Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I used to have:

using (MyWebClient client = new MyWebClient(TimeoutInSeconds))
{
   var res = client.DownloadData(par.Base_url);
   //code that checks res
}

Now I have:

using (MyWebClient client = new MyWebClient(TimeoutInSeconds))
{
   client.DownloadDataAsync(new Uri(par.Base_url));
   client.DownloadDataCompleted += (sender, e) =>
   {
       //code that checks e.Result
   }
}    

Where MyWebClient is derived from WebClient. Now I have lots of threads doing this and in the first case memory consumption wasn't an issue while in the second one I see steady rise in memory until I get OutOfMemoryException. I profiled and it seems that WebClient is the culprit, not being disposed and downloaded data is kept. But why? What's the difference between two cases? Perhaps e.Result needs to be somehow disposed of?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your first case limits the number of concurrent downloads to the number of threads. Your second case has no limit on the number of concurrent downloads.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, that's right, but I doubt it's the cause, since in both cases same number of threads were doing work. It's just that the second case doesn't keep the thread busy all the time. –  ren Oct 24 '12 at 18:20
    
In the second case, it doesn't matter how many threads were doing work. That doesn't impose a limit. Only in the first case does the number of threads set a limit on the number of concurrent downloads. –  David Schwartz Oct 24 '12 at 18:25
    
@ren In the second example a single thread could fire off dozens of requests before the first one even got back. Dozens of requests per thread leads to consuming more memory than one concurrent request per thread. –  Servy Oct 24 '12 at 18:26
    
@Servy That's right, but in my case each thread only fired one download and in both cases number of threads were the same. Since there is no quick "gotcha" answer I bet I overlooked something. –  ren Oct 24 '12 at 18:32
    
@ren: I think if you look more closely, you'll find that's probably not the case. To confirm, add code to increment an atomic counter when you construct and decrement it when DownloadDataCompleted fires. I think you'll find the counter gets higher than you think. –  David Schwartz Oct 24 '12 at 18:35
show 1 more comment

You are disposing of your WebClient immediately in the second option. You have a couple of choices:

  1. If you're using .NET 4.5 (or .NET 4.0 with Visual Studio 2012 and the AsyncTargetingPack installed), you can do var res = await client.DownloadDataAsync(par.Base_url); and have code that looks similar to your first line but is actually asynchronous.
  2. Use a normal continuation and get rid of your using block

The first option would look like this:

using (MyWebClient client = new MyWebClient(TimeoutInSeconds))
{
   var res = await client.DownloadDataAsync(par.Base_url);
   //code that checks res
}

The second option would look like this:

var client = new MyWebClient(TimeoutInSeconds);

client.DownloadDataAsync(new Uri(par.Base_url))
    .ContinueWith(t =>
    {
        client.Dispose();

        var res = t.Result;

        //code that checks res
    }
}  

HOWEVER

You must change your threading approach depending on which solution you use. The first version of your code runs synchronously, so if you have a thread dedicated to a URL (or connection or however it is you're splitting them up), the downloads will run synchronously on that thread and block it. If you choose either of these options, however, you'll end up using IO completion threads to complete your work, splitting it out from the main thread. In the long run, this is probably better, but it means you have to be mindful about how many of these requests you submit in parallel.

share|improve this answer
    
But does this mean that my using statement didn't somehow dispose WebClient and hence the issue? –  ren Oct 24 '12 at 18:25
    
@ren No, it means that you're disposing of it before you're actually done with it. –  Servy Oct 24 '12 at 18:25
    
@Servy But then I would have exception while trying to use it in the completed event, wouldn't I? –  ren Oct 24 '12 at 18:28
1  
@ren That depends entirely on how it's implemented. –  Servy Oct 24 '12 at 18:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.