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Consider providing static factory methods insteads of constructors

This maybe a controversial question and may not be suited for this forum (so I will not be insulted if you choose to close this question).

It seems given the current capabilities of Java there is no reason to make constructors public ... ever. Friendly, private, protected are OK but public no.

It seems that its almost always a better idea to provide a public static method for creating objects. Every Java Bean serialization technology (JAXB, Jackson, Spring etc...) can call a protected or private no-arg constructor.

My questions are:

  • I have never seen this practice decreed or written down anywhere? Maybe Bloch mentions it but I don't own is book.
  • Is there a use case other than perhaps not being super DRY that I missed?

EDIT: I explain why static methods are better.

.1. For one you get better type inference. For example See Guava's http://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/CollectionUtilitiesExplained

.2. As a designer of the class you can later change what is returned with a static method.

.3. Dealing with constructor inheritance is painful especially if you have to pre-calculate something. .4. More reasons here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/3852556/318174

I should have posted that this is for public API like code. I frequently violate all sorts of rules (like using direct field access) for Unit Testing, convenience, and cause I'm lazy. So when I meant ever, I meant your releasing it into the wild.

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marked as duplicate by Rohit Jain, Louis Wasserman, Baz, Matthew Farwell, EJP Oct 24 '12 at 21:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Maybe Bloch mentions it but I don't own is book. -> You always have internet, to read it online. And that is the best resource you can have to understand this aspect. –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 16:49
    
@RohitJain I have read snippets online in various articles and coworks have had the book. I had no idea its entirety is online. I'll have to google for it. –  Adam Gent Oct 24 '12 at 16:51
    
Just top mention, if you are considering static factory, then private constructors are ok. no public, no protected. You don't want to instantiate this class from outside right? Not even from subclasses. –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 16:51
    
@AdamGent.. See the post I have given. There I have provided with the link for the book, and also the pros and cons of it. –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 16:52
    
There is nothing wrong with creating an object using its public constructor. –  Steve Kuo Oct 24 '12 at 16:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If following is how the method looks

public class MyClass {

    private MyClass() { }

    public static MyClass getInstance() {
        return new MyClass();
    }
}

then would prefer to have a public no-arg constructor.

If I have to call some method like that, it will make me feel that it is doing something to construct the object but in reality it isn't.

I don't think there is any point in having a method that doesn't do anything but invoke the constructor itself.

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+1 Now thats a good reason. But the only issue is that you now have to make either the class final or worry about people subclassing (if thats your concern.) –  Adam Gent Oct 24 '12 at 16:59
    
@BheshGurung. There is also, various other points, that you can consider that can favour the use of static factories. –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 17:00
    
For e.g. a static factory can return an instance of any subtype of the class. You can have it in another class (which is preferable, to have factory in other class rather than inside a class), which will instantiate the class for you. –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 17:01
    
@RohitJain: I like having them, it's just an example where I would prefer not to have one. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 24 '12 at 17:03
    
@BheshGurung. Yeah then in that case, its perfectly fine. +1 –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 17:04

In short, static factories are cool and they have their uses, but some APIs fall into the trap of using them everywhere even when they don't add value and just add complexity.

One example of where static factory works well in Java is EnumSet which has a number of named builders could not be naturally implemented as overloaded constructors.

e.g. these don't do the same thing even though they have the same arguments.

EnumSet.of(E1, E3);
EnumSet.range(E1, E3);

Also EnumSet returns two different implementations based on the number of elements in the enum.

    if (universe.length <= 64)
        return new RegularEnumSet<>(elementType, universe);
    else
        return new JumboEnumSet<>(elementType, universe);

Unfortunately EnumMap doesn't do similarly and so there is only one implementation.


.1. For one you get better type inference. For example See Guava's

So Guava has methods like

List<TypeThatsTooLongForItsOwnGood> list = Lists.newArrayList();
Map<KeyType, LongishValueType> map = Maps.newLinkedHashMap();

which in Java 7 is just

List<TypeThatsTooLongForItsOwnGood> list = new ArrayList<>();
Map<KeyType, LongishValueType> map = new LinkedHashMap<>();

which is shorter, you don't need to learn any new methods and Java 6 you could do the following if you didn't need double checking of types.

List<TypeThatsTooLongForItsOwnGood> list = new ArrayList();
Map<KeyType, LongishValueType> map = new LinkedHashMap();

In Guava you have

Set<Type> copySet = Sets.newHashSet(elements);
List<String> theseElements = Lists.newArrayList("alpha", "beta", "gamma");

where as the built-in methods are

Set<Type> copySet = new HashSet<String>(elements);
List<String> theseElements = Arrays.asList("alpha", "beta", "gamma");

If you drop the <String> from HashSet you lose type safety but given most decent IDE will auto-complete this code for you, you won't actually be saving any typing.

.2. As a designer of the class you can later change what is returned with a static method.

I would say YAGNI, and it is very difficult in practice to significantly change the implementation transparently. It is highly unlikely you can drop in a replacement with full backward compatibility without having to rebuild or retest your code.

.3. Dealing with constructor inheritance is painful especially if you have to pre-calculate something.

This is true, but rare. For this situation I usually have a builder class for complex construction and a factor method alone wouldn't solve the problem.


Its worth considering that most classes in the Java Libraries use constructors rather than static factories. The only classes I can think of where constructors were used but later changed to use static factories where possible was the auto-boxing wrapper classes. The complexity of knowing which factory method to call is hidden by the language.

It seems given the current capabilities of Java there is no reason to make constructors public ... ever. Friendly, private, protected are OK but public no.

Just because you can do something doesn't make it good idea.

For example, you can make all your classes, methods and variables 1 or 2 characters long (you never need to use a name 3 letters or longer and some people believe this is better some how) but that does not make it is good idea.

BTW if you have looks at common UNIX commands, many are two characters long. ;)

It seems that its almost always a better idea to provide a public static method for creating objects.

Unless you prefer simplicity and not making your code needlessly complicated.

I have never seen this practice decreed or written down anywhere?

Neither have I. Possibly because its not a good idea. IMHO.

Is there a use case other than perhaps not being super DRY that I missed?

You haven't stated a good reason to do it, that's reason enough not to do it for me. ;)

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2  
+1 For Just because you can do something doesn't make it good idea. –  Amit Deshpande Oct 24 '12 at 16:52
1  
Did you mean does not in your 2nd paragraph 2nd last line? –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 16:59
    
@RohitJain Yes, thank you. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 24 '12 at 17:01
1  
I personally find it revealing that Josh Bloch wrote most of the collections APIs using public constructors -- and now recommends that you not follow that example, and use factories. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 24 '12 at 17:37
1  
@PeterLawrey Come on JAXB isn't that slow for XML databinding. I suppose your cumbersome remark meaning you can accidentally plugin in the wrong XML parser. Regardless you can use a different implementation like MOXy (thanks to static factory service provider pattern :) ). Also one of my favorite hackers Kohsuke co-wrote it... you know the guy who wrote Jenkins. –  Adam Gent Nov 19 '12 at 12:47

I do not think so. Constructors are needed to create objects. Constructors guarantee that object indeed created that is not correct for factory method that can return null.

The choice between constructors or factory methods depends on concrete use case. Sometimes constructor is better, sometimes factory methods have advantages.

I'd rather say that having static factory method into the class itself is bad practice in most cases. IMHO separation of class itself and its factory is preferable solution.

I do not think that all frameworks support factory methods. Spring and JAXB indeed support but for example HttpServlet, HttpFilter, EJB, Applet etc must have public default constructor. Even in case of spring usage of beans that have constructor is more convenient than beans that require factory method for their instanciation.

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+1 for the 3rd paragraph. Indeed that is something one should follow. rather than having them in the class itself. :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 24 '12 at 17:05
    
@AlexR almost every technology can call protected or private constructors. Hibernate in fact just ignores them altogether and will even set final variables (scary). –  Adam Gent Oct 24 '12 at 17:08

I can think of one use case for public constructors. If you use an annotation processing framework, you will need to implement a Processor. The compiler will use reflection to create an instance of your Processor. In order for the system to work, your implementation class should be public, not generic, and have a public no-args constructor.

So public constructors are probably useful for frameworks that use reflection.

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This is not true. Through reflection you can get access to protected and private methods (although supposedly I guess the security manager could get mad). JAXB, Jackson, etc... use reflection. –  Adam Gent Oct 24 '12 at 17:33
    
@AdamGent Yes you could get access to protected and private methods, but if the program that you are working with does not do that, then you need a public constructor. –  emory Oct 24 '12 at 17:35
    
I just haven't seen a library that will not use protected. So yeah your right if you have a library that will only use public methods but I have yet to see one. –  Adam Gent Oct 24 '12 at 17:41

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