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I'm currently working on a slot machine for my Arduino, and one of the things I want to happen, is that when the user "pulls" the lever, a dinging sound can be heard, that slows down as time passes.

This is what I have so far, but I can't figure out how to make the delay variable with a countdown.

void ringading(){
    for (int i=10; i>10; i--)
    {
        for (int i=0; i<500; i++)
        {
            digitalWrite(BUZZER_PIN, HIGH);
            delayMicroseconds(1915);
            digitalWrite(BUZZER_PIN, LOW);
        }
        delay(1000);
    }
}

This is probably not the best way to do this, but I know it buzzes 10 times now, each with a one second delay in between. So I basically just need to get that delay to increase.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of delaying a constant number of milliseconds (1000) delay by a number of milliseconds that is a function of i, such as delay(1000*(10-i)) since i is decreasing.

Also, the larger loop should never run - are you sure you don't mean i>0?

Also also, you should use two different variable names for your two loops:

void ringading(){
  for (int i=10; i>0; i--)
    {
      for (int j=0; j<500; j++)
      {
        digitalWrite(BUZZER_PIN, HIGH);
        delayMicroseconds(1915);
        digitalWrite(BUZZER_PIN, LOW);
      }
      delay(1000*(10-i));
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, so I CAN use the i from the for loop. I gave it a quick shot, but it didnt seem to work when I tried it. And whoops, yes, that should be i>0. Thanks! –  Cleverbird Oct 24 '12 at 19:14
    
Yep - i is a variable that can be accessed at any time, just like a normal variable. You don't even have to declare it within the for loop (although it's often preferable to). The reason it didn't work before was probably because you also used i for the internal loop - so i would always be 500 at the time of the delay. –  PWhite Oct 24 '12 at 19:17

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