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I'm searching for an elegant way to convert a normal Python dict with some nested dicts to an object.

For example:

>>> d = {'a': 1, 'b': {'c': 2}, 'd': ["hi", {'foo': "bar"}]}

Should be accessible in this way:

>>> x = dict2obj(d)
>>> x.a
1
>>> x.b.c
2
>>> x.d[1].foo
bar

I think, this is not possible without recursion, but what would be a nice way to get an objectstyle for dicts?

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
3  
I was trying to do something similar recently, but a recurring dictionary key ("from" - which is a Python keyword) prevented me from going through with it. Because as soon as you tried using "x.from" to access that attribute you'd get a syntax error. –  Dawie Strauss Aug 20 '09 at 13:08
1  
that's a problem indeed, but i can abandon on "from" to make life easier in accessing large dict constructs :) typing x['a']['d'][1]['foo'] is really annoying, so x.a.d[1].foo rules. if you need from, you can access it via getattr(x, 'from') or use _from as attribute instead. –  Marc Aug 20 '09 at 15:51
3  
from_ rather than _from according to PEP 8. –  Kos Jan 14 '13 at 7:32
    
You can use getattr(x, 'from') instead of renaming the attribute. –  George V. Reilly Feb 19 '13 at 2:16
1  
Most of these "solutions" don't seem to work (even the accepted one, doesn't allow nested d1.b.c), I think it's clear you should be using something from a library, e.g. namedtuple from collections, as this answer suggests, ... –  Andy Hayden Apr 29 '13 at 14:50

27 Answers 27

up vote 372 down vote accepted

Update: In Python 2.6 and onwards, consider whether the namedtuple data structure suits your needs:

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> MyStruct = namedtuple('MyStruct', 'a b d')
>>> s = MyStruct(a=1, b={'c': 2}, d=['hi'])
>>> s
MyStruct(a=1, b={'c': 2}, d=['hi'])
>>> s.a
1
>>> s.b
{'c': 2}
>>> s.c
>>> s.d
['hi']

The alternative (original answer contents) is:

class Struct:
    def __init__(self, **entries): 
        self.__dict__.update(entries)

Then, you can use:

>>> args = {'a': 1, 'b': 2}
>>> s = Struct(**args)
>>> s
<__main__.Struct instance at 0x01D6A738>
>>> s.a
1
>>> s.b
2
share|improve this answer
66  
+1 wow. You don't want to SEE the code that I can rip out of my app thanks to this. –  Chris Lawlor May 26 '10 at 19:10
12  
Same here - this is particularly useful for reconstructing Python objects from document oriented databases like MongoDB. –  mikemaccana Nov 22 '10 at 11:29
10  
To get prettier printing add: def repr__(self): return '<%s>' % str('\n '.join('%s : %s' % (k, repr(v)) for (k, v) in self.__dict.iteritems())) –  Cixate Jan 21 '11 at 16:35
7  
Will this work with nested dictionaries? and dicts containing objects and or list etc. Are there any catches? –  Sam Stoelinga Apr 14 '11 at 12:13
5  
@Sam S: it won't create nested Structs from nested dictionaries, but in general the type of the value can be anything. Key is restricted to being suitable for an object slot –  Eli Bendersky Apr 14 '11 at 12:15
class obj(object):
    def __init__(self, d):
        for a, b in d.items():
            if isinstance(b, (list, tuple)):
               setattr(self, a, [obj(x) if isinstance(x, dict) else x for x in b])
            else:
               setattr(self, a, obj(b) if isinstance(b, dict) else b)


>>> x = obj(d)
>>> x.b.c
2
>>> x.d[1].foo
'bar'
share|improve this answer
3  
Good! I'd replace .items() by .iteritems(), though, for a smaller memory footprint. –  EOL Aug 20 '09 at 13:58
2  
If not an OP requirement, this is not an issue - but note that this won't recursively process objects in lists within lists. –  Anon Aug 20 '09 at 14:09
    
Nice! But then the dict needs to be complete when you create the class... I guess that works... you could create another instance if you modify the dict. Good stuff! –  Kieveli Aug 20 '09 at 14:21
1  
I realise this is an old answer, but these days it would be better to use an abstract base class instead of that ugly line if isinstance(b, (list, tuple)): –  wim Apr 30 '13 at 1:15
1  
Tip: Have the obj class inherit from argparse.Namespace for additional features like readable string representation. –  Serrano Pereira Apr 11 at 15:27
x = type('new_dict', (object,), d)

then add recursion to this and you're done.

edit this is how I'd implement it:

>>> d
{'a': 1, 'b': {'c': 2}, 'd': ['hi', {'foo': 'bar'}]}
>>> def obj_dic(d):
    top = type('new', (object,), d)
    seqs = tuple, list, set, frozenset
    for i, j in d.items():
    	if isinstance(j, dict):
    	    setattr(top, i, obj_dic(j))
    	elif isinstance(j, seqs):
    	    setattr(top, i, 
    		    type(j)(obj_dic(sj) if isinstance(sj, dict) else sj for sj in j))
    	else:
    	    setattr(top, i, j)
    return top

>>> x = obj_dic(d)
>>> x.a
1
>>> x.b.c
2
>>> x.d[1].foo
'bar'
share|improve this answer
1  
Please show how one could add recursion to this. –  Aaron Digulla Aug 20 '09 at 11:36
    
thanks for your answer. but where in detail should i add recursion? to x? or should i implement getattr and do lazy convert on request? –  Marc Aug 20 '09 at 11:38
    
added recursion implementation. –  SilentGhost Aug 20 '09 at 13:26
2  
+1 for using type, kinda scary the number of answers duplicating functionality already built into the language –  Mark Roddy Nov 19 '09 at 17:36
1  
Why are you creating type-objects and not instantiating them? Wouldn't that be more logical? I mean, why not do top_instance = top() and returning that where you return top? –  pancake Jan 21 at 0:14

Taking what I feel are the best aspects of the previous examples, here's what I came up with:

class Struct:
  '''The recursive class for building and representing objects with.'''
  def __init__(self, obj):
    for k, v in obj.iteritems():
      if isinstance(v, dict):
        setattr(self, k, Struct(v))
      else:
        setattr(self, k, v)
  def __getitem__(self, val):
    return self.__dict__[val]
  def __repr__(self):
    return '{%s}' % str(', '.join('%s : %s' % (k, repr(v)) for
      (k, v) in self.__dict__.iteritems()))
share|improve this answer
    
Note that the constructor can be shortened to: def __init__(self, dct): for k, v in dct.iteritems(): setattr(self, k, isinstance(v, dict) and self.__class__(v) or v) which also removes the explicit call to Struct –  George V. Reilly Feb 19 '13 at 1:26
    
I'd rather not downvote my own answer, but looking back on this I've noticed that it doesn't recurse into sequence types. x.d[1].foo fails in this case. –  andyvanee Feb 20 '13 at 7:06
    
the isinstance(v, dict) check would be better as isinstance(v, collections.Mapping) so it can handle future dict-like things –  hobs Jul 16 '13 at 20:55

For anyone who happens to stumble upon this question nowadays. In Python 2.6+ there's a collection helper called namedtuple, that can do this for you:

from collections import namedtuple

d_named = namedtuple('Struct', d.keys())(*d.values())

In [7]: d_named
Out[7]: Struct(a=1, b={'c': 2}, d=['hi', {'foo': 'bar'}])

In [8]: d_named.a
Out[8]: 1
share|improve this answer
6  
This does not answer the question of recursion for the nested dicts. –  derigible Oct 21 '13 at 22:40
class Struct(object):
    """Comment removed"""
    def __init__(self, data):
        for name, value in data.iteritems():
            setattr(self, name, self._wrap(value))

    def _wrap(self, value):
        if isinstance(value, (tuple, list, set, frozenset)): 
            return type(value)([self._wrap(v) for v in value])
        else:
            return Struct(value) if isinstance(value, dict) else value

Can be used with any sequence/dict/value structure of any depth.

share|improve this answer
    
This should be the answer. It works well for nesting. You can use this as an object_hook for json.load() as well. –  010110110101 Feb 15 at 16:14
    
Similar to SilentGhost's functional answer from 2009 --the leaf node data is accessible, but the parent/twigs display as object references. To pretty-print, def __repr__(self): return '{%s}' % str(', '.join("'%s': %s" % (k, repr(v)) for (k, v) in self.__dict__.iteritems())) –  MarkHu Oct 16 at 7:33

Surprisingly no one has mentioned Bunch. This library is exclusively meant to provide attribute style access to dict objects and does exactly what the OP wants. A demonstration:

>>> from bunch import bunchify
>>> d = {'a': 1, 'b': {'c': 2}, 'd': ["hi", {'foo': "bar"}]}
>>> x = bunchify(d)
>>> x.a
1
>>> x.b.c
2
>>> x.d[1].foo
'bar'
share|improve this answer
    
And there is a python 3 compatible (appears to be 2.6-3.4) branch of Bunch named Munch: github.com/Infinidat/munch –  LordZ Jul 28 at 20:19
>>> def dict2obj(d):
        if isinstance(d, list):
    	    d = [dict2obj(x) for x in d]
        if not isinstance(d, dict):
            return d
        class C(object):
    	    pass
        o = C()
        for k in d:
            o.__dict__[k] = dict2obj(d[k])
        return o


>>> d = {'a': 1, 'b': {'c': 2}, 'd': ["hi", {'foo': "bar"}]}
>>> x = dict2obj(d)
>>> x.a
1
>>> x.b.c
2
>>> x.d[1].foo
'bar'
share|improve this answer

If your dict is coming from json.loads(), you can turn it into an object instead (rather than a dict) in one line:

import json
from collections import namedtuple

json.loads(data, object_hook=lambda d: namedtuple('X', d.keys())(*d.values()))

See also How to convert JSON data into a Python object.

share|improve this answer

x.__dict__.update(d) should do fine.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your answer, but what is x? the dict or a standard object? could you give me a hint please. –  Marc Aug 20 '09 at 11:35
    
x is your object. Every object has a dict. By updating the dict of a object you are actually updating the key vars in it. –  Alex Rodrigues Aug 20 '09 at 11:58
    
The bold words are _ _ dict _ _ –  Alex Rodrigues Aug 20 '09 at 11:59
6  
This won't handle nested dictionaries. –  FogleBird Aug 20 '09 at 13:30

This should get your started:

class dict2obj(object):
    def __init__(self, d):
        self.__dict__['d'] = d

    def __getattr__(self, key):
        value = self.__dict__['d'][key]
        if type(value) == type({}):
            return dict2obj(value)

        return value

d = {'a': 1, 'b': {'c': 2}, 'd': ["hi", {'foo': "bar"}]}

x = dict2obj(d)
print x.a
print x.b.c
print x.d[1].foo

It doesn't work for lists, yet. You'll have to wrap the lists in a UserList and overload __getitem__ to wrap dicts.

share|improve this answer
2  
To make it work for lists, use the if isinstance(d, list) clause from Anon's answer. –  Vinay Sajip Aug 20 '09 at 11:56

If you want to access dict keys as an object (or as a dict for difficult keys), do it recursively, and also be able to update the original dict, you could do:

class Dictate(object):
    """Object view of a dict, updating the passed in dict when values are set
    or deleted. "Dictate" the contents of a dict...: """

    def __init__(self, d):
        # since __setattr__ is overridden, self.__dict = d doesn't work
        object.__setattr__(self, '_Dictate__dict', d)

    # Dictionary-like access / updates
    def __getitem__(self, name):
        value = self.__dict[name]
        if isinstance(value, dict):  # recursively view sub-dicts as objects
            value = Dictate(value)
        return value

    def __setitem__(self, name, value):
        self.__dict[name] = value
    def __delitem__(self, name):
        del self.__dict[name]

    # Object-like access / updates
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return self[name]

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        self[name] = value
    def __delattr__(self, name):
        del self[name]

    def __repr__(self):
        return "%s(%r)" % (type(self).__name__, self.__dict)
    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.__dict)

Example usage:

d = {'a': 'b', 1: 2}
dd = Dictate(d)
assert dd.a == 'b'  # Access like an object
assert dd[1] == 2  # Access like a dict
# Updates affect d
dd.c = 'd'
assert d['c'] == 'd'
del dd.a
del dd[1]
# Inner dicts are mapped
dd.e = {}
dd.e.f = 'g'
assert dd['e'].f == 'g'
assert d == {'c': 'd', 'e': {'f': 'g'}}
share|improve this answer

I stumbled upon the case I needed to recursively convert a list of dicts to list of objects, so based on Roberto's snippet here what did the work for me:

def dict2obj(d):
    if isinstance(d, dict):
        n = {}
        for item in d:
            if isinstance(d[item], dict):
                n[item] = dict2obj(d[item])
            elif isinstance(d[item], (list, tuple)):
                n[item] = [dict2obj(elem) for elem in d[item]]
            else:
                n[item] = d[item]
        return type('obj_from_dict', (object,), n)
    elif isinstance(d, (list, tuple,)):
        l = []
        for item in d:
            l.append(dict2obj(item))
        return l
    else:
        return d

Note that any tuple will be converted to its list equivalent, for obvious reasons.

Hope this helps someone as much as all your answers did for me, guys.

share|improve this answer

Wanted to upload my version of this little paradigm.

class Struct(dict):
  def __init__(self,data):
    for key, value in data.items():
      if isinstance(value, dict):
        setattr(self, key, Struct(value))
      else:   
        setattr(self, key, type(value).__init__(value))

      dict.__init__(self,data)

It preserves the attributes for the type that's imported into the class. My only concern would be overwriting methods from within the dictionary your parsing. But otherwise seems solid!

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect for my use case -- thanks! –  shino Sep 10 '12 at 3:15
    
Although a nice idea, this doesn't seem to work for the OP's example, in fact it seems to modify the passed in dictionary! In fact, df.a doesn't even work. –  Andy Hayden Apr 29 '13 at 14:33

Here is another way to implement SilentGhost's original suggestion:

def dict2obj(d):
  if isinstance(d, dict):
    n = {}
    for item in d:
      if isinstance(d[item], dict):
        n[item] = dict2obj(d[item])
      elif isinstance(d[item], (list, tuple)):
        n[item] = [dict2obj(elem) for elem in d[item]]
      else:
        n[item] = d[item]
    return type('obj_from_dict', (object,), n)
  else:
    return d
share|improve this answer
    
Sweet. I've added my own take adding list/tuple arg handling based on your version. –  NiKo Apr 24 '11 at 16:49

Here's another implementation:

class DictObj(object):
    def __init__(self, d):
        self.__dict__ = d

def dict_to_obj(d):
    if isinstance(d, (list, tuple)): return map(dict_to_obj, d)
    elif not isinstance(d, dict): return d
    return DictObj(dict((k, dict_to_obj(v)) for (k,v) in d.iteritems()))

[Edit] Missed bit about also handling dicts within lists, not just other dicts. Added fix.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that setting dict to the source dictionary means that any changes to attributes on the resulting object will also affect the dictionary that created the object, and vice-versa. This may lead to unexpected results if the dictionary is used for something other than creating the object. –  Mark Roddy Nov 19 '09 at 17:40
    
@Mark: Actually, a new dictionary is being passed to DictObj every time, rather than just passing through the same dict object, so this won't actually occur. It's neccessary to do this, as I need to translate the values within a dictionary as well, so it would be impossible to pass through the original dict object without mutating it myself. –  Brian Nov 25 '09 at 16:23

Old Q&A, but I get something more to talk. Seems no one talk about recursive dict. This is my code:

#!/usr/bin/env python

class Object( dict ):
    def __init__( self, data = None ):
        super( Object, self ).__init__()
        if data:
            self.__update( data, {} )

    def __update( self, data, did ):
        dataid = id(data)
        did[ dataid ] = self

        for k in data:
            dkid = id(data[k])
            if did.has_key(dkid):
                self[k] = did[dkid]
            elif isinstance( data[k], Object ):
                self[k] = data[k]
            elif isinstance( data[k], dict ):
                obj = Object()
                obj.__update( data[k], did )
                self[k] = obj
                obj = None
            else:
                self[k] = data[k]

    def __getattr__( self, key ):
        return self.get( key, None )

    def __setattr__( self, key, value ):
        if isinstance(value,dict):
            self[key] = Object( value )
        else:
            self[key] = value

    def update( self, *args ):
        for obj in args:
            for k in obj:
                if isinstance(obj[k],dict):
                    self[k] = Object( obj[k] )
                else:
                    self[k] = obj[k]
        return self

    def merge( self, *args ):
        for obj in args:
            for k in obj:
                if self.has_key(k):
                    if isinstance(self[k],list) and isinstance(obj[k],list):
                        self[k] += obj[k]
                    elif isinstance(self[k],list):
                        self[k].append( obj[k] )
                    elif isinstance(obj[k],list):
                        self[k] = [self[k]] + obj[k]
                    elif isinstance(self[k],Object) and isinstance(obj[k],Object):
                        self[k].merge( obj[k] )
                    elif isinstance(self[k],Object) and isinstance(obj[k],dict):
                        self[k].merge( obj[k] )
                    else:
                        self[k] = [ self[k], obj[k] ]
                else:
                    if isinstance(obj[k],dict):
                        self[k] = Object( obj[k] )
                    else:
                        self[k] = obj[k]
        return self

def test01():
    class UObject( Object ):
        pass
    obj = Object({1:2})
    d = {}
    d.update({
        "a": 1,
        "b": {
            "c": 2,
            "d": [ 3, 4, 5 ],
            "e": [ [6,7], (8,9) ],
            "self": d,
        },
        1: 10,
        "1": 11,
        "obj": obj,
    })
    x = UObject(d)


    assert x.a == x["a"] == 1
    assert x.b.c == x["b"]["c"] == 2
    assert x.b.d[0] == 3
    assert x.b.d[1] == 4
    assert x.b.e[0][0] == 6
    assert x.b.e[1][0] == 8
    assert x[1] == 10
    assert x["1"] == 11
    assert x[1] != x["1"]
    assert id(x) == id(x.b.self.b.self) == id(x.b.self)
    assert x.b.self.a == x.b.self.b.self.a == 1

    x.x = 12
    assert x.x == x["x"] == 12
    x.y = {"a":13,"b":[14,15]}
    assert x.y.a == 13
    assert x.y.b[0] == 14

def test02():
    x = Object({
        "a": {
            "b": 1,
            "c": [ 2, 3 ]
        },
        1: 6,
        2: [ 8, 9 ],
        3: 11,
    })
    y = Object({
        "a": {
            "b": 4,
            "c": [ 5 ]
        },
        1: 7,
        2: 10,
        3: [ 12 , 13 ],
    })
    z = {
        3: 14,
        2: 15,
        "a": {
            "b": 16,
            "c": 17,
        }
    }
    x.merge( y, z )
    assert 2 in x.a.c
    assert 3 in x.a.c
    assert 5 in x.a.c
    assert 1 in x.a.b
    assert 4 in x.a.b
    assert 8 in x[2]
    assert 9 in x[2]
    assert 10 in x[2]
    assert 11 in x[3]
    assert 12 in x[3]
    assert 13 in x[3]
    assert 14 in x[3]
    assert 15 in x[2]
    assert 16 in x.a.b
    assert 17 in x.a.c

if __name__ == '__main__':
    test01()
    test02()
share|improve this answer

I think a dict consists of number, string and dict is enough most time. So I ignore the situation that tuples, lists and other types not appearing in the final dimension of a dict.

Considering inheritance, combined with recursion, it solves the print problem conveniently and also provides two ways to query a data,one way to edit a data.

See the example below, a dict that describes some information about students:

group=["class1","class2","class3","class4",]
rank=["rank1","rank2","rank3","rank4","rank5",]
data=["name","sex","height","weight","score"]

#build a dict based on the lists above
student_dic=dict([(g,dict([(r,dict([(d,'') for d in data])) for r in rank ]))for g in group])

#this is the solution
class dic2class(dict):
    def __init__(self, dic):
        for key,val in dic.items():
            self.__dict__[key]=self[key]=dic2class(val) if isinstance(val,dict) else val


student_class=dic2class(student_dic)

#one way to edit:
student_class.class1.rank1['sex']='male'
student_class.class1.rank1['name']='Nan Xiang'

#two ways to query:
print student_class.class1.rank1
print student_class.class1['rank1']
print '-'*50
for rank in student_class.class1:
    print getattr(student_class.class1,rank)

Results:

{'score': '', 'sex': 'male', 'name': 'Nan Xiang', 'weight': '', 'height': ''}
{'score': '', 'sex': 'male', 'name': 'Nan Xiang', 'weight': '', 'height': ''}
--------------------------------------------------
{'score': '', 'sex': '', 'name': '', 'weight': '', 'height': ''}
{'score': '', 'sex': '', 'name': '', 'weight': '', 'height': ''}
{'score': '', 'sex': 'male', 'name': 'Nan Xiang', 'weight': '', 'height': ''}
{'score': '', 'sex': '', 'name': '', 'weight': '', 'height': ''}
{'score': '', 'sex': '', 'name': '', 'weight': '', 'height': ''}
share|improve this answer

Let me explain a solution I almost used some time ago. But first, the reason I did not is illustrated by the fact that the following code:

d = {'from': 1}
x = dict2obj(d)

print x.from

gives this error:

  File "test.py", line 20
    print x.from == 1
                ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

Because "from" is a Python keyword there are certain dictionary keys you cannot allow.


Now my solution allows access to the dictionary items by using their names directly. But it also allows you to use "dictionary semantics". Here is the code with example usage:

class dict2obj(dict):
    def __init__(self, dict_):
        super(dict2obj, self).__init__(dict_)
        for key in self:
            item = self[key]
            if isinstance(item, list):
                for idx, it in enumerate(item):
                    if isinstance(it, dict):
                        item[idx] = dict2obj(it)
            elif isinstance(item, dict):
                self[key] = dict2obj(item)

    def __getattr__(self, key):
        return self[key]

d = {'a': 1, 'b': {'c': 2}, 'd': ["hi", {'foo': "bar"}]}

x = dict2obj(d)

assert x.a == x['a'] == 1
assert x.b.c == x['b']['c'] == 2
assert x.d[1].foo == x['d'][1]['foo'] == "bar"
share|improve this answer
    
class Struct: def init__(self, **entries): self.__dict.update(entries) –  Kenneth Reitz Jun 24 '10 at 18:56
class Struct(dict):
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        try:
            return self[name]
        except KeyError:
            raise AttributeError(name)

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        self[name] = value

    def copy(self):
        return Struct(dict.copy(self))

Usage:

points = Struct(x=1, y=2)
# Changing
points['x'] = 2
points.y = 1
# Accessing
points['x'], points.x, points.get('x') # 2 2 2
points['y'], points.y, points.get('y') # 1 1 1
# Accessing inexistent keys/attrs 
points['z'] # KeyError: z
points.z # AttributeError: z
# Copying
points_copy = points.copy()
points.x = 2
points_copy.x # 1
share|improve this answer

How about this:

from functools import partial
d2o=partial(type, "d2o", ())

This can then be used like this:

>>> o=d2o({"a" : 5, "b" : 3})
>>> print o.a
5
>>> print o.b
3
share|improve this answer

Building off my answer to "python: How to add property to a class dynamically?":

class data(object):
    def __init__(self,*args,**argd):
        self.__dict__.update(dict(*args,**argd))

def makedata(d):
    d2 = {}
    for n in d:
        d2[n] = trydata(d[n])
    return data(d2)

def trydata(o):
    if isinstance(o,dict):
        return makedata(o)
    elif isinstance(o,list):
        return [trydata(i) for i in o]
    else:
        return o

You call makedata on the dictionary you want converted, or maybe trydata depending on what you expect as input, and it spits out a data object.

Notes:

  • You can add elifs to trydata if you need more functionality.
  • Obviously this won't work if you want x.a = {} or similar.
  • If you want a readonly version, use the class data from the original answer.
share|improve this answer

I had some problems with __getattr__ not being called so I constructed a new style class version:

class Struct(object):
    '''The recursive class for building and representing objects with.'''
    class NoneStruct(object):
        def __getattribute__(*args):
            return Struct.NoneStruct()

        def __eq__(self, obj):
            return obj == None

    def __init__(self, obj):
        for k, v in obj.iteritems():
            if isinstance(v, dict):
                setattr(self, k, Struct(v))
            else:
                setattr(self, k, v)

    def __getattribute__(*args):
        try:
            return object.__getattribute__(*args)
        except:            
            return Struct.NoneStruct()

    def __repr__(self):
        return '{%s}' % str(', '.join('%s : %s' % (k, repr(v)) for 
(k, v) in self.__dict__.iteritems()))

This version also has the addition of NoneStruct that is returned when an attribute is called that is not set. This allows for None testing to see if an attribute is present. Very usefull when the exact dict input is not known (settings etc.).

bla = Struct({'a':{'b':1}})
print(bla.a.b)
>> 1
print(bla.a.c == None)
>> True
share|improve this answer

My dictionary is of this format:

addr_bk = {
    'person': [
        {'name': 'Andrew', 'id': 123, 'email': 'andrew@mailserver.com',
         'phone': [{'type': 2, 'number': '633311122'},
                   {'type': 0, 'number': '97788665'}]
        },
        {'name': 'Tom', 'id': 456,
         'phone': [{'type': 0, 'number': '91122334'}]}, 
        {'name': 'Jack', 'id': 7788, 'email': 'jack@gmail.com'}
    ]
}

As can be seen, I have nested dictionaries and list of dicts. This is because the addr_bk was decoded from protocol buffer data that converted to a python dict using lwpb.codec. There are optional field (e.g. email => where key may be unavailable) and repeated field (e.g. phone => converted to list of dict).

I tried all the above proposed solutions. Some doesn't handle the nested dictionaries well. Others cannot print the object details easily.

Only the solution, dict2obj(dict) by Dawie Strauss, works best.

I have enhanced it a little to handle when the key cannot be found:

# Work the best, with nested dictionaries & lists! :)
# Able to print out all items.
class dict2obj_new(dict):
    def __init__(self, dict_):
        super(dict2obj_new, self).__init__(dict_)
        for key in self:
            item = self[key]
            if isinstance(item, list):
                for idx, it in enumerate(item):
                    if isinstance(it, dict):
                        item[idx] = dict2obj_new(it)
            elif isinstance(item, dict):
                self[key] = dict2obj_new(item)

    def __getattr__(self, key):
        # Enhanced to handle key not found.
        if self.has_key(key):
            return self[key]
        else:
            return None

Then, I tested it with:

# Testing...
ab = dict2obj_new(addr_bk)

for person in ab.person:
  print "Person ID:", person.id
  print "  Name:", person.name
  # Check if optional field is available before printing.
  if person.email:
    print "  E-mail address:", person.email

  # Check if optional field is available before printing.
  if person.phone:
    for phone_number in person.phone:
      if phone_number.type == codec.enums.PhoneType.MOBILE:
        print "  Mobile phone #:",
      elif phone_number.type == codec.enums.PhoneType.HOME:
        print "  Home phone #:",
      else:
        print "  Work phone #:",
      print phone_number.number
share|improve this answer
from mock import Mock
d = {'a': 1, 'b': {'c': 2}, 'd': ["hi", {'foo': "bar"}]}
my_data = Mock(**d)

# We got
# my_data.a == 1
share|improve this answer

This is another, alternative, way to convert a list of dictionaries to an object:

def dict2object(in_dict):
    class Struct(object):
        def __init__(self, in_dict):
            for key, value in in_dict.items():
                if isinstance(value, (list, tuple)):
                    setattr(
                        self, key,
                        [Struct(sub_dict) if isinstance(sub_dict, dict)
                         else sub_dict for sub_dict in value])
                else:
                    setattr(
                        self, key,
                        Struct(value) if isinstance(value, dict)
                        else value)
    return [Struct(sub_dict) for sub_dict in in_dict] \
        if isinstance(in_dict, list) else Struct(in_dict)
share|improve this answer

This little class never gives me any problem, just extend it and use the copy() method:

  import simplejson as json

  class BlindCopy(object):

    def copy(self, json_str):
        dic = json.loads(json_str)
        for k, v in dic.iteritems():
            if hasattr(self, k):
                setattr(self, k, v);
share|improve this answer

protected by Community Dec 20 '13 at 19:36

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