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I often find myself needing to wrap a function on an object for various purposes. Is there an elegant way to preserve the length property of the original function on the wrapper function?

For example:

var x = {
    a: function(arg1, arg2) { /* do something */ }
};

function wrap(obj) {
    var original = obj.a;
    obj.a = function wrapper() {
        console.log('a called');
        original.apply(this, arguments);
    };
}

x.a.length; // => 2
wrap(x);
x.a.length; // => 0

What I would like to do:

var x = {
    a: function(arg1, arg2) { /* do something */ }
};

function wrap(obj) {
    var original = obj.a;
    obj.a = function wrapper() {
        console.log('a called');
        original.apply(this, arguments);
    };
    obj.a.length = original.length;
}

x.a.length; // => 2
wrap(x);
x.a.length; // => 2 (actual still 0)

However, this doesn't work because length isn't writable.

The only solutions I can come up with at the moment are to (1) dynamically generate the function as a string and eval/new Function it or (2) have a giant array of proxy functions of different lengths and select the proxy function corresponding to the correct length. This doesn't seem like an elegant solution to me, and it seems a reasonable request to be able to create a function with arbitrary length without specifying each argument in the function.

It seems like bind is able to do this internally:

function a(b, c) { }
a.bind(null).length; // => 2

This creates a wrapper function with the length of the original! That's exactly what I want to be able to do myself.

Is there any other way?

share|improve this question
    
Does it have to be length? Could you copy that to another property - maybe even add a function to the Function prototype to get either length or your copied variable so the function will return length of wrapped and unwrapped functions? –  sje397 Oct 24 '12 at 15:03
    
just wondering, but what actual use is the .length property of a function? –  Alnitak Oct 24 '12 at 16:13
    
Yes, it has to be length. @Alnitak, I've never used it, but as a framework developer I want to create a general wrapper which mimics the original function, including the length property. It's part of the ES spec, and I want my framework to support it, regardless of whether I have a use for it. Someone else may. –  Nathan Wall Oct 24 '12 at 17:48
    
@NathanWall given that the MDN version of the shim for .bind() can't reproduce the .length property I think it's unlikely you'll be able to achieve what you want other than through nasty eval style hacks :( –  Alnitak Oct 24 '12 at 21:39
    
Yeah, I saw that. Oh well, eval hack it is. I think this should be supported. –  Nathan Wall Oct 24 '12 at 23:44
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I like the eval(...) approach because it's simple.

function wrap(obj) {
    var f = obj.fun.toString();
    f = f.replace("{", "{ alert('wrapper'); ");
    obj.fun = eval('['+f+']')[0];
}

You could extend this to have 2nd parameter of wrap that represents the wrapper function and get even fancier with the string operations to combine them.

If you're goal is transparency with your wrapping then just make use of the dynamic functionality of the programming language.


If you're willing to do extra processing on your JavaScript files you could have your hot patching/wrapping built in.

var x = {
    a: function(arg1, arg2) {
        (x._a || (function(){}))();
        ... do actual function stuff ...
    }
}
function wrap(obj) {
    obj._a = function() {
        console.log("ok");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. You may be right. eval may not really be such a bad option here. Thanks for helping me think through it. I'm going to leave the question open for a while to see if anyone comes up with anything else, but so far this is the only real answer. Thanks –  Nathan Wall Oct 24 '12 at 19:17
    
@Nathan Wall - Implementing a version of the "Wrap" function for say 0-9 parameters isn't so bad either, Microsoft uses a very similar approach for it's generic Tuple class in the .Net framework. –  LastCoder Oct 24 '12 at 19:27
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If you need to get the length of wrapped and unwrapped functions in the same way but can handle not using the length property, something like this might help:

Function.prototype.mylengthf = function() {
    return this.mylength | this.length;
};

var x = {
    a: function(arg1, arg2) { /* do something */ },
    b: function(arg1, arg2, arg3) { /* do something else */ }
};

function wrap(obj) {
    var original = obj.a;
    obj.a = function wrapper() {
        console.log('a called');
        original.apply(this, arguments);
    };
    obj.a.mylength = original.length;
}

log(x.a.length); // => 2
wrap(x);
log(x.a.length); // => 0
log(x.a.mylengthf()); // => 2
log(x.b.mylengthf()); // => 3
​
share|improve this answer
    
This won't fit my use. I write frameworks, low level abstractions, shims, and patches, and I need my code to be able to be dropped into anyone's project, without teaching them to use mylength instead of length or forcing them to refactor existing code. –  Nathan Wall Oct 24 '12 at 19:19
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