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While investigating some fundamentals of multiple regression, I decided to try and compare my manual efforts to those of the "effects" package, by John Fox. I've generated variables with some relationships, and want to get adjusted means for a factor when controlling for the influence of a continuous variable.

I have become stalled, however, as the effect function in the effects package returns an error "invalid type (builtin) for variable 'c'"

When I check the type of variable 'c' using typeof(c), I'm told it is of type double, as I constructed it to be.

  • What could be the cause of this error?
  • Is the variable 'c' being coerced for some reason to type 'builtin'?

Here is my code:

set.seed(1986)
y <- rnorm(100)
f <- sapply(y, function(x) if(x < 0) 1 else 2)
f.f <- as.factor(f)
set.seed(1987)
c <- rnorm(100, 0, .1) + y + f

an3 <- lm(y ~ f.f + c); summary(an3)

ef <- effect("f.f", an3)
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migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Oct 24 '12 at 13:54

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As an aside, please avoid the use of c as a variable name. It's an extremely commonly-used built-in function in R. –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 24 '12 at 12:18
    
@AriB.Friedman That was my first thought, but I tried the code with "q" substituted for "c" and the same thing happened. Still, that is good advice. –  Peter Flom Oct 24 '12 at 12:20
    
@PeterFlom q is also a builtin function :-) –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 24 '12 at 12:23
    
Slap self on forehead! So, my instinct was right, but I just chose the wrong substitution. –  Peter Flom Oct 24 '12 at 12:26
    
@PeterFlom I've done it myself many a time! q's easy to forget since it doesn't really get used as a function, and since it's a more 'mathy' variable like x,y,i,j,p,m,n.... –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 24 '12 at 12:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

c is not a good choice for a a variable name. It's an extremely commonly-used built-in function in R.

Changing c to d works for me:

set.seed(1986)
y <- rnorm(100)
f <- sapply(y, function(x) if(x < 0) 1 else 2)
f.f <- as.factor(f)
set.seed(1987)
d <- rnorm(100, 0, .1) + y + f

an3 <- lm(y ~ f.f + d); summary(an3)

library(effects)
ef <- effect("f.f", an3)
 ef

 f.f effect
f.f
         1          2 
 0.5504214 -0.3231941 
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Another option is to store the data in a data.frame; this has other benefits as well, especially if one is working with multiple data sets.

set.seed(1986)
d <- data.frame(y=rnorm(100))
d <- within(d, {
  f <- sapply(y, function(x) if(x < 0) 1 else 2)
  f.f <- as.factor(f)
  set.seed(1987)
  c <- rnorm(100, 0, .1) + y + f
})

library(effects)

an3 <- lm(y ~ f.f + c, data=d); summary(an3)
ef <- effect("f.f", an3)
ef

# f.f effect
# f.f
#          1          2 
#  0.5504214 -0.3231941 
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