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Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate on Windows 7.

EDIT: This is very old code I didn't write, part of a big old mess, deeply rooted in the code base. It ain't goona change any time soon. Though, I'm glad you're all confirming what I thought: that this should be impossible, on its own.

I have the equivelant code:

typedef std::vector<Widget*> widget_vector_t;

typedef struct
{
    widget_vector_t widget_array_[SOME_SIZE_CONSTANT];
} WIDGET_STRUCT;

Then, in a class, I have a WIDGET_STRUCT member:

WIDGET_STRUCT widgets_;

In the body of some member method, I see this... this... THING:

Widget *p = widgets_.widget_array_[SOME_INDEX_CONSTANT];

To be clear, it is my understanding that this is assigning a vector of Widget pointers to a Widget pointer.

And it works.

Does the STL vector provide some cast operator or something that returns the first element in the vector?

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closed as not a real question by Lol4t0, Andrey, Mark B, interjay, Cyrille Oct 24 '12 at 18:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
I'm doubtful that this will compile. Can you put together a small compilable sample of this? –  sharth Oct 24 '12 at 15:42
    
No warnings when compiling? –  gogoprog Oct 24 '12 at 15:43
2  
Here's an example of how to produce a minimal example to demonstrate the code you describe: ideone.com/rvE2w9. As you can see, it doesn't compile (on that compiler). If my code isn't the same as your real code, then there's something in your real code that you neglected to mention in your description, and that might be relevant. So do likewise, show complete code. –  Steve Jessop Oct 24 '12 at 15:44
1  
It doesn't work. And you have a member variable that is an array of vectors of Widget pointers? Surely there's a less convoluted way of doing whatever it is that you're attempting. –  Praetorian Oct 24 '12 at 15:44
3  
It will compile if you have #define SOME_INDEX_CONSTANT 0][0. I don't think it will compile in normal circumstances. –  interjay Oct 24 '12 at 15:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I figured it out, and I'm embarassed.

The actual code has a huge pile of HORRIBLY named typedefs, camel cased and shortened, all in one place, and it's poorly formatted. Needless to say, it's a bitch to read and all the names are very nearly similar.

The type in the struct is actually an array of pointers, "Widget *" was typedefed with a very similar name to the vector of Widget pointers.

The code behaves perfectly normally, the existing code base is a steaming pile, and the problem ultimately lies between the chair and the keyboard.

Thanks for playing.

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My condolences. Though, I have to admit, I am interested in the typedef names. Mind sharing them? –  Xeo Oct 24 '12 at 18:32

That's a simple misunderstanding.

The definition of vector below:

vector<int*> a[10];

It is not mean define a (10-size, int*-type) vector, insteads, you get a (10-size, vector<int*>-type) array;

Does the STL vector provide some cast operator or something that returns the first element in the vector?

The related thing is array return the pointer of the element type:

int* b[10];

then

int** ptrb = b;

is legal.

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To answer your direct question:

Does the STL vector provide some cast operator or something that returns the first element in the vector?

No. This code can not compile:

#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Widget {};

typedef std::vector<Widget*> widget_vector_t;

static const size_t SOME_SIZE_CONSTANT = 10;
static const size_t SOME_INDEX_CONSTANT = 0;
typedef struct
{
    widget_vector_t widget_array_[SOME_SIZE_CONSTANT];
} WIDGET_STRUCT;

int main()
{
    WIDGET_STRUCT widgets_;
    Widget *p = widgets_.widget_array_[SOME_INDEX_CONSTANT];
}

The compiler complains that you are attempting to convert between a vector<Widget*> and a Widget*, and there is no such conversion available.

To answer your less direct question:

What am I seeing?

Something else must be happening here that you haven't shown us. I have one theory, but it's just a theory.

In the real code, instead of widget_array_ being a typedef vector<Widget*>, perhaps it is actually a subclass of vector for which a conversion operator has been provided. For instance:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Widget {};

class widget_vector_t : public std::vector<Widget*>
{
public:
    operator Widget* () 
    {
        return front();
    }
};

static const size_t SOME_SIZE_CONSTANT = 10;
static const size_t SOME_INDEX_CONSTANT = 0;
typedef struct
{
    widget_vector_t widget_array_[SOME_SIZE_CONSTANT];
} WIDGET_STRUCT;

int main()
{
    WIDGET_STRUCT widgets_;
    Widget *p = widgets_.widget_array_[SOME_INDEX_CONSTANT];
}

This will compile -- it's even legal and, from what I can tell, legitimate code. It is also horrid, terrible code, but I think you already know that.

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