Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anybody explain why I am getting result below?

Class that should be instantiated:

[System.SerializableAttribute()]
public class SampleClass
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(Order = 10)]
    public string Foo { get; set; }
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(Order = 5)]
    public string Bar { get; set; }
}

XML used for de-serialization:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<SampleClass>
  <Foo>Test1</Foo>
  <Bar>Test2</Bar>
</SampleClass>

I see Foo = Test1 (correct) and Bar = null (not correct) in de-serialized class.

This is all about Order attribute. It is on purpose set to wrong values. Everything works fine if values are 0 and 1.

Name and Order criteria do not match for both fields but for some reason one field is de-serialized while second one does not. I would rather expect to see Exception or both values = null or both fields resolved and de-serialized.

Is there any explanation for that?

share|improve this question
1  
Did you mean to do this? XmlSerializer(Order = 10) –  climbage Oct 24 '12 at 18:28
1  
there is no XmlSerializer attribute. –  Runner Oct 24 '12 at 18:29
    
So is your question: I'm deliberately doing it wrong but wondered why it's behaving differently to how I'd expect it to? –  RobH Oct 24 '12 at 18:38
    
CodeIgnoto: Thanks. I fixed sample. It is XmlElementAttribute in my code. –  Dmitry Harnitski Oct 24 '12 at 19:05
    
You might want to look at this article which explains why this can happen and offers solutions - webservices20.blogspot.com/2009/01/… –  Michael Levy Nov 25 '13 at 22:21

1 Answer 1

You do see a serialization error actually.

It really comes down to design preference. The developers decided that they didn't want to except and abort the entire deserialization process, but rather notify and continue.

Using your XML.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<SampleClass>
  <Foo>Test1</Foo>
  <Bar>Test2</Bar>
</SampleClass>

Consider this code to deserialize it.

XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(SampleClass));

XmlDeserializationEvents events = new XmlDeserializationEvents();
events.OnUnknownAttribute = (sender, e) => Debug.WriteLine("Unknown Attributed");
events.OnUnknownElement = (sender, e) => Debug.WriteLine("Unknwon Element");
events.OnUnknownNode = (sender, e) => Debug.WriteLine("Unknown Node");
events.OnUnreferencedObject = (sender, e) => Debug.WriteLine("Unreferenced Object");

SampleClass cs_de = (SampleClass)xs.Deserialize(XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(xml)), events);

Debug.WriteLine(cs_de.Foo);
Debug.WriteLine(cs_de.Bar);

When I use the correct ordering.

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(Order = 0)]
public string Foo { get; set; }
[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(Order = 1)]
public string Bar { get; set; }

My output is

Foo
Bar

When I use the incorrect ordering.

[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(Order = 10)]
public string Foo { get; set; }
[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(Order = 5)]
public string Bar { get; set; }

My output is

Unknown Node
Unknwon Element
Foo

So why does Foo print out? Well my understanding is that Order is NOT the index. The Ordering only specifies that Foo needs to appear before Bar, not that Foo needs to be the 10th element and Bar needs to be the 5th. I think this makes the deserializer more flexible.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for help. This partially answers my question. Still looking for answer for another part - Do you know why Foo is de-serialized even if it has wrong Order (the same as Bar). I would expect to see more consistent behavior (both field failed). –  Dmitry Harnitski Oct 24 '12 at 19:11
    
@DmitryHarnitski See my edit at the bottom. I don't see how it's not consistent, just not what you expected. –  climbage Oct 24 '12 at 19:20
    
Comment still does not explain the result. Both Elements have Order specified. Amount of fields in Class equals to amount of elements in XML. So result should be Bar = Test1 (because 5 is before 10) and Foo = Test2 –  Dmitry Harnitski Oct 24 '12 at 19:34
    
But Bar can't be Test1 because the element <Bar> has a value of Test2. The element name corresponds with the property name in your class. –  climbage Oct 24 '12 at 19:45
    
But Bar can't be Test1 - It should be according to Order. Test1 is value of first element in XML and Bar field has lowest Order value. –  Dmitry Harnitski Oct 24 '12 at 20:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.