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I am struggeling with a summation problem which fails with under or overflow.

I have over 8271571 double values from which I need the arithmetical mean.

But the main problem is, that I don't seem to be smart enough to do this.

Currently I am just sum them up and divide by the size. This fails for most of the time in an under or overflow, giving me -1.#INF or 1.#INF.

for(size_t j = 0; j < 12; j++)
{
    double a = 0.0;

    for(size_t i=0; i < Features->size(); i++)
    {
        a += Features->at(i)->at(j);
    }
    meanVector[j] = a / Features->size();
}

There is however no possibilty to say its just positive or negative value, so I can not set the data type to be signed.

I also tried to use a division-constant in the summation or dividing by the size already when I add them up, but that doesn't help either.

Values may range, from what I have seen on a quick look, from -20 to +30, but can't say that for sure.

So maybe anyone can give me a hint on how to do the math or use a workaround. This must be able but I just lack ideas.

Edit:

The size is never 0, a checkup is done in front of the division. Further on none of the values is invalid in any way. While extracting them I already do a check for #IND and NaN.

If I divide already on the summation, I guess this is also no correct result?

a+= Features->at(i)->at(j) / Features->size()

results in -3.7964983860343639e+305

but for every iteration. This can't be right and looks like a boundary

Edit 2:

So some of you guys were totally right. There is lots of garbage sh*t going on..

0: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 3362.12 1: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 142181 2: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 59537.8 3: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 236815 4: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 353488 5: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 139960 6: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 7: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 8: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 9: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 10: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 11: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0

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2  
You can sum number[i]/n - but it might increase the numeric error... –  amit Oct 24 '12 at 14:24
1  
Are you sure, if all Features->size() are not 0? (hint: any floating point number, divided by 0 will give you infinity - if the number is non-negative - 1.#INF, if it's negative - -1.#INF) –  Kiril Kirov Oct 24 '12 at 14:28
    
@PaulR it was a typo, sorry. –  Stefan Oct 24 '12 at 14:29
    
It's also possible that one of the values being summed is +/-INF - you should add an assert to check for this. –  Paul R Oct 24 '12 at 14:29
    
I edited some information for what you asked. –  Stefan Oct 24 '12 at 14:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  • I have over 8271571 double values from which I need the arithmetical mean.
  • Values may range, from what I have seen on a quick look, from -20 to +30, but can't say that for sure.
  • The size is never 0, a checkup is done in front of the division.

This doesn't add up. The sum should fit in double easily. There must be something wrong with the data. You can make a quick inspection of your values like this:

for (size_t j = 0; j < 12; ++j)
{
    std::vector<double> values;

    values.reserve(Features->size());
    for (size_t i = 0; i < Features->size(); ++i)
    {
        values.push_back(Features->at(i)->at(j));
    }

    // Find extreme values, including infinity
    std::cout << j << ": " 
              << "size: " << values.size() 
              << ", min: " << *std::min_element(values.begin(), values.end())
              << ", max: " << *std::max_element(values.begin(), values.end())
              << std::endl;

    // Find NaNs
    for (size_t i = 0; i < Features->size(); ++i)
    {
        // Choose one of the following ifs

        // For C++11 (isnan is a standard thing now)
        if (std::isnan(Features->at(i)->at(j))

        // Or for Visual Studio
        if (_isnan(Features->at(i)->at(j))

        // Or for GCC prior to C++11
        if (__builtin_isnan(Features->at(i)->at(j))

        {
            std::cout << "NaN at [" << i << ", " << j << "]" << std::endl;
        }
    }
}

You should be able to quickly spot if there's anything odd with the input.

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1  
+1. This doesn't add up - both literally and figuratively. There's something funky with some of the data. I suspect some of the values haven't been initialized. These numbers presumably represent something physical. Whether it's meters, kilograms, #people, whatever, 10^300 of them is a garbage value. –  David Hammen Oct 24 '12 at 14:55
    
+1 you both are totally right! 0: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 3362.12 1: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 142181 2: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 59537.8 3: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 236815 4: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 353488 5: size: 8327571, min: -2.24712e+307, max: 139960 6: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 7: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 8: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 9: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 10: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 11: size: 8327571, min: 0, max: 0 What a bunch of garbage sh*t and shame on me! –  Stefan Oct 24 '12 at 15:00
    
Hi, I have now "solved" getting garbage data. There was a little bug when reading the data.. Anyhow I found a strange behaviour. Checking the elements with your loops works fine and gives me nice and smooth data. No errors or garbage values. But if I sum them up later, I find a value that is in the vector -1.#IND .. but while pushing it in the loop to values it is not. Accessing it directly with the known index I can see again #IND.. crazy ? –  Stefan Oct 26 '12 at 6:57
    
@Stefan, you have NaNs in your data. It cannot be detected by min/max_element. I edited the code to specifically look for those. If you don't know what NaN is you can read about it here (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NaN). Basically it's not-a-number, like the result of sqrt(-1). –  detunized Oct 26 '12 at 8:03
1  
@Stefan, value != value doesn't always work. I compilers think then can optimized that. isnan is your friend. min_element cannot detected them because they are neither < nor > than any other element. In some specially crafted situations you can have it returned by min_element, but not in general case. –  detunized Oct 26 '12 at 8:18

You can calculate the mean using an online algorithm, which means you don't have to add all values before dividing. Here:

template< typename NumberType >
class ProgressiveMean{
    NumberType  m_Mean;
    NumberType  m_MeanKMinus1;
    long        m_K;
public:
    ProgressiveMean();
    void Seed( NumberType seed );
    void AddValue( NumberType newVal );
    NumberType getMean() const;
};

template< typename NumberType >
ProgressiveMean<NumberType>::ProgressiveMean():
    m_Mean( 0 ),
    m_MeanKMinus1( 0 ),
    m_K( 0 ){
}

template< typename NumberType >
void ProgressiveMean<NumberType>::Seed( NumberType seed ){
    m_MeanKMinus1 = seed
    m_K = 2;  //Start from K = 1, so next one is 2
}

template< typename NumberType >
void ProgressiveMean<NumberType>::AddValue( NumberType newVal ){
    m_Mean = m_MeanKMinus1 + (newVal - m_MeanKMinus1) / m_K;
    m_MeanKMinus1 = m_Mean;
    m_K++;
}

template< typename NumberType >
NumberType ProgressiveMean<NumberType>::getMean() const{
    return m_Mean;
}

To use this, call Seed with the initial value, loop calling AddValue for the rest, and when you're done, call getMean.

This idea is from Knuth, and I got it from here.

You can also consider using a big number library.

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