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I'm trying to find the LINQ equivalent of the following code:

NameValueCollection nvc = new NameValueCollection();

List<BusinessLogic.Donation> donations = new List<BusinessLogic.Donation>();
donations.Add(new BusinessLogic.Donation(0, "", "", "");
donations.Add(new BusinessLogic.Donation(0, "", "", "");
donations.Add(new BusinessLogic.Donation(0, "", "", "");

for(var i = 0; i < donations.Count(); i++)
{
    // NOTE: item_number_ + i - I need to be able to do this
    nvc.Add("item_number_" + i, donations[i].AccountName);
}

I was hoping I could use something like:

NameValueCollection nvc = new NameValueCollection();

List<BusinessLogic.Donation> donations = new List<BusinessLogic.Donation>();
donations.Add(new BusinessLogic.Donation(0, "", "", "");
donations.Add(new BusinessLogic.Donation(0, "", "", "");
donations.Add(new BusinessLogic.Donation(0, "", "", "");

donations.ForEach(x => nvc.Add("item_name_" + ??, x.AccountName);

But I've not found a way to determine which iteration the loop is on. Any help would be appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
Does donations have an .IndexOf() method? –  Josh C. Oct 24 '12 at 17:17
    
You could do int i = 0; donations.ForEach(x=> nvc.Add("item_name_" + i++, ... but not sure how safe it is. –  lc. Oct 24 '12 at 17:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

LINQ doesn't have a ForEach method, and for good reason. LINQ is for performing queries. It is designed to get information from some data source. It is not designed to mutate data sources. LINQ queries shouldn't cause side effects, which is exactly what you're doing here.

The List class does have a ForEach method, which is what you are using. Because it's not actually in the System.Linq namespace it's not technically a part of LINQ.

There is nothing wrong with the for loop in your question. It would be wrong (from a good practice perspective) to try to change it in the way that you're trying to.

Here is a link that discusses the matter in more detail.

Now, if you want to ignore that advice and use a ForEach method anyway, it's not hard to write one that provides an index to the action:

public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Action<int, T> action)
{
    // argument null checking omitted
    int i = 0;
    foreach (T item in sequence)
    {
        action(i, item);
        i++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I've obviously used the wrong terminology. My collection of Donation does have a .ForEach() method. –  James Hill Oct 24 '12 at 17:23
    
ForEach isn't defined as an extension method of IEnumerable<T> and therefore isn't part of LINQ. –  devdigital Oct 24 '12 at 17:24
2  
@JamesHill It's a method of List. It's not a method in System.Linq –  Servy Oct 24 '12 at 17:24
    
@Servy, I think it's obvious that I need to step away from my computer for a while. I think coffee is in order. Thanks for setting me straight. –  James Hill Oct 24 '12 at 17:30
1  
+1 for the link to that article. I've wondered why there wasn't a LINQ implementation of ForEach, but that makes perfect sense. –  JDB Oct 24 '12 at 17:32

Is there any reason you're not using a Dictionary<string, string> as your names/keys appear to be unique? This would be faster and you could use the ToDictionary standard query operator.

Also, if you did wish to use an extension method (although as Servy says a for loop is the right solution here), then you could write your own - see here.

share|improve this answer

It's a little convoluted and creates an intermediate collection, but how about:

donations.Select((x, i) => new {Name = "item_name_" + i, x.AccountName})
    .ToList()
    .ForEach(x=> nvc.Add(x.Name, x.AccountName));

This uses the overload of Enumerable.Select which incorporates the index.

I do have to argue there is nothing really to gain from doing it this way. You create more overhead with the intermediate collection and IMHO lose readability over your original for-loop.

share|improve this answer

Piggybacking on the answer by @lc.

foreach (var x in donations.Select((d, i) => new {ItemName = "item_name_" + i, AccountName = d.AccountName}))
{
  nvc.Add(x.ItemName, x.AccountName);
}
share|improve this answer

Try this -

donations.ForEach(x =>
         {
             int index = donations.IndexOf(x);
             nvc.Add("item_name_" + index, x.AccountName);
         });
share|improve this answer
1  
Reasons for downvote would have been helpful. –  Rohit Vats Oct 24 '12 at 17:31
3  
You're better off enumerating an intermediate collection with indices (a la @lc's answer) than searching the list on every iteration (.IndexOf) –  Austin Salonen Oct 24 '12 at 17:35
3  
What would happen if an item was in the list multiple times? (Note that in the OP's code all of the items are identical.) It's not just about the terrible performance after all; it doesn't even work. –  Servy Oct 24 '12 at 17:37
1  
@Sevy - Oops..!! Yeah it makes sense now to me. Just completely forget the uniqueness part. Downvotes accepted with honour now. :) –  Rohit Vats Oct 24 '12 at 17:40
1  
@Sevy - Yeah thanks Servy got the point now..That's why i said atleast tell me where i am wrong. –  Rohit Vats Oct 24 '12 at 17:41

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