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I'm suppose to find if there is duplicates in a list and return true or false using recursion only (no loops). So if ArrayList of char is used, [a,b,c,d,e] should return false. [a,a,b,c,d] or [a,b,b,c,c,d] should return true. I've tried and tested different ways and it worked for some cases but not all. I changed my code around and this is what I have now. (Has problem at the last if statement) Can anyone give me some hints? Thanks.

    public static <T> boolean duplicate(List<T> list) throws NullPointerException {
        return duplicateHelper(list, list.get(0));
}

public static <T> boolean duplicateHelper(List<T> list, T t){
    if (list == null)
        throw new NullPointerException();
    if(list.isEmpty())
        return false;
    if(list.size() > 1){
        if(t.equals(list.get(1)))
            return true;        
    }
    if(list.size() == 1)
        return false;
    if(!duplicateHelper(list.subList(1,list.size()), t)){
        return  duplicate(list.subList(1,list.size()));
    }
    return false;

}
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Problem is if you want to find duplicate you need two elements one that you are passing one from the list so you need to add implementation that way –  Amit Deshpande Oct 24 '12 at 16:44
    
When you step through the code in you debugger what do you see goes wrong? –  Peter Lawrey Oct 24 '12 at 16:45
    
Why does it evaluate (and return the result of) duplicate(..) after duplicateHelper(..)? The initial/kickoff method should likely never be called again .. –  user166390 Oct 24 '12 at 16:53
    
@pst duplicateHelper looks for a specific elment t, duplicate looks for the next element in the list –  John B Oct 24 '12 at 17:01
    
can you go through and select an answer for your questions? @TKP –  Night Jan 23 at 14:35

2 Answers 2

I would recommend doing something like this:

function recurse(myList, seenList)  
{  
    currentElement =     myList.removeLastElement();
    if(seenList.contains(currentElement)    
     {
        return false;  
      }
    seenList.add(currentElement);   


    return recurse(myList,seenList);
}  

While I realize this is homework, I tried to make it as straight forward as possible without giving the complete solution.

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The problem with this solution is that you change the incoming list and create a new one. This means that you must make a copy of the input list to create one you can safely modify. If memory is not an issue, great. –  John B Oct 24 '12 at 16:54
    
@JohnB It being a homework problem, I am going to let OP figure out the joys of the Iterator object and/or the fun of learning recursive logic. –  Woot4Moo Oct 24 '12 at 16:55
    
in the above, removeLastElement needs to be replaced with remove(0) to use Java's List class –  John B Oct 24 '12 at 16:59
1  
@JohnB As I said before, this is clearly a homework problem, and it is not my job nor anyone's outside of OP's professor/ TA to give the full working program. Working through my second masters degree now I utilize my professors as often as possible, as being spoon fed doesn't help. –  Woot4Moo Oct 24 '12 at 17:01
    
OK, point taken, +1. However, I would suggest that removing the first element is in general more efficient than the last given that the input list could be a linked list. –  John B Oct 24 '12 at 17:04

Recursion is assisted by pre and post conditions. Things that are always true at start and finish. What I see is that when you first enter duplicateHelper, elements t is at position 0 of the passed list. However, when you recurse into duplicateHelper the sublist that is passed no longer contains t at index 0 but instead contains the element that was previously compared.

Consider passing a sublist from duplicate to duplicateHelper and moving the comparison check to a not empty else. Add logging statements to figure out where the code goes wrong.

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+1 for logging to solve problems –  Woot4Moo Oct 24 '12 at 16:58
    
Logging is not for debugging locally. Debuggers are. –  user166390 Oct 24 '12 at 17:14
    
I've tried passing in sublist to Helper but the problem is when the Helper returned, I don't get the original sublist so I can't look at the next element. Anyway, I got rid of the helper method and re-wrote the code just using the 'duplicate' and it seems to be working now. Thank you. –  TKP Oct 24 '12 at 19:38

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