Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for a nice-cocoa way to serialize a NSData object into an hexadecimal string. The idea is to serialize the deviceToken used for notification before sending it to my server.

I have the following implementation, but I am thinking there must be some shorter and nicer way to do it.

+ (NSString*) serializeDeviceToken:(NSData*) deviceToken
{
    NSMutableString *str = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:64];
    int length = [deviceToken length];
    char *bytes = malloc(sizeof(char) * length);

    [deviceToken getBytes:bytes length:length];

    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
    	[str appendFormat:@"%02.2hhX", bytes[i]];
    }
    free(bytes);

    return str;
}

Thanks for your inputs.

thomas

share|improve this question
add comment

10 Answers

up vote 104 down vote accepted

This is a category applied to NSData that I wrote. It returns a hexadecimal NSString representing the NSData, where the data can be any length. Returns an empty string if NSData is empty.

NSData+Conversion.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface NSData (NSData_Conversion)

#pragma mark - String Conversion
- (NSString *)hexadecimalString;

@end

NSData+Conversion.m

#import "NSData+Conversion.h"

@implementation NSData (NSData_Conversion)

#pragma mark - String Conversion
- (NSString *)hexadecimalString {
    /* Returns hexadecimal string of NSData. Empty string if data is empty.   */

    const unsigned char *dataBuffer = (const unsigned char *)[self bytes];

    if (!dataBuffer)
        return [NSString string];

    NSUInteger          dataLength  = [self length];
    NSMutableString     *hexString  = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:(dataLength * 2)];

    for (int i = 0; i < dataLength; ++i)
        [hexString appendString:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02lx", (unsigned long)dataBuffer[i]]];

    return [NSString stringWithString:hexString];
}

@end

Usage:

NSData *someData = ...;
NSString *someDataHexadecimalString = [someData hexadecimalString];

This is "probably" better than calling [someData description] and then stripping the spaces, <'s, and >'s. Stripping characters just feels too "hacky". Plus you never know if Apple will change the formatting of NSData's -description in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
Definitely cleaner and more generic than what we had before. Thanks! –  sarfata Feb 16 '12 at 9:56
1  
Why does this not have more up-votes?!? This is an amazingly clean way of performing this task. +1. –  Jason Whitehorn Feb 24 '12 at 15:49
4  
Nice, but two suggestions: (1) I think appendFormat is more efficient for large data since it avoids creating an intermediate NSString and (2) %x represents an unsigned int rather than unsigned long, although the difference is harmless. –  svachalek May 9 '12 at 23:28
3  
I had to remove the (unsigned long) cast and use @"%02hhx" as the format string to make this work. –  Anton Sep 25 '12 at 0:13
1  
Right, per developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/cocoa/conceptual/… the format should be "%02lx" with that cast, or cast to (unsigned int), or drop the cast and use @"%02hhx" :) –  qix Sep 5 '13 at 7:17
show 4 more comments

What about:

const unsigned *tokenBytes = [deviceToken bytes];
NSString *hexToken = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%08x%08x%08x%08x%08x%08x%08x%08x",
						ntohl(tokenBytes[0]), ntohl(tokenBytes[1]), ntohl(tokenBytes[2]),
						ntohl(tokenBytes[3]), ntohl(tokenBytes[4]), ntohl(tokenBytes[5]),
						ntohl(tokenBytes[6]), ntohl(tokenBytes[7])];
share|improve this answer
    
This is by far the best solution so far. Thanks a lot. –  sarfata Sep 9 '09 at 10:38
11  
Unfortunately this does not allow an NSData to be of any length. –  badcat Nov 13 '10 at 8:27
    
True, this will only work with a fixed-length device token. –  ianolito Nov 26 '10 at 19:48
    
why don't simple apped string with new stringsWithFormat if you need varialbe lenth support –  dig Apr 10 '12 at 22:04
add comment

Using the description property of NSData should not be considered an acceptable mechanism for HEX encoding the string. That property is for description only and can change at any time. As a note, pre-iOS, the NSData description property didn't even return it's data in hex form.

Sorry for harping on the solution but it's important to take the energy to serialize it without piggy-backing off an API that is meant for something else other than data serialization.

@implementation NSData (Hex)
- (NSString*)hexString {
    NSUInteger length = self.length;
    unichar* hexChars = (unichar*)malloc(sizeof(unichar) * (length*2));
    unsigned char* bytes = (unsigned char*)self.bytes;
    for (NSUInteger i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        unichar c = bytes[i] / 16;
        if (c < 10) c += '0';
        else c += 'A' - 10;
        hexChars[i*2] = c;
        c = bytes[i] % 16;
        if (c < 10) c += '0';
        else c += 'A' - 10;
        hexChars[i*2+1] = c;
    }
    NSString* retVal = [[NSString alloc] initWithCharactersNoCopy:hexChars
                                                           length:length*2 
                                                     freeWhenDone:YES];
    return [retVal autorelease];
}
@end
share|improve this answer
1  
Someone downvoted this answer with no explanation. Would whoever downvoted this answer please explain why? –  NSProgrammer Nov 7 '12 at 21:58
    
+1 you answered first and most simply while still answering the question. Don't know why anyone would down vote. –  Brenden Oct 22 '13 at 20:28
    
Thanks @Brenden! –  NSProgrammer Oct 22 '13 at 23:42
add comment

I needed an answer that would work for variable length strings, so here's what I did:

+ (NSString *)stringWithHexFromData:(NSData *)data
{
    NSString *result = [[data description] stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString:@" " withString:@""];
    result = [result substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(1, [result length] - 2)];
    return result;
}

Works great as an extension for the NSString class.

share|improve this answer
1  
what if Apple changes the way they represent description? –  Brenden Oct 22 '13 at 20:26
1  
I'd imagine it would stop working :) –  BadPirate Oct 23 '13 at 0:00
add comment

You can always use [yourString uppercaseString] to capitalize letters in data description

share|improve this answer
add comment

[deviceToken description]

you'll need to remove the spaces.

Personally I base64 encode the deviceToken, but it's a matter of taste.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not get the same result. description returns : <2cf56d5d 2fab0a47 ... 7738ce77 7e791759> While I am looking for: 2CF56D5D2FAB0A47....7738CE777E791759 –  sarfata Aug 20 '09 at 19:02
add comment

A better way to serialize/deserialize NSData into NSString is to use the Google Toolbox for Mac Base64 encoder/decoder. Just drag into your App Project the files GTMBase64.m, GTMBase64.h e GTMDefines.h from the package Foundation and the do something like

/**
 * Serialize NSData to Base64 encoded NSString
 */
-(void) serialize:(NSData*)data {

    self.encodedData = [GTMBase64 stringByEncodingData:data];

}

/**
 * Deserialize Base64 NSString to NSData
 */
-(NSData*) deserialize {

    return [GTMBase64 decodeString:self.encodedData];

}
share|improve this answer
    
Looking at the source code it seems that the class providing that is now GTMStringEncoding. I have not tried it but it looks like a great new solution to this question. –  sarfata Jun 10 '11 at 17:49
add comment
@implementation NSData (Extn)

- (NSString *)description
{
    NSMutableString *str = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
    const char *bytes = self.bytes;
    for (int i = 0; i < [self length]; i++) {
        [str appendFormat:@"%02hhX ", bytes[i]];
    }
    return [str autorelease];
}

@end

Now you can call NSLog(@"hex value: %@", data)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Change %08x to %08X to get capital characters.

share|improve this answer
2  
this would be better as a comment since you didn't include any context. Just sayin' –  Brenden Oct 22 '13 at 20:25
add comment

I needed to solve this problem and found the answers here very useful, but I worry about performance. Most of these answers involve copying the data in bulk out of NSData so I wrote the following to do the conversion with low overhead:

@interface NSData (HexString)
@end

@implementation NSData (HexString)

- (NSString *)hexString {
    NSMutableString *string = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity:self.length * 3];
    [self enumerateByteRangesUsingBlock:^(const void *bytes, NSRange byteRange, BOOL *stop){
        for (NSUInteger offset = 0; offset < byteRange.length; ++offset) {
            uint8_t byte = ((const uint8_t *)bytes)[byteRange.location + offset];
            if (string.length == 0)
                [string appendFormat:@"%02X", byte];
            else
                [string appendFormat:@" %02X", byte];
        }
    }];
    return string;
}

This pre-allocates space in the string for the entire result and avoids ever copying the NSData contents out by using enumerateByteRangesUsingBlock. Changing the X to an x in the format string will use lowercase hex digits. If you don't want a separator between the bytes you can reduce the statement

if (string.length == 0)
    [string appendFormat:@"%02X", byte];
else
    [string appendFormat:@" %02X", byte];

down to just

[string appendFormat:@"%02X", byte];
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.