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I define the variable "a" in the outerFunction. I want to use it in my innerFunction. How come this doesn't work, and what is the best way to pass data between nested functions?

var outerFunction = function () {
   var a = 5;
   innerFunction();
}


var innerFunction = function () {
   alert(a);
}

outerFunction();
share|improve this question
2  
Your "inner" function is not in anything :P – PeeHaa Oct 24 '12 at 18:31
    
7  
eeeeeeew. A 16k rep user promoting w3schools. Shame on you ;) – PeeHaa Oct 24 '12 at 18:33
1  
I like MDN, too, but it's certainly not beginner-level reading. – Blazemonger Oct 24 '12 at 18:35
2  
@Blazemonger: Yet, there are better introductions at developer.mozilla.org/en-US/learn/javascript – Bergi Oct 24 '12 at 18:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to add parameter to inner function and pass value to it from outer function.

Live Demo

var outerFunction = function () {
   var a = 5;
   innerFunction(a);
}


var innerFunction = function (a) {
   alert(a);
}

outerFunction();
share|improve this answer

innerFunction is not the inner function of outeFunction you are just calling it from outerFunction . Innerfunction should be defined like below.

var outerFunction = function () {
   var a = 5;
   var innerFunction = function () {
    alert(a);
   }
   innerFunction();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm worried if I start defining functions within functions, my script is quickly going to lose any modularity and just be a chain of one function. Is there a more modular way to do this? – Donny P Oct 24 '12 at 18:47
    
You should create function on same level. but pass parameter in called function as already suggested in other answers. above I showed how to create inner function. – Anoop Oct 24 '12 at 18:49

In javascript functions are bound to their context. It means that variable defined inside outerFunction exists only there and not in global context. But for function innerFunction this scope is not available. So you can't access it. If you need it you should pass it as an argument to innerFunction explictly.

share|improve this answer

Just actually nest them:

var outerFunction = function () {

    var innerFunction = function () {
        alert(a);
    }

    var a = 5;
    innerFunction();
}

outerFunction();

Now innerFunction's scope (to which the alert has acess) is inside the scope of the outerFunction where a is declared.

share|improve this answer
    
While this works, please don't do this, scope-sharing can be difficult to debug, use parameters instead. – Dusty J Mar 10 '13 at 19:18
    
@DustyJ: Huh? What's wrong with closures? Also, nesting them is the only way to get an "inner" and an "outer" function. – Bergi Mar 10 '13 at 20:50

var defines a local scope for a variable. If you don't intend to pass variables, then do this,

var outerFunction = function () {
   a = 5;
   innerFunction();
}


var innerFunction = function () {
   alert(a);
}

outerFunction();

But the clean approach would be to pass in the variable

innerFunction(a)
share|improve this answer
2  
Polluting the global scope is not a solution. – Shmiddty Oct 24 '12 at 18:34
1  
I don't understand the down vote here. I have mentioned, that if you dont intend to pass in the variables. I thought it would be a good learning as well for the person, and knowing the importance of var – Manjunath Manoharan Oct 24 '12 at 18:35
    
You forgot to mention it is really bad to do. – PeeHaa Oct 24 '12 at 18:35
    
Come on mate, this answer of mine should be accepted. – Manjunath Manoharan Oct 24 '12 at 18:36
    
accepted you say? You know only one answer can be accepted on a question right and the best should be chosen? – PeeHaa Oct 24 '12 at 18:39

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