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We are given a nxn square matrix with 0s and 1s. 0 means blocked cell and 1 means open cell where a robot can walk. If your robot is at (0,0) initially, what are the number of ways to reach (n-1,n-1).
Your robot can go left,right,up and down. The paths need to be distinct. As in if you have a loop then you can calculate the path as 1 and not infinite. For instance the answer to 7x7 matrix.

1 1 0 1 1 0 1
0 1 0 0 1 1 1
1 1 1 1 0 1 0
0 1 0 1 1 1 1
0 1 0 0 1 0 1
0 1 1 1 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 1 1 1

is 4

The 4 paths are:
_ _ 0 1 1 0 1
0 _ 0 0 1 1 1
1 _ 1 1 0 1 0
0 _ 0 1 1 1 1
0 _ 0 0 1 0 1
0 _ _ _ _ 0 1
0 0 0 0 _ _ _

_ _ 0 1 1 0 1
0 _ 0 0 1 1 1
1 _ 1 1 0 1 0
0 _ 0 1 _ _ _
0 _ 0 0 _ 0 _
0 _ _ _ _ 0 _
0 0 0 0 1 1 _

_ _ 0 1 1 0 1
0 _ 0 0 1 1 1
1 _ _ _ 0 1 0
0 1 0 _ _ 1 1
0 1 0 0 _ 0 1
0 1 1 1 _ 0 1
0 0 0 0 _ _ _

_ _ 0 1 1 0 1
0 _ 0 0 1 1 1
1 _ _ _ 0 1 0
0 1 0 _ _ _ _
0 1 0 0 1 0 _
0 1 1 1 1 0 _
0 0 0 0 1 1 _

I have solved problems using dp when the robot is allowed to move right and down only. Please help me with the algorithm only for the same. Do I have to convert this to a graph and apply some algorithm.

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I count at least 5 ways through that matrix... –  corsiKa Oct 24 '12 at 19:25
1  
I'm not using diagionals. You have 4 branches on the solvable paths, so you should end up with more than 4 solutions. –  corsiKa Oct 24 '12 at 19:30
1  
I smell DFS with a bit of taboo –  alestanis Oct 24 '12 at 19:33
1  
If you had a way to do this efficiently, you'd have an efficient way to find longest paths in a graph, and therefore hamiltonian paths. I don't think you can do it without brute force. Maybe you want to count paths of a certain length, allowing the same node to be visited multiple times, or the number of shortest paths? There are (more) efficient algorithms for those. –  IVlad Oct 24 '12 at 19:34
1  
Is backtracking allowed? For example, are these two considered different paths? i45.tinypic.com/9qbn93.png (Ignore that it looks like there's a diagional there... there isn't, I just got a little sloppy with the lines...) –  corsiKa Oct 24 '12 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you should do a DFS with memory of the followed path. In pseudocode, it would look like this:

DFS(matrix, path):
   /* End conditions */
   If path.last is [n-1, n-1]
      print path /* Hooray! Found a path! */
   If path.last has already been visited in path
      Discard solution
   If path.last is out of bounds (coordinates < 0 or > n-1)
      Discard solution
   If matrix[path.last] value is 0
      Discard solution

   /* We're in the middle of a path: continue exploring */
   For direction in [1, 0], [0, 1], [-1, 0], [0, -1]
      Add [path.last + direction] to path // Move north, south, east, west
      DFS(matrix, path)
      Remove last element from path

/* Call the algorithm */
DFS(matrix, [1, 1])

In this algorithm, you can pass around references to matrix and path, which gives you a constant memory algorithm (you have only one instance of path around). As for time complexity, this would be linear on the number of possible paths (because you explore each possible path once, even dismissed ones), and quadratic on their length (because you test, for each point, if it is already present in the path with linear search). Keep in mind that the number of paths can me exponential on n, and that the length of a path is, worst case, n^2. Very slow brute force algorithm.

The worst case for this algorithm would be a matrix filled with only ones with exponential complexity.

The best case would be a matrix with only one possible path between [1, 1] and [n-1, n-1]. In that case, you have a complexity on the length of the path, which can be between O(n) and O(n^2).

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I was wondering if there is any known algorithm to improve the worst case? There seems to be so much symmetry in the grid but still divide and conquer or dynamic programming seems unlikely to help much. I know if the width is less than 5 then it's possible e.g. robert-king.com/posts/20111103_grid_tours –  robert king Nov 4 '12 at 10:43

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