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The documentation tells me that /D command-line switch can be used to do this, like so:

  CL /DDEBUG TEST.C

would define a DEBUG symbol, and

  CL /DDEBUG=2 TEST.C

would give it the value 2. But what do I do if I would like to get the equivalent of a string define, such as

  #define DEBUG "abc"

?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Due to the way command line is parsed in Windows, you'll have to escape the quotes.

CL /DDEBUG=\"abc\" TEST.C
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Have you tried

CL /DDEBUG=abc TEST.C

or

CL /DDEBUG="abc" TEST.C
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Thanks Glen, the second one could work on the command line, but the coworker I've asked this for eventually used this in the project definition (needing to escape the double-quotes and replace = with #):

/DDEBUG#\"abc\"
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I don't have VC to test this for you, however, in principle the following should work:

CL /DSTRINGIFY(X)=#X /DDEBUG=STRINGIFY(abc) TEST.C

Update:

As highlighted by Kuber-Ober, VC doesn't seem to do the right thing here. Testing with a simple example, it generates:

const char * s = STRINGIFY(abc);

It may work with other compilers, for example the following g++ command line works:

g++ -D'STRINGIFY(X)=#X' -D'DEBUG=STRINGIFY(abc)' t.cc -E

# 1 "t.cc"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command line>"
# 1 "t.cc"

const char * s = "abc";
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Unfortunately, at least under MSVC2012, you can't pass preprocessor definitions with arguments on the command line :( –  Kuba Ober Aug 22 at 13:33

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