Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I currently have the following code

while (!visibleTiles.isEmpty())) {
    tile = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next();
    if (tile != null){
        bitmap = visibleTiles.remove(tile);
        if(bitmap != null && !containsKey(tile)){ //safe to recycle if tile cache is not actively holding it
            bitmap.recycle();
        }
    }
}

However, I get a NoSuchElementException crash on the line

tile = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next();

Is there a big difference in using the isEmpty() method and calling a hasNext() call? I know that hashmaps do not have a hasNext() call so I did the following:

while (visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().hasNext()) {
    tile = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next();
    if (tile != null){
        bitmap = visibleTiles.remove(tile);
        if(bitmap != null && !containsKey(tile)){ //safe to recycle if tile cache is not actively holding it
            bitmap.recycle();
        }
    }
}

Obviously, I know that I should just run the app and see if it crashes, but the issue is that it's difficult to reproduce the problem.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Your condition is visibleTiles.isEmpty(), so i guess there are no entries. But you try to get the next element of the iterator w/o checking if there is one, and obviously there is none. That's why the NSE is thrown. –  jlordo Oct 24 '12 at 16:13
2  
also, you remove the tile, so I think you want your condition to be !visibleTiles.isEmpty() but i'm not sure if you'll run into a ConcurrentModificationException doing it like that –  jlordo Oct 24 '12 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

visibleTiles.isEmpty()

just checks whether map is empty (or) it has any elements.

ile = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next();

retrieves next element from iterator.

You need to do hasNext() check before doing next() on iterator.

hasNext() javadoc says

Returns true if the iteration has more elements. (In other words, returns true if next would return an element rather than throwing an exception.)

so, if no element is available and call next() on iterator will return NoSuchElementException.

On top of this, I think you really would like to do NOT empty check

while (!visibleTiles.isEmpty())) {
....
}
share|improve this answer
    
But if the visibleTiles is not empty, should you get the first key using visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next();? –  Yogendra Singh Oct 24 '12 at 16:16
    
@YogendraSingh: OP not checking for not empty, checking for empty, so for sure there won't be next() available. –  Nambari Oct 24 '12 at 16:17
    
@YogendraSingh yes, but is empty as you can see in the while condition –  jlordo Oct 24 '12 at 16:17
    
@YogendraSingh: Yes, but that still doesn't solve hasNext() issue if your looping the collection. If you are just getting one element, yes I agree with you that just !empty check may be enough. –  Nambari Oct 24 '12 at 16:19
    
@Nambari: When list is not empty, why should you check the hasNext if you are getting the iterator on the map within while loop? Please note, OP is getting iterator within the loop with the condition that map is still not empty(assuming condition is corrected). –  Yogendra Singh Oct 24 '12 at 16:20

while (visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().hasNext()) creates a new Iterator every time it is called*. If visibleTiles is not empty, this will always be true, as the next method of the respective iterator is never called and the internal pointer never advances.

Iterators should be used like this:

Iterator<TileType> tileIt = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator();
while (tileIt.hasNext()) {
    TileType tile = tileIt.next();
    // ...
}

*The point here is that there may be several iterators referring to the same collection at the same time. Each iterator has its own internal state storing (not necessarily explicitly) which element was returned last and which shall be returned next by the next()call. This can be useful, for example, do perform some operation on all pairs of elements from a collection, where two iterators are needed.

share|improve this answer
    
this is a good point. thanks for the heads up –  kevinl Oct 25 '12 at 17:34

Thanks to the good information on efficiency, I have fixed the no such element exception with the code from the original post by removing the isEmpty call. It looks like you generally want to use hasNext when you call next in the same area of code.

while (visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().hasNext()) {
    tile = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next();
        if (tile != null){
            bitmap = visibleTiles.remove(tile);
            if(bitmap != null && !containsKey(tile)){ //safe to recycle if tile cache is not actively holding it
                bitmap.recycle();
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
also, in this case, I actually do get the concurrent mod exception if I initialize the iterator as its own variable outside the scope. –  kevinl Oct 25 '12 at 17:45
    
Still, twice per iteration you create a new iterator and throw it away immediately afterwards. It does not seem you really understood the answers. –  arne.b Nov 9 '12 at 18:50
    
Also, what is this code supposed to do if visibleTiles contains null? It seems this code would run forever then. (This is also true for the code in the question, but more obvious here.) –  arne.b Nov 9 '12 at 18:52

Fixing while condition should resolve the issue.

Change the condition to check not empty by adding not(!) in front:

   while (!visibleTiles.isEmpty())) {

EDIT: Sample code:

    HashMap<String, Object> visibleTiles = new HashMap<String, Object>();
    visibleTiles.put("abc", new Object());
    visibleTiles.put("xyz", new Object());
    visibleTiles.put("def", new Object());
    String tile = null;
    while (!visibleTiles.isEmpty()) {
        tile = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next();
        if (tile != null){
            Object bitmap = visibleTiles.remove(tile);
            if(bitmap != null){ //safe to recycle if tile cache is not actively holding it
                System.out.println("Recycle");
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the insight, but that was already in place. I accidentally made a typo –  kevinl Oct 25 '12 at 17:35
    
@kevinl: Are you still getting the issue with the corrected condition? –  Yogendra Singh Oct 25 '12 at 18:05
    
If I use the condition !visibleTiles.isEmpty(), I receive the same NoSuchElement exception. Look below for the correct answer using the hasNext() method –  kevinl Oct 25 '12 at 20:09
    
@kevinl I added a sample code to validate the concept. I runs exactly 3 times and print "Recycle". This works to me without any issues as expected. There must be something different. –  Yogendra Singh Oct 25 '12 at 20:17
    
yes it's different when you have to recycle over 100 bitmaps. your example sample above contains 3 elements. As I said in the beginning, this exception is difficult to reproduce –  kevinl Oct 25 '12 at 21:17

This is not related to the question you are asking (which has been answered already) but just as a side note from the docs

Note that the fail-fast behavior of an iterator cannot be guaranteed as it is, generally speaking, impossible to make any hard guarantees in the presence of unsynchronized concurrent modification. Fail-fast iterators throw ConcurrentModificationException on a best-effort basis. Therefore, it would be wrong to write a program that depended on this exception for its correctness: the fail-fast behavior of iterators should be used only to detect bugs.

You can avoid that you can go remove on keyset iterator (which ultimately removes entry from the map), instead of doing the remove on the map itself (that's modifying the map externally while you are iterating through the keyset).

The part of your code that looks vulnerable:

tile = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next();
if (tile != null){
    bitmap = visibleTiles.remove(tile);

Example:

The following resulted in an ConcurrentModificationException:

Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();         
map.put("1", "1");
map.put("2", "1");
map.put("3", "1");
Iterator<String> it = map.keySet().iterator();
while(it.hasNext()) {
    if(it.next().equals("2")) {
         map.remove("2");
    }
}

while the following removes the entry from the map:

Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();         
map.put("1", "1");
map.put("2", "1");
map.put("3", "1");
Iterator<String> it = map.keySet().iterator();

while(it.hasNext()) {

    String key = it.next();

    if(key != null) {

         String value = map.get(key); // you have the value and
         it.remove(); //you are modifying the map only through the iterator itself

         //... do stuffs with the value
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is a good point. however I do not run into concurrent mod exceptions. Also, I need the .remove(object) method to keep the variable stored whereas the .remove() method does not return an object –  kevinl Oct 25 '12 at 17:35
    
@kevinl: As it says, it doesn't always but you cannot be so sure that it will never occur. Its better to avoid it when you can. you can call remove after calling next. Just assign the what next returns to some variabe. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 25 '12 at 17:53
    
the .remove(object) method does not return the same object as the .next()'s object. Hence, you can't assign the .remove() call to anything since it doesn't return an object either. –  kevinl Oct 25 '12 at 20:14
    
@kevinl: next() on keyset iterator returns the key, if you save it you can use it to get the value (which is what you want) from the map, and then invoke remove() on the keyset iterator. Which ultimately avoids the concurrent map modification. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 25 '12 at 21:06
    
I guess I'm not following, but are you suggesting the following? tile = visibleTiles.keySet().iterator().next(); if (tile != null){ visibleTiles.remove(); if so, how would I get the bitmap? –  kevinl Oct 25 '12 at 21:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.