list" construct in databases.

Sebastian

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That's just too much overhead for such simple thing. @ElementCollection will do the job –  Adam Dyga Oct 24 '12 at 13:59

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