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I have a Java EE 6 web application and use the WebSocket protocol to communicate with browsers. The browser can send various types of messages and in the servers onMessage method I would like to route (or dispatch) the message to a specific message handler class depending on the message type. I would like to configure or register these message handlers via annotations, similar to the mechanism of servlets (@WebServlet("/there")). And like in servlets, I would like to be able to use CDI injection in the message handlers.

For now I have a MessageType annotation, a MessageHandler interface and 3 implementations.

@Documented
@Target(ElementType.TYPE)
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
public @interface MessageType
{
    String value();
}


public interface MessageHandler
{
    public void processMessage(String inputMesssage);
}


@MessageType("first")
public class FirstMessageHandler implements MessageHandler
{
    @Inject
    ResourceBundleProvider resourceBundleProvider;

    @Override
    public void processMessage(String inputMesssage)
    {
        System.out.println("FirstMessageHandler#processMessage: " + inputMesssage);
        System.out.println("InjectionTest: " + resourceBundleProvider.getValue("label.language"));
    }
}


@MessageType("second")
public class SecondMessageHandler implements MessageHandler
{
    @Override
    public void processMessage(String inputMesssage)
    {
        System.out.println("SecondMessageHandler#processMessage: " + inputMesssage);
    }
}


public class DefaultMessageHandler implements MessageHandler
{
    @Override
    public void processMessage(String inputMesssage)
    {
        System.out.println("DefaultMessageHandler#processMessage: " + inputMesssage);
    }
}

I also have a class MessageDispatcher which uses reflections to scan the classpath for the annotated message handlers, instantiates them and puts them into a map:

@ApplicationScoped
public class MessageDispatcher
{
    private Map<String, MessageHandler> messageHandlerMap = new HashMap<String, MessageHandler>();

    @Inject
    DefaultMessageHandler defaultMessageHandler;

    public MessageDispatcher()
    {
        registerAnnotatedHandlers();
    }

    private void registerAnnotatedHandlers()
    {
        Reflections reflections = new Reflections("namespace");

        try
        {
            for (Class<?> annotatedClass : reflections.getTypesAnnotatedWith(MessageType.class))
            {
                String annotationValue = annotatedClass.getAnnotation(MessageType.class).value();

                for (Class<?> interfaceClass : annotatedClass.getInterfaces())
                    if (!annotationValue.isEmpty() && interfaceClass.equals(MessageHandler.class))
                        messageHandlerMap.put(annotationValue, (MessageHandler) annotatedClass.newInstance());
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }       
    }

    public MessageHandler getMessageHandler(String key)
    {
        MessageHandler messageHandler = messageHandlerMap.get(key);

        return messageHandler != null ? messageHandler : defaultMessageHandler;
    }
}

And finally in my websocket servlet's onMessage method I extract the key from the inbound message and use it for the message routing:

public synchronized void onMessage(String data)
{
    String[] message = data.split(":");

    // Choose the message handler from the message
    MessageHandler messageHandler = messageDispatcher.getMessageHandler(message[0]);

    // Process the message by the message handler
    messageHandler.processMessage(message[1]);
}

My 3 incoming sample messages are:

"first:Message to handle with FirstMessageHandler"
"second:Message to handle with SecondMessageHandler"
"third:Message to handle with DefaultMessageHandler"

This works fine, The first and second messages are processed by FirstMessageHandler and SecondMessageHandler respectively. The third message is processed by the default message handler since there is no other handler registered for handling the key "third".

My Problem: I cannot use injection in the message handlers because they are created using Java reflection. Does anybody know how to get annotation processing and CDI injection 'married'? Or does anybody think this approach is bullshit and has another solution for that?

Best Regards
Sebastian

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2 Answers 2

I think your simplest solution to this would be to keep what you have, strip out the scanning because you don't need it, change your annotation to be a qualifier and fire a CDI event with the qualifier (you'll need to create an AnnotationLiteral for each of three different qualifiers because the value is binding) and the message as the payload.

I can explain more if you need it.

share|improve this answer
    
I am wondering how the events are actually fired. In the various CDI events examples found in the internet the events are somehow injected. To me this approachs seems a bit overkill and very static, since I have to define qualifiers for each new type of messages. –  Sebastian Oct 26 '12 at 12:11
    
Yes, the events are injected. You only need to create one qualifier (which you already have the annotation so you're half way there) and a literal. The literal will need create an instance of your annotation with the correct value and you'll use that when you fire your event. –  LightGuard Oct 26 '12 at 19:12
    
It would be great if you could give a little example. Particularly howto fire the events upon incoming websocket messages. The charm of my initial approach is that I can use the key from within each message to choose the appropriate message handler out of a map of registered handlers without having a big static if-else-construct. I would like to keep that concept somehow and additionally have the message handlers to be managed by the CDI container in order to inject other dependencies into them. –  Sebastian Oct 29 '12 at 11:02
    
I wrote this in vim, haven't compiled it, but this should give you an idea pastebin example –  LightGuard Oct 29 '12 at 18:23
    
I tried it that way, but at the end I did not know how to register the handlers or at least the message keys in a central place (my messageHandlerMap). But I learned a lot about CDI events and qualifiers or annotations in general. But regarding the AnnotationLiteral, I am wondering why the compiler complains about the class MessageTypeLiteral implementing the MessageType interface. The warning is: "The annotation type MessageType should not be used as a superinterface for MessageTypeLiteral". For now, I suppressed the warning since I still use the AnnotationLiteral. –  Sebastian Oct 30 '12 at 18:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is my final approach:

I spend a PostConstruct method to my MessageDispachter where I look for all message handler beans. For each of these beans I get their annotation value and a reference to the bean (which also includes creation of the bean). Then I store both, the annotation value and the bean reference into my messageHandlerMap. There is a lot of CDI delegating and interception involved, but it works:

public class MessageDispatcher
{
    private Map<String, MessageHandler> messageHandlerMap = new HashMap<String, MessageHandler>();

    @Inject
    DefaultMessageHandler defaultMessageHandler;

    @Inject
    BeanManager beanManager;

    @PostConstruct
    public void registerHandlers()
    {
        Set<Bean<?>> messageHandlerBeans = beanManager.getBeans(MessageHandler.class, new MessageTypeLiteral());
        for (Bean<?> bean : messageHandlerBeans)
        {
            String key = bean.getBeanClass().getAnnotation(MessageType.class).value();

            if (!key.isEmpty())
            {
                CreationalContext<?> creationalContext = beanManager.createCreationalContext(bean);
                MessageHandler messageHandler = (MessageHandler) beanManager.getReference(bean, MessageHandler.class, creationalContext);
                messageHandlerMap.put(key, messageHandler);
            }
        }
    }

    public MessageHandler getMessageHandler(String key)
    {
        MessageHandler messageHandler = (MessageHandler) messageHandlerMap.get(key);
        return messageHandler != null ? messageHandler : defaultMessageHandler;
    }
}


@Documented
@Qualifier
@Retention(RUNTIME)
@Target({TYPE, METHOD, FIELD, PARAMETER})
public @interface MessageType
{
    @Nonbinding
    String value();
}


@SuppressWarnings("all")
public class MessageTypeLiteral extends AnnotationLiteral<MessageType> implements MessageType
{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Override
    public String value()
    {
        return "";
    }
}


public class DefaultMessageHandler implements MessageHandler
{
    @Inject
    ResourceBundleProvider resourceBundleProvider;

    @Override
    public void processMessage(String inputMesssage)
    {
...


@MessageType("first")
public class FirstMessageHandler implements MessageHandler
{
    @Inject
    ResourceBundleProvider resourceBundleProvider;

    @Override
    public void processMessage(String inputMesssage)
    {
...

The @NonBinding annotation in the @MessageType annotation seems to be important to find all beans annotated with @MessageType("xxx") independent of the actual annotation value (here: xxx).

I hope this explains the important things. For further details please ask me

Sebastian

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