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I am trying to fetch in a single query a fixed set of rows, plus some other rows found by a subquery. My problem is that the query generated by my SQLAlchemy code is incorrect.

The problem is that the query generated by SQLAlchemy is as follows:

SELECT tbl.id AS tbl_id
FROM tbl
WHERE tbl.id IN
(
SELECT t2.id AS t2_id
FROM tbl AS t2, tbl AS t1
WHERE t2.id =
(
SELECT t3.id AS t3_id
FROM tbl AS t3, tbl AS t1
WHERE t3.id < t1.id ORDER BY t3.id DESC LIMIT 1 OFFSET 0
)
AND t1.id IN (4, 8)
)
OR tbl.id IN (0, 8)

while the correct query should not have the second tbl AS t1 (the goal from this query is to select IDs 0 and 8, as well as the IDs just before 4 and 8).

Unfortunately, I can't find how to get SQLAlchemy to generate the correct one (see the code below).

Suggestions to also achieve the same result with a simpler query are also welcome (they need to be efficient though -- I tried a few variants and some were a lot slower on my real use case).

The code producing the query:

from sqlalchemy import create_engine, or_
from sqlalchemy import Column, Integer, MetaData, Table
from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker

engine = create_engine('sqlite:///:memory:', echo=True)
meta = MetaData(bind=engine)
table = Table('tbl', meta, Column('id', Integer))
session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)()
meta.create_all()

# Insert IDs 0, 2, 4, 6, 8.
i = table.insert()
i.execute(*[dict(id=i) for i in range(0, 10, 2)])
print session.query(table).all()
# output: [(0,), (2,), (4,), (6,), (8,)]

# Subquery of interest: look for the row just before IDs 4 and 8.
sub_query_txt = (
        'SELECT t2.id '
        'FROM tbl t1, tbl t2 '
        'WHERE t2.id = ( '
        ' SELECT t3.id from tbl t3 '
        ' WHERE t3.id < t1.id '
        ' ORDER BY t3.id DESC '
        ' LIMIT 1) '
        'AND t1.id IN (4, 8)')
print session.execute(sub_query_txt).fetchall()
# output: [(2,), (6,)]

# Full query of interest: get the rows mentioned above, as well as more rows.
query_txt = (
        'SELECT * '
        'FROM tbl '
        'WHERE ( '
        ' id IN (%s) '
        'OR id IN (0, 8))'
        ) % sub_query_txt
print session.execute(query_txt).fetchall()
# output: [(0,), (2,), (6,), (8,)]

# Attempt at an SQLAlchemy translation (from innermost sub-query to full query).
t1 = table.alias('t1')
t2 = table.alias('t2')
t3 = table.alias('t3')
q1 = session.query(t3.c.id).filter(t3.c.id < t1.c.id).order_by(t3.c.id.desc()).\
             limit(1)
q2 = session.query(t2.c.id).filter(t2.c.id == q1, t1.c.id.in_([4, 8]))
q3 = session.query(table).filter(
                               or_(table.c.id.in_(q2), table.c.id.in_([0, 8])))
print list(q3)
# output: [(0,), (6,), (8,)]
share|improve this question
    
can you explain a bit more about the query you want; it's not clear from your question what data you're trying to get. Would query_text % sub_query_text return the correct rows if it were pasted into your database's commandline prompt? –  SingleNegationElimination Oct 24 '12 at 19:37
    
@TokenMacGuy: The included code does show that query_text % sub_query_text returns the correct results. The difference is that the subquery in sub_query_text (the inner-most) does not include a definition for t1; it's part of the outer query, and that changes the meaning. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 24 '12 at 20:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you are missing is a correlation between the innermost sub-query and the next level up; without the correlation, SQLAlchemy will include the t1 alias in the innermost sub-query:

>>> print str(q1)
SELECT t3.id AS t3_id 
FROM tbl AS t3, tbl AS t1 
WHERE t3.id < t1.id ORDER BY t3.id DESC
 LIMIT ? OFFSET ?
>>> print str(q1.correlate(t1))
SELECT t3.id AS t3_id 
FROM tbl AS t3 
WHERE t3.id < t1.id ORDER BY t3.id DESC
 LIMIT ? OFFSET ?

Note that tbl AS t1 is now missing from the query. From the .correlate() method documentation:

Return a Query construct which will correlate the given FROM clauses to that of an enclosing Query or select().

Thus, t1 is assumed to be part of the enclosing query, and isn't listed in the query itself.

Now your query works:

>>> q1 = session.query(t3.c.id).filter(t3.c.id < t1.c.id).order_by(t3.c.id.desc()).\
...              limit(1).correlate(t1)
>>> q2 = session.query(t2.c.id).filter(t2.c.id == q1, t1.c.id.in_([4, 8]))
>>> q3 = session.query(table).filter(
...                                or_(table.c.id.in_(q2), table.c.id.in_([0, 8])))
>>> print list(q3)
2012-10-24 22:16:22,239 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine SELECT tbl.id AS tbl_id 
FROM tbl 
WHERE tbl.id IN (SELECT t2.id AS t2_id 
FROM tbl AS t2, tbl AS t1 
WHERE t2.id = (SELECT t3.id AS t3_id 
FROM tbl AS t3 
WHERE t3.id < t1.id ORDER BY t3.id DESC
 LIMIT ? OFFSET ?) AND t1.id IN (?, ?)) OR tbl.id IN (?, ?)
2012-10-24 22:16:22,239 INFO sqlalchemy.engine.base.Engine (1, 0, 4, 8, 0, 8)
[(0,), (2,), (6,), (8,)]
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks a lot! And also thank you (I guess it was you, otherwise thanks to whoever did it) for editing my question and including the code (somehow I wasn't able to get it to display properly, at least in the preview). –  tiho Oct 24 '12 at 21:01
    
@tiho: That was me as well; see How do I format my code blocks? for more detailed help for next time. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Oct 24 '12 at 21:02

I'm only kinda sure I understand the query you're asking for. Lets break it down, though:

the goal from this query is to select IDs 0 and 8, as well as the IDs just before 4 and 8.

It looks like you want to query for two kinds of things, and then combine them. The proper operator for that is union. Do the simple queries and add them up at the end. I'll start with the second bit, "ids just before X".

To start with; lets look at the all the ids that are before some given value. For this, we'll join the table on itself with a <:

# select t1.id t1_id, t2.id t2_id from tbl t1 join tbl t2 on t1.id < t2.id;
 t1_id | t2_id 
-------+-------
     0 |     2
     0 |     4
     0 |     6
     0 |     8
     2 |     4
     2 |     6
     2 |     8
     4 |     6
     4 |     8
     6 |     8
(10 rows)

That certainly gives us all of the pairs of rows where the left is less than the right. Of all of them, we want the rows for a given t2_id that is as high as possible; We'll group by t2_id and select the maximum t1_id

# select max(t1.id), t2.id from tbl t1 join tbl t2 on t1.id < t2.id group by t2.id;
 max | id 
-----+-------
   0 |     2
   2 |     4
   4 |     6
   6 |     8
(4 rows)

Your query, using a limit, could achieve this, but its usually a good idea to avoid using this technique when alternatives exist because partitioning does not have good, portable support across Database implementations. Sqlite can use this technique, but postgresql doesn't like it, it uses a technique called "analytic queries" (which are both standardised and more general). MySQL can do neither. The above query, though, works consistently across all sql database engines.

the rest of the work is just using in or other equivalent filtering queries and are not difficult to express in sqlalchemy. The boilerplate...

>>> import sqlalchemy as sa
>>> from sqlalchemy.orm import Query
>>> engine = sa.create_engine('sqlite:///:memory:')
>>> meta = sa.MetaData(bind=engine)
>>> table = sa.Table('tbl', meta, sa.Column('id', sa.Integer))
>>> meta.create_all()

>>> table.insert().execute([{'id':i} for i in range(0, 10, 2)])

>>> t1 = table.alias()
>>> t2 = table.alias()

>>> before_filter = [4, 8]

First interesting bit is we give the 'max(id)' expression a name. this is needed so that we can refer to it more than once, and to lift it out of a subquery.

>>> c1 = sa.func.max(t1.c.id).label('max_id')
>>> #                                ^^^^^^

The 'heavy lifting' portion of the query, join the above aliases, group and select the max

>>> q1 = Query([c1, t2.c.id]) \
...      .join((t2, t1.c.id < t2.c.id)) \
...      .group_by(t2.c.id) \
...      .filter(t2.c.id.in_(before_filter))

Because we'll be using a union, we need this to produce the right number of fields: we wrap it in a subquery and project down to the only column we're interested in. This will have the name we gave it in the above label() call.

>>> q2 = Query(q1.subquery().c.max_id)
>>> #                          ^^^^^^

The other half of the union is much simpler:

>>> t3 = table.alias()
>>> exact_filter = [0, 8]
>>> q3 = Query(t3).filter(t3.c.id.in_(exact_filter))

All that's left is to combine them:

>>> q4 = q2.union(q3)
>>> engine.execute(q4.statement).fetchall()
[(0,), (2,), (6,), (8,)]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I appreciate the detailed answer (which I don't have time to read entirely right now as I gotta run, but I'll check it out later). –  tiho Oct 24 '12 at 21:03
    
Read it :) Thanks again, all good points! Few comments: (1) I'm actually using MySQL in my real world code and the LIMIT approach works, (2) Why not just selecting c1 in q1 to avoid having to remove the extra field? (3) I'll need to benchmark it again, but I believe I initially tried the MAX / GROUP BY approach and it was a lot slower than with LIMIT (I wasn't using an explicit join though, which might make a difference). –  tiho Oct 24 '12 at 22:05
    
So, just to confirm: for some reason I don't fully understand, the MAX / GROUP BY approach is a lot slower (2 min vs 2 sec). This is on MySQL with a table of 10 million rows (id is the primary key). –  tiho Oct 25 '12 at 1:03
    
can you post the query plan for both? –  SingleNegationElimination Oct 25 '12 at 11:58
    
See EXPLAIN here: gist.github.com/3952414. Note that I ended up using a slightly different approach, as the LIMIT approach actually turned out to be quite slow too on a different table (even though it had the same structure...) –  tiho Oct 26 '12 at 0:19

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