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First let me state, clamd has been proven to respond correctly:

$ echo PING | nc -U /var/run/clamav/clamd.sock
PONG

the scanner was setup as follows:

#set up a Clamav scanner
use File::VirusScan;
use File::VirusScan::ResultSet;
my $scanner = File::VirusScan->new({
    engines => {
            '-Daemon::ClamAV::Clamd' => {
                    socket_name => '/var/run/clamav/clamd.sock',
            },
    },
});

and the whole script works fine on a Solaris 11 box. I'm running this on a Linux CentOS 5.3 (Final) I did have a problem installing File::VirusScan from CPAN, the latest version 0.102 won't compile and CPAN testers seems to confirm this as 435 fails out of 437. So I downloaded the prev 0.101 version from CPAN, the version I'm also running in Solaris and manually installed apparently ok

perl -v
This is perl, v5.8.8 built for x86_64-linux-thread-multi


sub scanner {
        $|++; # buffer disabled
        (my $path, my $logClean) = @_;



    my $recurse = 5;
    print color "yellow";
    print "[i] Building file scan queue - recurse deepth $recurse \n";
    print color "green";
    print "SCAN QUEUE:0";

    #Get list of files

    if( $rootPath){
     use File::Find::Rule;
    my $finder = File::Find::Rule->maxdepth($recurse)->file->relative->start("$$path");
        while( my $file = $finder->match()  ){
           $|++;
           #$file = substr($file,length($rootPath)); #remove path bloat
           push(@scanList,"/$file");
           print "\rSCAN QUEUE:" .scalar(@scanList);  #update screen
        }
    }else{
     push(@scanList,"$$path");
    }


    print "\rSCANING:0";
    #set up a Clamav scanner
    use File::VirusScan;
    use File::VirusScan::ResultSet;
    my $scanner = File::VirusScan->new({
        engines => {
                '-Daemon::ClamAV::Clamd' => {
                        socket_name => '/var/run/clamav/clamd.sock',
                },
        },
    });



    #scan each file
    my $scanning  = 0;
    my $complete = -1;

    foreach $scanFile (@scanList){
             $scanning++;
             ##################################################
             #scan this file
             $results = $scanner->scan($rootPath.$scanFile);
             ##################################################
                  #array of hashes
             my $centDone = int(($scanning/scalar(@scanList))*100);

             if($centDone > $complete){
                 $complete = $centDone;
             }
             if($centDone < 100){
                  #\r to clear/update line
                  $format = "%-9s %-60s %-15s %-5s";
                  printf $format, ("\rSCANING:", substr($scanFile,-50), "$scanning/".scalar(@scanList), "$centDone%");
             }else{
                  print "\rSCAN COMPLETE                                                                            ";
             }

             # array ref
             foreach $result (@$results) {
                        #array of pointers to hashes
                      #print 'data:'
                      #print 'state:'
                       if($$result{state} ne "clean"){
                           if($$result{data} =~ /^Clamd returned error: 2/){
                               $$result{data} = "File too big to scan";
                           }
                           push(@scanResults,[$scanFile,$$result{state},$$result{data}]); # results
                      }elsif($$logClean){
                           push(@scanResults,[$scanFile,$$result{state},$$result{data}]);
                      }
                      unless($$result{state} eq "clean"){
                                    print color "red";
                                    print "\r$scanFile,$$result{state},$$result{data}\n";
                                    print color "green";
                                    print "\rSCANING: $scanning/".scalar(@scanList)." : $centDone%";
                               if($$result{state} eq "virus"){
                                    push(@scanVirus,scalar(@scanResults)-1);  #scanResuts index of virus

                               }elsif($$result{state} eq "error"){
                                    push(@scanError,scalar(@scanResults)-1);  #scanResuts index of Error
                               }
                      }
             }

    } print "\n";

}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looking at the source code for the Clamd package the following script should approximate the call it is attempting and will hopefully give you a better idea of how it's failing. Try saving it to a separate file (like test.pl) and run it using "perl test.pl":

use IO::Socket::UNIX;
use IO::Select;

my $socket_name = '/var/run/clamav/clamd.sock';
my $sock = IO::Socket::UNIX->new(Peer => $socket_name);

if(!defined($sock)) {
    die("Couldn't create socket for path $socket_name");
}

my $s = IO::Select->new($sock);

if(!$s->can_write(5)) {
    $sock->close;
    die("Timeout waiting to write PING to clamd daemon at $socket_name");
}

if(!$sock->print("SESSION\nPING\n")) {
    $sock->close;
    die('Could not ping clamd');
}

if(!$sock->flush) {
    $sock->close;
    die('Could not flush clamd socket');
}

if(!$s->can_read($self->{5})) {
    $sock->close;
    die("Timeout reading from clamd daemon at $socket_name");
}

my $ping_response;
if(!$sock->sysread($ping_response, 256)) {
    $sock->close;
    die('Did not get ping response from clamd');
}

if(!defined $ping_response || $ping_response ne "PONG\n") {
    $sock->close;
    die("Unexpected response from clamd: $ping_response");
}
share|improve this answer
    
$ perl test.pl Unexpected response from clamd: UNKNOWN COMMAND I will see if I can work out why tomorrow, thanks for the link to source. –  dannix Oct 24 '12 at 19:46
1  
Ah there's your problem, it looks like recent versions of clamd have removed the SESSION command: linux.die.net/man/8/clamd (you should be able to verify this with a "man clamd") .. I bet that was fixed in the newer version of this module that wouldn't compile for you. It looks like your options at this point are to either get the newer version to work, get an older version of clamd installed that recognizes SESSION, or modify the Clamd.pm source code yourself. –  Toby J Oct 24 '12 at 20:12
    
Ah!! well spotted, you are correct [link]cpansearch.perl.org/src/DSKOLL/File-VirusScan-0.102/lib/File/… is the updated version, clearly has IDSESSION now. I dropped the new file in place and it appears to work just fine. –  dannix Oct 25 '12 at 7:32

It looks like the various antivirus engines need to be installed separately from the File::VirusScan base library. Does the following return an error?

perl -mFile::VirusScan::Engine::Daemon::ClamAV::Clamd -e ''

If it displays an error that it can't locate Clamd.pm, you need to install that engine module.

If it doesn't display an error, you'll need to post more details, such as the code you're actually using to perform the scan and/or the error output (if any).

share|improve this answer
    
No error, but CPAN does say it's shipped wit it "Virus scanners are supported via pluggable engines under the File::VirusScan::Engine namespace. At the time of this release, the following plugins are shipped with File::VirusScan: Clam Antivirus Scanning daemon via File::VirusScan::Engine::Daemon::ClamAV::Clamd" It shouldn't be the script, as it works fine on another box. The error is in the question title "Daemon::ClamAV::Clamd says did not get PING response from clamd" –  dannix Oct 24 '12 at 17:33
    
Can you post the line where you're actually calling the $scanner method that throws the error? Or does it happen just on the initialization code you've posted? –  Toby J Oct 24 '12 at 17:48
    
posted the offending section above, thanks. –  dannix Oct 24 '12 at 19:37

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