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In Python, I'm poking around with an idea but I'm not exactly sure how to implement it correctly.

I have a pool of 26 letters ('A' - 'Z'), and each letter can be used as many times as needed. I want to create lists using these letters; each list will be 10 letters long with no repeats inside them, and I want to guarantee that if I compare any two lists generated, there will be exactly one letter in common.

Questions:

  • Is there a simple way to do this (i.e., by using library functions)?
  • Can I calculate the maximum number of lists I'll be able to create given the size of the pool (pool_size) and the length of the list (list_length)?

Any pointers to relevant material would be appreciated; I don't need an implementation so much as somewhere to lay my Archimedean lever (to be read as: I need a foundation before I can build my idea).

"Give me a place to stand on, and I will move the earth." - Archimedes

UPDATE: How naive of me to think that the alphabet was enough to work with. Let's expand the pool to 300 symbols, but keep the lists at length 10. Does that work?

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2  
If you have only 26 letters (A-Z), and each list is 10 letters long, then by the time you generate your 3rd list, it's guaranteed to have more than 1 letter in common with at least one of the other lists. –  voithos Oct 24 '12 at 18:54

2 Answers 2

With only 26 letters to choose from it's only possible to generate two lists.

Choose one letter at random and put that in both lists. Then pick 18 more different letters, and put nine at random in each list. Then your lists will look something like this:

ABCDEFGHIJ
AKLMNOPQRS

If you add a third list it's impossible to satisfy your constraints because there are only seven unused letters. The third list will have to share at least two letters with one of the other lists, which you disallow.


Update

This only partially answers your updated question, but I'll post it anyway as it might help you or others to find an optimal solution.

In general with n symbols and lists of length x you can easily generate at least floor((n-1)/(x-1)) lists by using the algorithm described above (picking 1 letter and adding it to all the lists. So for 300 symbols and lists of length 10 that gives 33 lists.

But it can be possible to improve on this by using a different algorithm. For example if n is 10 and x is 4 the above algorithm gives only three lists:

ABCD
AEFG
AHIJ

But an algorithm which reuses letters more efficiently can produce five lists:

ABCD
AEFG
BEHI
CFHJ
DGIJ

I generated these lists using a greedy algorithm: for each new list reuse as many different letters as possible from the previous lists, meaning that you add as few new letters as possible.

The second list reuses one letter from the first list and adds three new letters. The third list reuses a different letter from each of the first two lists and so introduces only two new letters. The fourth list reuses three letters that have already occured before, and adds one more new letter. The final list can now reuse a letter from each of the previous lists and does not need to add any new letters.


Update 2

The greedy algorithm definitely isn't an optimal solution.

Let's try: n = 26, x = 2

The simple solution gives the optimal 25 lists:

AB
AC
AD
..
AZ

The greedy algorithm however generates only 3 lists:

AB
AC
BC

Now it's impossible to add any more lists without breaking one of the rules.

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1  
You could also very easily just iterate through the pool in-order, and just use the last letter twice: ABCDEFGHIJ, JKLMNOPQRST. –  voithos Oct 24 '12 at 18:56
    
This is what I'm looking for; When I first tried this, I generated lists like your first example after the update, but I recognized that there had to be more. Is there a generalized algorithm that could produce something like your second one? –  taserian Oct 24 '12 at 19:16
    
@taserian: I have some vague ideas about how I'd solve this, but I'm wondering if someone else can come up with something clever... hopefully someone else will post a great answer that's simple and can solve both n = 26, x = 2 and n = 10, x = 4 optimally. –  Mark Byers Oct 24 '12 at 19:41

This was the general solution I found for all values of Set and Line Length. The first assumes you want no two solutions to share the same common element but you want each solution to have one element in common with every other solution. Given an infinite pool to pick form, the total number of solutions is limited by the length of each solution.

SET_LENGTH = 10
CHOICE_LENGTH = 300

data = set(range(CHOICE_LENGTH))
solutions =[]
solution_sets = []
used = set()

while True:
    new_solution = []
    #Try to get unique values from each previous set
    try:
        for sol_set in solution_sets:
            while True:
                candidate = sol_set.pop()
                if not candidate in used:
                    new_solution.append(candidate)
                    used.update([candidate])
                    break
    except KeyError, e:
        print e
        break
    #Fill with new data until the line is long enough
    try:
        while len(new_solution) < SET_LENGTH:
            new_solution.append(data.pop())
    except KeyError, e:
        print e
        break
    solutions.append(new_solution)
    solution_sets.append(set(new_solution))
#Show the results
for solution in solutions:
    print solution
print "Orphans %s" % len(data)   

For Example n = 300 x = 10 yields:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]
[1, 10, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26]
[2, 11, 19, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33]
[3, 12, 20, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39]
[4, 13, 21, 33, 34, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44]
[5, 14, 22, 27, 36, 40, 45, 46, 47, 48]
[6, 15, 23, 28, 37, 41, 45, 49, 50, 51]
[7, 16, 24, 29, 38, 42, 47, 49, 52, 53]
[8, 17, 25, 30, 39, 43, 48, 50, 52, 54]
[9, 18, 26, 31, 35, 44, 46, 51, 53, 54]
Orphans 245

If you don't care how many solutions share the same common element then it's even easier:

SET_LENGTH = 2
CHOICE_LENGTH = 300

data = set(range(CHOICE_LENGTH))
solutions =[]
alpha = data.pop()
while True:
    new_solution = [alpha]
    try:
        [new_solution.append(data.pop()) for x in range(SET_LENGTH-1)]
    except KeyError, e:
        break
    solutions.append(new_solution)

for solution in solutions:
    print solution
print "Solutions: %s" % len(solutions)
print "Orphans: %s" % len(data)
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The second algorithm sometimes gives fewer results than the first one, for example in the case n=10 x=4, as demonstrated by Mark Byers. –  Janne Karila Oct 26 '12 at 11:50

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