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I have a php class Assets. Within Assets there are a variety of public functions which handle assets (caching, minifying, combining...). One of the public functions contains a secondary function which is required to perform a preg_replace_callback(). This inner function needs to access one of the other public functions but I am having trouble calling the other functions.

Here is the setup:

class Assets
{

    public function img($file)
    {

        $image['location'] = $this->image_dir.$file;
        $image['content'] = file_get_contents($image['location']);
        $image['hash'] = md5($image['content']);
        $image['fileInfo'] = pathinfo($image['location']);

        return $this->cache('img',$image);

    }

    public function css($content)
    {

        . . .

        function parseCSS($matched){

            return $this->img($matched); // THIS LINE NEEDS TO REFERENCE function img()

        }

        $mend = preg_replace_callback(
            '#\<parse\>(.+?)\<\/parse\>#i',
            'parseCSS',
            $this->combined_css
        );

        . . .

    }

}

Here's what I have tried:

$this->img($matched)

Error: Using $this when not in object context - Refers to $this-> inside of parseCSS()

Assets::img($matched)

Error: Using $this when not in object context - Refers to $this-> inside of img()

So, how can I access a public function with $this from within an inner function?

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closed as not a real question by PeeHaa, Baba, tereško, mah, bensiu Oct 25 '12 at 2:58

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Why are you wrapping functions in methods? That doesn't do what you think it does. –  PeeHaa Oct 24 '12 at 18:11
1  
^ It's also bad practice. Maintainability goes out the window.. –  Steve Oct 24 '12 at 18:11
2  
Bro, don't declare a function within a function. –  wesside Oct 24 '12 at 18:11
9  
Yo dawg, I heard you like functions... :) –  Joe Oct 24 '12 at 18:12
    
^hahahaha, thats great. +1 –  wesside Oct 24 '12 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This would be more appropriate:

public function css($content)
{
    //. . .
    $mend = preg_replace_callback(
        '#\<parse\>(.+?)\<\/parse\>#i',
        array($this, 'parseCSS'),
        $this->combined_css
    );
    //. . .
}

public function parseCSS($matched){
    return $this->img($matched); // THIS LINE NEEDS TO REFERENCE function img()
}

Your original approach causes parseCSS to be defined every time css is called -- which will probably result in a fatal error were you to ever call css twice. All questions of scope are also much more straightforward in my revised example. In your original example, parseCSS is a function in the global scope, and not associated with your class.

Edit: Valid callback formulations are documented here: http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.callable.php

// Type 1: Simple callback
call_user_func('my_callback_function'); 

// Type 2: Static class method call
call_user_func(array('MyClass', 'myCallbackMethod')); 

// Type 3: Object method call
call_user_func(array($obj, 'myCallbackMethod'));

// Type 4: Static class method call (As of PHP 5.2.3)
call_user_func('MyClass::myCallbackMethod');

// Type 5: Relative static class method call (As of PHP 5.3.0)
call_user_func(array('B', 'parent::who')); // A

//Type 6: Closure
$double = function($a) {
    return $a * 2;
};

$new_numbers = array_map($double, $numbers);

A closure-based solution is also possible as of PHP 5.4 -- this would actually be similar to what you originally intended.

share|improve this answer
    
I was not aware that I could include scope within that second parameter. I had tried to remove parseCSS into a private function, but passing '$this->parseCSS' as the second parameter in preg_replace_callback did not work. The code you provided works wonderfully. Thanks! –  VictorKilo Oct 24 '12 at 18:57

That doesn't do what you think it does. That "inner" function is just another function in the global scope:

<?php
class Foo
{
    public function bar()
    {
        echo 'in bar';

        function baz() {
            echo 'in baz';
        }
    }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$foo->bar();
baz();

Also note that it will result in a fatal error when calling the bar method more than once:

<?php
class Foo
{
    public function bar()
    {
        echo 'in bar';

        function baz() {
            echo 'in baz';
        }
    }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$foo->bar();
$foo->bar();
baz();

Fatal error: Cannot redeclare baz() (previously declared in /code/8k1

You should go the way as Frank Farmer answered although I would not make that method public.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 good additional info –  JvdBerg Oct 24 '12 at 18:23
    
Thanks for the info, I was clearly mixing up some of my javascript and php knowledge... or lack there of. –  VictorKilo Oct 24 '12 at 21:08

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