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I am using cv::EM algorithm to do gaussian mixture model classification for image streams. However, while classifying pixels into different models using EM::prediction method, I found it is too much slow, uses about 3 seconds for one 600x800 image. On the other hand, the MOG background subtractor that is provided by OpenCV is performing this part very quickly, uses only about 30ms. So I decided to use its perform method to replace EM::prediction part. However, I don't know how to change it.

The code that I am using up to the prediction part is as follows:

cv::Mat floatSource;
source.convertTo ( floatSource, CV_32F );
cv::Mat samples ( source.rows * source.cols, 3, CV_32FC1 );

int idx = 0; 

for ( int y = 0; y < source.rows; y ++ )
{
    cv::Vec3f* row = floatSource.ptr <cv::Vec3f> (y);
    for ( int x = 0; x < source.cols; x ++ )
    {
        samples.at<cv::Vec3f> ( idx++, 0 ) = row[x];
    }
}

cv::EMParams params(2);  // num of mixture we use is 2 here
cv::ExpectationMaximization em ( samples, cv::Mat(), params );
cv::Mat means = em.getMeans();
cv::Mat weight = em.getWeights();

const int fgId = weights.at<float>(0) > weights.at<flaot>(1) ? 0:1;
idx = 0; 

for ( int y = 0; y < source.rows; y ++ )
{
    for ( int x = 0; x < source.cols; x ++ )
    {
        const int result = cvRound ( em.predict ( samples.row ( idx++ ), NULL );
    }
}

The partial code I found from "cvbgfg_gaussmix.cpp" for EM prediction is like this:

static void process8uC3 ( BackgroundSubtractorMOG& obj, const Mat& image, Mat& fgmask, double learningRate )
{
    int x, y, k, k1, rows = image.rows, cols = image.cols;
    float alpha = (float)learningRate, T = (float)obj.backgroundRatio, vT = (float)obj.varThreshold;
    int K = obj.nmixtures;

    const float w0 = (float)CV_BGFG_MOG_WEIGHT_INIT;
    const float sk0 = (float)(CV_BGFG_MOG_WEIGHT_INIT/CV_BGFG_MOG_SIGMA_INIT);
    const float var0 = (float) (CV_BGFG_MOG_SIGMA_INIT*CV_BGFG_MOG_SIGMA_INIT);

    for ( y = 0; y < rows; y ++ )
    {
        const uchar* src = image.ptr<uchar>(y);
        uchar* dst = fgmask.ptr<uchar>(y);
        MixData<Vec3f>* mptr = (MixData<Vec3f>*)obj.bgmodel.ptr(y);

        for ( x = 0; x < cols; x++, mptr += K )
        {

            float wsum = 0, dw = 0; 
            Vec3f pix ( src [x*3], src[x*3+1], src[x*3+2]);
            for ( k = 0; k < K; k ++ )
            {
                float w = mptr[k].weight;
                Vec3f mu = mptr[k].mean[0];
                Vec3f var = mptr[k].var[0];
                Vec3f diff = pix - mu; 
                float d2 = diff.dot(diff);

                if ( d2 < vT * (var[0] +var[1] + var[2] )
                {
                    dw = alpha * ( 1.f - w );
                    mptr[k].weight = w + dw;
                    mptr[k].mean = mu + alpha * diff;
                    var = Vec3f ( max ( var[0] + alpha * ( diff[0] * diff[1] - var[0] ), FLT_EPSILON),
                        max ( var[1] + alpha * ( diff[1]*diff[1] - var[1] ), FLT_EPSILON,
                        max ( var[2] + alpha * ( diff[2]*diff[2] - var[2] ), FLT_EPSILON ));

                    mptr[k].var = var;
                    mptr[k].sortKey = w/sqrt ( var[0] + var[1] + var[2] );

                    for ( k1 = k-1; k1 >= 0; k1-- )
                    {
                        if ( mptr[k1].sortKey > mptr[k1+1].sortKey)
                            break;
                        std::swap ( mptr[k1],mptr[k1+1]);
                    }
                    break;
                }

                wsum += w;
            }


            dst[x] = (uchar) (-(wsum >= T ));
            wsum += dw;

            if ( k == K )
            {
                wsum += w0 - mptr[K-1].weight;
                mptr[k-1].weight = w0;
                mptr[K-1].mean = pix;
                mptr[K-1].var = Vec3f ( var0, var0, var0 );
                mptr[K-1].sortKey = sk0;
            }
            else
                for ( ; k < K; k ++ )
                    wsum += mptr[k].weight;

            dw = 1.f/wsum;

            for ( k = 0; k < K; k ++ )
            {
                mptr[k].weight *= dw;
                mptr[k].sortKey *= dw;
            }
    }
}
}

How can I change this partial code so that it can be used in my first code to em.predict part? Thank you in advance.

Update

I did it by myself like this for using the process8uC3 function in my code:

cv::Mat fgImg ( 600, 800, CV_8UC3 );
cv::Mat bgImg ( 600, 800, CV_8UC3 );

double learningRate = 0.001;
int x, y, k, k1;
int rows = sourceMat.rows;  //source opencv matrix
int cols = sourceMat.cols;  //source opencv matrix
float alpha = (float) learningRate;
float T = 2.0;
float vT = 0.30;
int K = 3;

const float w0 = (float) CV_BGFG_MOG_WEIGTH_INIT;
const float sk0 = (float) (CV_BGFG_MOG_WEIGHT_INIT/CV_BGFG_MOG_SIGMA_INIT);
const float var0 = (float) (CV_BGFG_MOG_SIGMA_INIT*CV_BGFG_MOG_SIGMA_INIT);
const float minVar = FLT_EPSILON;

for ( y = 0; y < rows; y ++ )
{
    const char* src = source.ptr < uchar > ( y );
    uchar* dst = fgImg.ptr < uchar > ( y );
    uchar* tmp = bgImg.ptr ( y ); 
    MixData<cv::Vec3f>* mptr = (MixData<cv::Vec3f>*)tmp;

    for ( x = 0; x < cols; x ++, mptr += K )
    {
         float w = mptr[k].weight;
         cv::Vec3f mu = mpptr[k].mean[0];
         cv::Vec3f var = mptr[k].var[0];
         cv::Vec3f diff = pix - mu;
         float d2 = diff.dot ( diff );

         if ( d2 < vT * ( var[0] + var[1] + var[2] ) )
         {
             dw = alpha * ( 1.f - w );
             mptr[k].weight = w + dw;
             mptr[k].mean = mu + alpha * diff;
             var = cv::Vec3f ( max ( var[0] + alpha*(diff[0]*diff[0]-var[0]),minVar),
                     max ( var[1]+ alpha*(diff[1]*diff[1]-var[1]),minVar),
                     max ( var[2] + alpha*(diff[2]*diff[2]-var[2]),minVar) );

             mptr[k].var = var;
             mptr[k].sortKey = w/sqrt ( var[0] + var[1] + var[2] );

             for ( k1 = k-1; k1 >= 0; k1 -- )
             {
                 if ( mptr[k1].sortKey > mptr[k1+1].sortKey )
                     break;
                     std::swap ( mptr[k1], mptr[k1+1] );
             }
             break;
         }
         wsum += w;
     }
     dst[x] = (uchar) (-(wsum >= T ));
     wsum += dw;

     if ( k == K )
     {
          wsum += w0 - mptr[k-1].weight;
          mptr[k-1].weight = w0;
          mptr[k-1].mean = pix; 
          mptr[k-1].var = cv::Vec3f ( var0, var0, var0 );
          mptr[k-1].sortKey = sk0;
      }
      else 
          for ( ; k < K; k ++ )
          {
              mptr[k].weight *= dw;
              mptr[k].sortKey *= dw;
          }
      }
  }
}

It compiled without error, but the result is totally a mass. I doubt maybe it is something related to the values T and vT, and changed them with several other values, but it didn't make any difference. So I believe even it compiled without error, I used it in a wrong way.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not direct answer to your questions but a few comments on your code:

int idx = 0; 

for ( int y = 0; y < source.rows; y ++ )
{
    cv::Vec3f* row = floatSource.ptr <cv::Vec3f> (y);
    for ( int x = 0; x < source.cols; x ++ )
    {
        samples.at<cv::Vec3f> ( idx++, 0 ) = row[x];
    }
}

My guess is that here you want to create a matrix with rows-by-cols rows and 3 columns, storing the pixels RGB (or any other color space you might be using) values. First, your samples matrix is wrongly initialised, since you forget a loop on the image channels. Only the first channel is filled in your code. But anyway, you can do just the same by calling reshape:

cv::Mat samples = floatSource.reshape(1, source.rows*source.cols)

This will not only fix your bug, but also speed up your process as accessing to pixels using Mat.at<> is really not that fast, and reshape is O(1) operation, as the underlying matrix data is not changed, just the number of rows/cols/channels.

Second, you can save some time by passing the full sample matrix to em::predict instead of each sample. At the moment, you make rows-by-col calls to em::predict while you can do just one, plus rows-by-cols call to mat.row() which creates a temporary matrix(header).

One way to speed this further would be to parallelize the calls to predict, e.g. using TBB which is used by OpenCV (have you turned TBB ON when compiling OpenCV? Maybe predict is already multithreaded, not checked that).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer. I did it as you said, by using reshape, and then used the full matrix instead of each sample. But the result is not making big difference. –  E_learner Oct 26 '12 at 13:08
    
Did you compile OpenCV with optimisation ? Now best thing to do without having to rewrite everything is to parellelize –  remi Oct 26 '12 at 14:05
    
thank you for your suggestion. I'm wondering why background subtraction provided by opencv is working so fast? I think there must be a way to do this very fast like that, which is why I asked this question. Except parellelize, I think if I can change this "process8uC3" function into my own code then it could be achieved. Don't you think so? –  E_learner Oct 26 '12 at 14:19
    
I dont know, it seems kind of strange to have such a difference between the two. One reason could be the number of mixture you use that would be smaller in background substraction. But in your code you use only 2, is that correct? Maybe there is something else hidden that consume a lot of processing time. Did you try profiling your code? –  remi Oct 28 '12 at 21:16
    
Yes, my mixture number is 2 for my case. And I've tried profiling my code with "VerySleepy", and I got these statistics: RtlUserthreadstart (time spent: 60.0% exclusive, 80.0% inclusive) SleepEx (20.0% exclusive, 20.0% inclusive) WaitForSingleObjectEx (20.0% exclusive, 20.0% inclusive) BaseThreadInitThunk (0.0% exclusive, 20.0%inclusive) QMutexLocker::QMutexLocker (timpe spent: 0.0% exclusive, 20.0% inclusive) ObjectStublessClient24 (0.0% exclusive, 20.0% inclusive) QMutex::lockInternal (0.0%exclusive, 20.0%inclusive) QBasicAtomicInt::fetchAndAddOrdered(0.0%exclusive,20.0%inclusive) –  E_learner Oct 30 '12 at 7:55

Take a look into source code of GrabCut in OpenCV: modules/imgproc/src/grabcut.cpp. There are private class GMM (implements training Gaussian Mixture Model and sample classification) in this module. To initialize GMM the k-means is used. If you need even more faster initialization you could try k-means++ algorithm (refer to generateCentersPP function in modules/core/src/matrix.cpp module).

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your answer. I've looked into the "Grabcut.cpp" before, especially the GMM class you've mentioned, but it couldn't help me, or maybe I did it wrong. Besides, I also tried the Kmeans algorithm, but seems like it couldn't handle the colors in a shadow region as good as EM algorithm. –  E_learner Oct 31 '12 at 11:44
    
Yes, using of k-means for initialization is not good if mixtures are not separable :( –  Vlad Oct 31 '12 at 11:50
    
Perhaps you should try some another library, for example Darwin: drwn.anu.edu.au/classdrwnGaussianMixture.html It not so popular as OpenCV but has number of good implementation of computer vision and machine learning algorithms. –  Vlad Oct 31 '12 at 11:53
    
thank you very much for your suggestion :) I will take a look at it, but also I have to handle this in OpenCV :( –  E_learner Oct 31 '12 at 12:03

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