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I need to add 14 minutes and 59 seconds to an unknown time in an array. How do I do this? This is what I have so far:

Date duration = df.parse("0000-00-00 00:14:59");

arrayOpportunity[2] = arrayOpportunity[2] + duration;

The time is not being changed. Thanks!

I have done my research. I cant paste the entire code I have. But mainly I didnt want to make you read it all. Just looking for a simple answer of how to add two timestamps.

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What type is the object in arrayOpportunity[2]? –  Niklas Oct 24 '12 at 14:32
    
It's a string. Is that the problem? –  Samuel Knox Oct 24 '12 at 14:46
    
Sorry for delayed reply...first time using this site. –  Samuel Knox Oct 24 '12 at 14:46
    
It probably is. You have to convert the string to an appropriate type, like Date and then add the time on that object. –  Niklas Oct 24 '12 at 14:48

5 Answers 5

If you are talking about a java.sql.Timestamp, it has a method called setTime. java.util.Date has a setTime method as well for that sort of thing.

You could something like this:

static final Long duration = ((14 * 60) + 59) * 1000;

oldTimestamp.setTime(oldTimestamp.getTime() + duration);
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getTime() is coming up in red. not sure why. SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat(); df.applyPattern("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"); [0]); arraySuspects.add(arrayGPS[0]); // } // long timediff = coord2.getTimestamp().getTimeInMillis() - // coord1.getTimestamp().getTimeInMilis(); Date duration = df.parse("0000-00-00 00:14:59"); // SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy/mm/dd"); Date convertedDate = df.parse(arrayOpportunity[2]); System.out.println(arrayOpportunity[2]); arrayOpportunity[2].setTime(arrayOpportunity[2].getTime() + duration); –  Samuel Knox Oct 24 '12 at 14:59

Just add the appropriate number of milliseconds using #getTime() and #setTime():

timeStamp.setTime(timeStamp.getTime() + (((14 * 60) + 59)* 1000));
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Just be careful, this doesn't factor DST and even the leap seconds we just had. –  roxan Jul 2 at 14:36

If you want to add time in millis then you can just add

  (((14 * 60) + 59) * 1000) <-- Mili second value of 14 m and 59 sec
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Thanks! I am much closer now. This is where I am at: System.out.println(arrayOpportunity[2]); arrayOpportunity[2] += (((14 * 60) + 59) * 1000); System.out.println(arrayOpportunity[2]); OUTPUT: 2012-11-15 04:00:00 2012-11-15 04:00:00899000 any suggestions? –  Samuel Knox Oct 24 '12 at 14:39
    
@SamuelKnox what is the type of arrayOpportunity –  Amit Deshpande Oct 24 '12 at 14:42

arrayOpportunity[2] = arrayOpportunity[2] + 14*60*1000 + 59*1000;

The Date object you have may work, but it doesn't really represent 14 minutes and 59 seconds, it just represents a particular time in calendar (eg. 14 minutes 59 after the epoch start which is 1st January 1970 00:14:59).

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If you just want to add times, I suggest using Joda Time.

The class LocalTime lets you add durations like this:

LocalTime timeSum = time.plusMinutes(14).plusSeconds(59);
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