Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

First of all I appreciate there is no one size fits all in terms of project layout, however as I am moving over to mvc, I want to try and start with solid foundations.

Currently I am really struggling so far with asp.net mvc project structure and n-tier and dependency injection (ninject). I have been reading Pro Asp.net Mvc 3 Framwork which separates the sport store over two projects, which is a nice start however I would like greater separation.

So far I think I my project should look something like the outline below

  • Web UI (Asp.Net Mvc)

  • Service layer

    • Service Interfaces (abstract)
    • Service (concrete implementation of Service Interfaces)
  • Data Layer

    • Data Interfaces (abstract)
    • Data (concrete implementation of Service Interfaces)

So where do my entities/Model sit? I believe I should move them out of the Web UI but I am not entirely sure where they fit.

Would a separate entities for each layer and use something like automapper to map between Data entities and service entities like Microsoft’s project silk originally did (This seems like quite an overhead to achieve the desired separation)? Or would an entities layer that the other layers would reference. This layer would contain either strongly typed datasets or Plain Old C Objects possibly under the title of infrastructure, which could then be passed between layers and customised within the Web Ui layer via view Models.

Also if am using Ninject then I should its configuration within the Composition Root (Web Ui project in this case).

This would mean adding a reference to all of the projects which kind of defeats the separation that I am trying to active.

Your help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So where do my entities/Model sit?

Give them their own project.

Would a separate entities for each layer and use something like automapper to map between Data entities and service entities like Microsoft’s project silk originally did

Try to prevent doing to much mapping. Having to map to a view model is quite natural, but instead of copying all properties of your entity into the view model, just expose the entity as a property on your view model and add UI specific properties. If all the UI needs is that entity:don't use a view model. This extra mapping will only cause an extra burdon on the maintainability of your application.

Also try to prevent having to map from a DA to your entities. Instead use POCO entities as Entity Framework, LINQ to SQL and NHibernate support. Again, this extra mapping will probably not worth the effort.

The mapping I use in my application is often on another level. I design my business logic around commands and queries and this even translates very well to the presentation layer. You can use MVC's binding feature to display a command directly on the view, bind the form properties back to the command and execute it. With a little bit of extra work MVC would even allow you to have it completely compile-time supported (even within the view).

share|improve this answer
    
Ok so I end up with something like - Web UI (Asp.Net Mvc) - Web UI - Service layer * Service Interfaces (abstract) * Service (concrete implementation of Service Interfaces) - Data Layer * Data Interfaces (abstract) * Data (concrete implementation of Service Interfaces) - –  Stig Oct 24 '12 at 15:18
    
Ok so I end up with something like - Web UI (Asp.Net Mvc) - Web UI - Service layer * Service Interfaces (abstract) * Service (concrete implementation of Service Interfaces) - Data Layer * Data Interfaces (abstract) * Data (concrete implementation of Service Interfaces) - POCO Entites which are referenced in all three layers. - Then how would I use Ninject within the Composition Root without adding references to all the other projects? –  Stig Oct 24 '12 at 15:24
1  
You business model (aka domain model), which contains the POCO entities, should be the center of your application/solution. So everything can have references to your domain model. In my book that is not only possible and ok, but also preferable. –  Maarten Oct 25 '12 at 9:33

logical layers != physical layers. the simpler the structure and fewer projects the easier it will be to manage.

with that I typically have 1 web project and use namespaces as my logical layers. typically I like to have viewmodels for UI display and domain models to manage how the entities behave.

share|improve this answer
    
I second that splitting into projects isn't necessary. It provides you no advantages UNLESS you plan to use the data layer in another application. But since this is an ASP.NET MVC application, this should not apply. Sharing data will probably be done with WebAPIs if needed. –  Pluc Oct 24 '12 at 14:04
    
I take your point that logical layers != physical layers. However I do want to provide loose coupling. –  Stig Oct 24 '12 at 14:46
    
@Stig: Take a look at this article: Is Layering Worth the Mapping?. It gives you more information than we can write here. –  Steven Oct 24 '12 at 15:31
    
loose coupling is logical, not physical. you also need to decide what requires loose coupling and what does not. take a look at the WebAPI framework. there are not too many interfaces and yet objects are loosely coupled and it's simple to test with an in-memory web server. –  Jason Meckley Oct 24 '12 at 15:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.