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I've simulated a static class variable in Javascript.

MyObject.staticVariable = "hello world";

function MyObject() {
    // do something
}

MyObject.prototype.someFunction = function() ...

I do not understand why this syntax works because I do not create MyObject explicitly (and how could I and still have a MyObject function?) before I assign the staticVariable property. But it does work, and I've seen it in many answers to the question along the lines of: how do I simulate a static class variable in Javascript?

How can I achieve this functionality when I declare the MyObject function in a namespace?

var Namespace = {};

// Not allowed, and for good reason in my eyes, as NameSpace.MyObject does not exist
Namespace.MyObject.staticVariable = "hello world";

Namespace.MyObject = function() {
    // do something
}

Namespace.MyObject.prototype.someFunction = function() ...

Let me know if I can clarify and/or if my thinking is off. Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Function declarations are "hoisted" to the top of the current lexical environment.

This means that the function exists before any other code in that environment runs.

// This works

MyObject.staticVariable = "hello world";

function MyObject() {
    // do something
}

// This does not

MyObject.staticVariable = "hello world";

var MyObject = function() {
    // do something
}

In your Namespace example, it's effectively the same as the second example. This means that you'll needs to make sure the function assignment happens first.

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Function declarations are hoisted, that is, you can use them above their instantiation. However, function expressions are not. In your example, you do this:

Namespace.MyObject.staticVariable = "hello world";

Namespace.MyObject = function() {
    // do something
}

This won't work because Namespace.MyObject was not (and cannot be) created as a function declaration. As for simulating the functionality, use a function:

function add( prop, val ) {
    Namespace.MyObject[ prop ] = val;
}

This will allow you to add properties to the object before you explicitly create them:

add( "staticVariable", "Hello World" );

Namespace.MyObject = function() {
    // do something
};
share|improve this answer

Could you clarify what you mean by static class variable? JavaScript is not the same as Java.

If you want a constant that no client can modify, you can use closures. For example:

var Namespace = {};
Namespace.MyObject = (function(){
  var staticVariable = "hello world";

  //this will be assigned to "MyObject"
  return {
    someFunction: function() {
       //refer to staticVariable here
       //no client can modify staticVariable directly; 
       //only through the methods you provide
    }
  };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This provides more information than I need, but I think that it is useful information. I don't really have any reference language in particular in mind, and I meant to replace class with object. I'm not yet worried about protecting my objects internals, and it's a little beyond me why anyone would bother with doing so in JavaScript, but we'll see how my thinking evolves. –  user1771594 Oct 24 '12 at 16:09

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